Public Health Surveillance: Towards a Public Health Surveillance Strategy for England – December 2012

Posted on October 17, 2013. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Public Health Surveillance: Towards a Public Health Surveillance Strategy for England – December 2012

“This document has been prepared for the Public Health England Information and Intelligence Working Group. It provides an overview of the vision, rationale, and plans for delivery of a surveillance strategy for Public Health England, as part of a broader information management strategy for Public Health England, and sets out the key benefits and challenges in delivering such a strategy.”

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Health and Wellbeing of Adults in Western Australia 2010, Overview and Trends – Department of Health – July 2011

Posted on July 25, 2011. Filed under: Health Status, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Health and Wellbeing of Adults in Western Australia 2010, Overview and Trends – Department of Health – July 2011

Davis, Philippa and Joyce, Sarah 2011. Health and Wellbeing of Adults in Western Australia 2010, Overview and Trends. Department of Health, Western Australia.

Extract from the introduction:

“The WA Health & Wellbeing Surveillance System (HWSS) is a continuous data collection system which was developed to monitor the health and wellbeing of Western Australians. Each month, at least 550 people throughout Western Australia are interviewed. The HWSS began in March 2002 and as at December 2010 about 55,000 adults have been interviewed.

People are asked questions on a range of indicators related to health and wellbeing. Topics include chronic health conditions, lifestyle risk factors, protective factors and socio-demographics. Information from the survey is used to monitor the health status of all Western Australians, to inform health education programs, to evaluate interventions and programs, to inform and support health policy development, to identify and monitor emerging trends and to inform and support health service planning and development.”  … continues

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Detecting flu and other disease outbreaks sooner – 2 September 2010

Posted on September 6, 2010. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu | Tags: , |

2 September 2010
Detecting flu and other disease outbreaks sooner

“New methods for detecting disease outbreaks earlier have been developed in a collaborative effort between CSIRO and NSW Health.
According to an article published recently in the journal Institute of Industrial Engineers Transactions, the new methodologies may enable health authorities to take action sooner to implement disease outbreak control measures.
“New methods developed by CSIRO statisticians have the potential to give an earlier-than-ever indication of whether a flu season is behaving normally or not,” says CSIRO Mathematics, Informatics and Statistics’ Chief, Dr Louise Ryan.”
…continues on the site

About the article mentioned:

Understanding sources of variation in syndromic surveillance for early warning of natural or intentional disease outbreaks 
Authors: Ross Sparksa; Chris Carterb; Petra Grahamc; David Muscatellod; Tim Churchesd; Jill Kaldord; Robyn Turnerd; Wei Zhengd; Louise Ryan
IIE Transactions, Volume 42, Issue 9 September 2010 , pages 613 – 631
DOI: 10.1080/07408170902942667
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07408170902942667

Abstract
Daily counts of computer records of hospital emergency department arrivals grouped according to diagnosis (called here syndrome groupings) can be monitored by epidemiologists for changes in frequency that could provide early warning of bioterrorism events or naturally occurring disease outbreaks and epidemics. This type of public health surveillance is sometimes called syndromic surveillance. We used transitional Poisson regression models to obtain one-day-ahead arrival forecasts. Regression parameter estimates and forecasts were updated for each day using the latest 365 days of data. The resulting time series of recursive estimates of parameters such as the amplitude and location of the seasonal peaks as well as the one-day-ahead forecasts and forecast errors can be monitored to understand changes in epidemiology of each syndrome grouping.

The counts for each syndrome grouping were autocorrelated and non-homogeneous Poisson. As such, the main methodological contribution of the article is the adaptation of Cumulative Sum (CUSUM) and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) plans for monitoring non-homogeneous counts. These plans were valid for small counts where the assumption of normally distributed one-day-ahead forecasts errors, typically used in other papers, breaks down. In addition, these adaptive plans have the advantage that control limits do not have to be trained for different syndrome groupings or aggregations of emergency departments.

Conventional methods for signaling increases in syndrome grouping counts, Shewhart, CUSUM, and EWMA control charts of the standardized forecast errors were also examined. Shewhart charts were, at times, insensitive to shifts of interest. CUSUM and EWMA charts were only reasonable for large counts. We illustrate our methods with respiratory, influenza, diarrhea, and abdominal pain syndrome groupings.

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Status of State Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems – United States, 2007 – published 30 July 2009

Posted on August 2, 2009. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , , |

Status of State Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems – United States, 2007 – published 30 July 2009

“The National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) is a web-based system that uses standard health information technology (IT) codes to integrate disease surveillance systems, enabling them to transfer public health, laboratory, and clinical data securely from health-care providers to public health departments (1). Each jurisdictions’ system consists of a base system and modules that can be used for specific surveillance purposes. States also use NEDSS-like or other electronic systems to conduct surveillance on specific diseases or conditions.* Until recently, no assessment had been done to describe the status and characteristics of state electronic disease surveillance systems. The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) conducted such an assessment in August 2007 in all 50 states. This report presents the results of that assessment, which indicated that, in 2007, state electronic disease surveillance systems varied widely and were in various stages of implementation. Each state had either custom-built systems or purchased systems that were customizable, with associated disease modules to meet its own surveillance needs. As interoperability becomes the standard for electronic data sharing, more states will face customization costs and the need to hire more technical specialists who can manage health information and exchange. Further collaboration and support from surveillance and health-care IT stakeholders with public health will be needed to improve the efficacy and quality of electronic disease surveillance systems.”  .. continues on the website

Full text of the report:  CDC. NEDSS: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System. CDC Solutions; 2007

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