What evidence is there on the clinical and cost effectiveness of major trauma centres, as the core component of a trauma service, compared with standard care for adults with major trauma? – Healthcare Improvement Scotland – 19 July 2013

Posted on August 2, 2013. Filed under: Emergency Medicine | Tags: , |

What evidence is there on the clinical and cost effectiveness of major trauma centres, as the core component of a trauma service, compared with standard care for adults with major trauma? – Healthcare Improvement Scotland – 19 July 2013

Major trauma centres as the core component of a trauma service: Technologies scoping report 17

“In response to an enquiry from the National Planning Forum

The following questions were scoped:
1. What evidence is there that adults with major trauma have better outcomes if cared for in a major trauma centre, as the core component of a trauma service, compared with standard care?

2. What is the evidence for the cost effectiveness of trauma centres, as the core component of a trauma service, compared with standard care for adults with major trauma?”

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on What evidence is there on the clinical and cost effectiveness of major trauma centres, as the core component of a trauma service, compared with standard care for adults with major trauma? – Healthcare Improvement Scotland – 19 July 2013 )

Complex trauma research in the UK: A rapid review of the funding landscape – RAND – April 2011

Posted on April 21, 2011. Filed under: Research | Tags: , |

Complex trauma research in the UK: A rapid review of the funding landscape – RAND – April 2011

by Molly Morgan Jones, Jonathan Grant

“At the request of the English Department of Health, a rapid review of research funding in the field of complex trauma in the UK is needed. The information gathered will feed into ongoing strategic discussions between DH and the Ministry of Defence (MoD). RAND Europe will map the research landscape in the UK, with a focus on areas of excellence and the nature of funding (public and private), conduct a series of interviews with leading experts, and undertake a strategic assessment of the wider state of research in this area. A brief assessment of the international landscape will also be provided to assist in the identification of gaps and overlaps. The report draws several conclusions, the most notable of which is that complex trauma research is arguably a ‘niche’ and ‘orphan’ area of research in the UK with approximately £15m of funding per annum. The UK lacks capacity and capability in several areas of complex trauma research, though individual research fields sectors within complex trauma (i.e. regenerative medicine or orthopaedic research) are strong. Complex trauma research in the UK could benefit from better integration between military and civilian sectors to maximise synergies and research strengths in each.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Implementing trauma systems: key issues for the NHS – Ambulance Service Network, NHS Confederation – 2010

Posted on August 20, 2010. Filed under: Emergency Medicine | Tags: , |

Implementing trauma systems: key issues for the NHS – Ambulance Service Network, NHS Confederation – 2010

Table of contents
Executive summary
Introduction
Section 1: Changing the trauma pathway
Section 2: Trauma systems – evidence analysis and discussion
Conclusion
References
Appendix

Extract from the summary:
“Trauma is the main cause of death in the first four decades of life and a leading cause of disability. Following a series of high-profile reports it is recognised that, while emergency care has improved, treatment for victims of major injury could be improved and coordinating trauma services is now a priority for the NHS. There is significant variation in outcomes across the system. Better organisation of care could ensure consistently higher standards of care. Evidence suggests that introducing trauma systems can reduce mortality rates by around 10 per cent, more efficiently use the £300-400m spending on emergency care for major injuries and contribute to reducing the estimated £3.3bn – £3.7bn annual economic cost of trauma.”

…continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Major trauma care in England – National Audit Office – 5 February 2010

Posted on February 9, 2010. Filed under: Emergency Medicine | Tags: , , |

Major trauma care in England – National Audit Office – 5 February 2010
HC: 213, 2009-10
ISBN: 9780102963472

* Executive summary (PDF – 85KB)
* Full report (PDF – 478KB)
* Press notice (HTML)
* Methodology (PDF – 87KB)

“Current services for people who suffer major trauma are not good enough. There is unacceptable variation, which means that if you are unlucky enough to have an accident at night or at the weekend, in many areas you are likely to receive worse quality of care and are more likely to die. The Department of Health and the NHS must get a grip on coordinating services through trauma networks, on costs and on information on major trauma care, if they are to prevent unnecessary deaths.”
Amyas Morse, head of the National Audit Office, 5 February 2010

“There is unacceptable variation in major trauma care in England depending upon where and when people are treated, according to a National Audit Office report published today. Care for patients who have suffered major trauma, for example following a road accident or a fall, has not significantly improved in the last 20 years despite numerous reports identifying poor practice, and services are not being delivered efficiently or effectively.

Survival rates vary significantly from hospital to hospital, with a range from five unexpected survivors to eight unexpected deaths per 100 trauma patients, reflecting the variable quality of care. The NAO estimates that 450 to 600 lives could be saved each year in England if major trauma care was managed more effectively.

For best outcomes care should be led by consultants experienced in major trauma; but major trauma is most likely to occur at night and at weekends, when consultants are not normally in the emergency department. Only one hospital has 24-hour consultant care, seven days a week.

Major trauma care is not coordinated and there are no formal arrangements for taking patients directly for specialist treatment or transferring them between hospitals. CT scanning is very important for major trauma patients; however, a significant number of patients that need a scan do not receive one. Not enough patients who need a critical care bed are given one.

Access to rehabilitation services, which can improve patients’ recovery, quality of life and reduce the length of hospital stay, varies across the country and patients are not always receiving the care that they need. The costs of major trauma care are not well understood. The estimated annual lost economic output from deaths and serious injuries from major trauma is between £3.3 billion and £3.7 billion.

Collecting information on care is essential for monitoring and improving services, but only 60 per cent of hospitals delivering major trauma care contribute to the Trauma Audit and Research Network (TARN). The performance of the 40 per cent of hospitals that do not submit data to TARN cannot be measured. “

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Regional trauma systems: interim guidance for commissioners – The Royal College of Surgeons of England – December 2009

Posted on December 29, 2009. Filed under: Emergency Medicine | Tags: , |

Regional trauma systems: interim guidance for commissioners – The Royal College of Surgeons of England – December 2009

“This document aims to provide generic information on trauma and trauma systems, and presents a proven practical and evidence-based model suitable for regional trauma systems in the UK. It is aimed at regional commissioners and other stakeholders involved in the assessment of the provision of trauma care and the reconfiguration of services to regionalised trauma systems.”

The Royal College of Surgeons of England – publications

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...