Sustainability, Partnerships, and Teamwork in Health IT Implementation: Essential Findings From the Transforming Healthcare Quality Through IT Grants – AHRQ – December 2012

Posted on January 4, 2013. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: , |

Sustainability, Partnerships, and Teamwork in Health IT Implementation: Essential Findings From the Transforming Healthcare Quality Through IT Grants – AHRQ – December 2012

“This report synthesizes findings across several sources, focusing specifically on sustainability, partnerships, and effective teamwork—which were recognized by THQIT grantees as critical aspects of successful health IT implementation. The goal is to provide relevant information to those currently working toward health IT implementation.”

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Felt-Lisk S, Ferry G, Roper R, Au M, Walker J, Jones JB, Lerch S. Sustainability, Partnerships, and Teamwork in Health IT Implementation: Essential Findings From the Transforming Healthcare Quality Through IT Grant. (Prepared by Mathematica Policy Research and Geisinger Health System, under Contract No. HHSA 290200900019I). AHRQ  Publication No. 12-0075-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. December 2012.

“This report focuses specifically on sustainability, partnerships, and effective teamwork—which were recognized by THQIT grantees as critical aspects of successful health IT implementation. The goal is to provide those currently working towards health IT implementations with information to support more effective implementation.

This report offers insights into four questions:
●● Sustainability: How likely was the projects’ purposeful use of health IT to be sustained and what factors influence the sustainability of health IT projects?
●● Vendors: How should patient care delivery organizations engage and work with health IT vendors?
●● Other Cross-Organization Partnerships: How can health care organizations work together to facilitate health IT implementation?
●● End Users: What methods of involving intended end users of grant-featured health IT did grantees find most valuable?”

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TeamSTEPPS® Long-Term Care Version – AHRQ – 2012

Posted on November 20, 2012. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Educ for Hlth Professions | Tags: |

TeamSTEPPS® Long-Term Care Version – AHRQ – 2012

AHRQ = US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

“The Long-Term Care version of TeamSTEPPS adapts the core concepts of the TeamSTEPPS program to reflect the environment of nursing homes and other other long-term care settings such as assisted living and continuing care retirement communities. The examples, discussions, and exercises below are tailored to the long-term care environment.”

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The nursing team: common goals different roles – Royal College of Nursing – 27 March 2012

Posted on April 5, 2012. Filed under: Nursing | Tags: , |

The nursing team: common goals different roles – Royal College of Nursing – 27 March 2012

“Historically, the nursing team has consisted of nurses, midwives, students and support workers, all delivering aspect of nursing care, but with different levels of responsibility and decision making. The team has developed considerably and become more complex over recent years as new roles such as assistant practitioners (APs) have been created. This briefing aims to assist health care assistants (HCAs), APs, registered nurses, colleagues, patients and the public to understand how the team functions and works together.”

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Measuring Teamwork in Health Care Settings: A Review of Survey Instruments – Harvard Business School – Published 22 September 2011

Posted on September 23, 2011. Filed under: Health Professions, Workforce | Tags: , |

Measuring Teamwork in Health Care Settings: A Review of Survey Instruments – Harvard Business School – Published 22 September 2011
Authors: Melissa A. Valentine, Ingrid M. Nembhard, and Amy C. Edmondson

Executive Summary:
It is critical to accurately assess teamwork in health-care organizations. About 60 percent of primary-care practices in the United States use team-based models to coordinate work across the broad spectrum of health professionals needed to deliver quality care; in many other countries the percentage is almost 100 percent. While the benefits of effective teamwork are substantial, effective teamwork is often lacking in these settings, with negative consequences for patients. To date, little has been known about the survey instruments available to measure teamwork. In this paper Valentine, Nembhard, and Edmondson report the results of their systematic review of survey instruments that have been used to measure teamwork in various contexts. Their research helps to identify existing teamwork scales that may be most useful in testing theoretical models. Key concepts include:

•Researchers often develop a new scale for their project rather than adapt existing scales. It would be better to utilize existing, psychometrically valid scales when possible so that cumulative knowledge of teamwork can be built.
•Many scales have been developed to assess teamwork. However, only eight scales satisfy the standard psychometric criteria the authors identified, and only three of those have been significantly associated with non-self-reported outcomes.
•Future research needs to clarify the concept of teamwork. Currently, the variation in ways of conceptualizing teamwork even within the scales that do show relationships to outcomes of interest makes it difficult to know what dimensions are core versus peripheral to the concept.
•The criteria set forth in this article should be considered standard research practice, and as such the scales that the authors identified are worthy of attention.”
..

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How does teamwork support GPs and Allied Health Professionals to work together? Primary Health Care Research and Information Service – September 2010

Posted on October 5, 2010. Filed under: Allied Health, General Practice | Tags: , |

How does teamwork support GPs and Allied Health Professionals to work together? Primary Health Care Research and Information Service – September 2010

“A well coordinated health system provides a comprehensive and continuous experience for the patient, promotes teamwork between practitioners, and the coordination of service delivery organisations. Improving teamwork between General Practitioners (GPs) and Allied Health Providers (AHPs) has been an ongoing challenge for Australia due to the split responsibility for primary health care between Commonwealth and State jurisdictions leading to incompatible systems of funding and accountability. Integration of services at the regional level has been identified as a priority in Australia’s Primary Health Care Strategy. This issue of RESEARCH ROUNDup highlights Australian research and systematic reviews that have addressed the role of teamwork in system integration in primary health care.”

…continues on the site

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Diversity in Experience and Team Familiarity: Evidence from Software Development (revised) – Harvard Business School – August 2009

Posted on August 19, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: , |

Diversity in Experience and Team Familiarity: Evidence from Software Development (revised)
Authors:    Robert S. Huckman and Bradley R. Staats

Abstract

“In knowledge-intensive settings, such as product or software development, fluid teams of individuals with different sets of experience are tasked with projects that are critical to the success of their organizations. Although building teams from individuals with diverse prior experience is increasingly necessary, prior work examining the relationship between experience and performance fails to find a consistent effect of diversity in experience on performance. The problem is that diversity in experience improves a team’s information processing capacity and knowledge base but also creates coordination challenges. We hypothesize that team familiarity—team members’ prior experience working with one another—is one mechanism that helps teams leverage the benefits of diversity in team member experience by alleviating coordination problems that diversity creates. We use detailed project- and individual-level data from an Indian software services firm to examine the effects of team familiarity and diversity in experience on performance for software development projects. We find the interaction of team familiarity and diversity in experience has a complementary effect on a project being delivered on time and on budget. In team familiarity, we identify one mechanism for capturing the performance benefits of diversity in experience and provide insight into how the management of experience accumulation affects team performance.”

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Feeling the Heat: The Effects of Performance Pressure on Teams’ Knowledge Use and Performance – Harvard Business School – 9 July 2009

Posted on July 10, 2009. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: , , , , |

Feeling the Heat: The Effects of Performance Pressure on Teams’ Knowledge Use and Performance

Published:      July 9, 2009
Paper Released: April 2009
Author: Heidi K. Gardner

“Executive Summary:

Why do teams often fail to use their knowledge resources effectively even after they have correctly identified the experts among them? Project teams are a prominent feature of the knowledge-based economy, and member expertise has long been recognized as an important resource that can greatly affect team performance, but only to the extent that it is accurately recognized and used to accomplish the objective. The step between recognizing others’ expertise and then actually applying it to achieve a collective outcome, however, is highly problematic: Even when individuals know who holds relevant task expertise, they are often unwilling or unable to give the experts appropriate influence over the group process and outcomes. HBS professor Heidi K. Gardner takes a multidisciplinary approach to develop theory explaining how interpersonal dynamics in teams affect members’ use of each other’s distinct knowledge, ultimately leading to differential performance outcomes. Key concepts include:

* Teams facing significant performance pressures tend to default to high-status members at the expense of using team members with deep knowledge of the client, with detrimental effects on team performance.

* The more important the project, the less effective the team: Excessive performance pressure results in the team reverting to less effective ways of divvying up influence over its end product, in turn leading to lower performance ratings for the whole team.

* Team process is important in enabling organizations to harness knowledge resources for the benefit of maintaining strong relations with their clients.”

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Teams in Action: Primary Health Care Teams for Canadians April 2009 Health Council of Canada

Posted on May 1, 2009. Filed under: Multidisciplinary Care, Primary Hlth Care | Tags: , , |

Teams in Action: Primary Health Care Teams for Canadians  April 2009 Report from the Health Council of Canada

Health Council of Canada. (2009). Teams in Action: Primary Health Care Teams for Canadians. Toronto: Health Council.
ISBN: 978-1-897463-56-7

As Canada’s health care system deals with an aging population, collaborative health care teams are an effective way to treat the increasing number of Canadians with chronic health conditions.  Collaborative team care is a significant shift in the way Canadians are receiving their primary health care. Many Canadians may not know that this type of health care service is available to them, but they should – both as taxpayers and people who use health care services.

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