Deep and Persistent Disadvantage in Australia – Productivity Commission – July 2013

Posted on July 24, 2013. Filed under: Research | Tags: , , , |

Deep and Persistent Disadvantage in Australia – Productivity Commission – July 2013

ISBN 978-1-74037-445-3
McLachlan, R., Gilfillan, G. and Gordon, J. 2013, Deep and Persistent Disadvantage in Australia, rev., Productivity Commission Staff Working Paper, Canberra.

“…this research paper has sought to find answers to a number of questions, including:
• what does it mean to be disadvantaged?
• how many Australians are disadvantaged and who are they?
• what is the depth and persistence of disadvantage in Australia?
• where do Australians experiencing disadvantage live?
• what factors influence a person’s risk of experiencing disadvantage?
• what are the costs of disadvantage and who bears them?”

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Is social capital good for health? A European perspective – WHO Regional Office for Europe – 2012

Posted on October 22, 2012. Filed under: Health Status | Tags: , , , , , |

Is social capital good for health? A European perspective – WHO Regional Office for Europe – 2012

ISBN 978-92-890-0273-8
Lorenzo Rocco, University of Padua, Italy
Marc Suhrcke, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom

“Abstract
The aim of the research reported here was to examine the causal impact of social capital on health in 14 European countries. Using data from the European Social Survey for 14 European countries, supplemented by regional-level data, the authors studied whether individual and/or community-level social capital positively affects health. The authors controlled for other relevant factors that are also expected to affect health, and addressed – via an instrumental variable approach – the challenge of assessing causality in the relationship between social capital and health. The large variance of the error term due to measurement errors calls for strong instruments to obtain reliable estimates in a finite  sample. The dataset is rich enough in information to allow the finding of a seemingly strong causal relationship between social capital and individual health. Community social capital (defined at regional level) appears not to affect health once individual-level social capital is controlled for. Taken at face value, the findings suggest that policy interventions should be targeted at improving primarily individual social capital. In doing so they would achieve a double effect: on the one hand they would directly improve individual health; on the other they would contribute to  community social capital, which reinforces the beneficial role of individual social capital.”

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