Draft National Road Safety Strategy 2011 – 2020 – Australian Government Department of Infrastructure and Transport

Posted on February 7, 2011. Filed under: Health Policy | Tags: , , |

Draft National Road Safety Strategy 2011 – 2020 – Australian Government Department of Infrastructure and Transport

“On average, four people are killed and 80 are seriously injured every day on Australia’s roads. Almost everyone has, at some stage, been affected by a road crash.

Australian Transport Ministers have asked the heads of transport and roads agencies around the country to work together to prepare a new 10-year National Road Safety Strategy for the period from 2011 to 2020. The new strategy is intended to set an ambitious long-term vision for road safety improvement in Australia and to guide national action over the coming decade.

Transport agencies have been working hard to develop a draft National Road Safety Strategy and would like to hear from the community on its proposals.”     … continues on the site

Comment on the draft strategy from the ABC:
Call for total ban on phones while driving

 “There is a push for the use of mobile phones to be totally banned in cars, after a report found drivers using phones are at a much greater risk of crashing – even when using them hands-free.

A draft national road safety report recommended the consideration of the total ban on mobile phone use in vehicles as one of a range of strategies to cut the road toll.

Researcher Mark Stevenson from Monash University’s accident research centre says the report shows the risks to drivers.

“It’s around a fourfold increased risk if you’re holding the phone, in terms of crashing resulting in an injury,” he said.

“Hands-free, it’s around 3.7 times the risk.” ” …continues on the site

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Ergonomic Program Implementation Continuum (EPIC): Integration of Health and Safety – A Process Evaluation

Posted on January 19, 2011. Filed under: Workforce | Tags: , |

Ergonomic Program Implementation Continuum (EPIC): Integration of Health and Safety – A Process Evaluation

“Executive Summary

The Public Service Health and Safety Association (PSHSA), formerly the Ontario Safety Association for Community & Healthcare (OSACH), recently developed a unique approach to the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and slips, trips and falls (STF) for staff, clients and the public.  The Ergonomic Program Implementation Continuum (EPIC) is the first of its kind in Ontario and provides vital information and guidance to employers and employees. The Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation (ONF) and PSHSA conducted a pilot project to evaluate EPIC as a “best practice in the health and community care sector”. Limitations aside, all sites indicated that EPIC benefited their organization. The program was structured but flexible enough to address the unique needs of each organization. In particular, the program supported the inclusion of frontline staff in reducing hazards and improving their work environment.”

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Emergency Vehicle Visibility and Conspicuity Study – U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) – August 2009

Posted on August 24, 2009. Filed under: Disaster Management, Emergency Medicine | Tags: , , |

Emergency Vehicle Visibility and Conspicuity Study – U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) – August 2009

From the Executive Summary

“Over the past decade, numerous law enforcement officers, firefighters, and emergency medical services (EMS) workers were injured or killed along roadways throughout the United States. In 2008, as with the prior 10 years, more law enforcement officers died in traffic-related incidents than from any other cause; National Law  Enforcement Officers Memorial (NLEOM, 2008) over the past 12 years, an average of one officer per month was struck and killed by a vehicle in the United States. (FBI, 2007) Preliminary firefighter fatality statistics for 2008 reflect 29 of 114 firefighters killed on duty perished in motor vehicle crashes, (USFA, 2009a) similar to figures posted in previous years. According to a 2002 study (Maguire, et al.) that aggregated data from several independent sources, at least 67 EMS providers were killed in ground transportation-related events over the 6 years from 1992 to 1997.

These sobering facts clearly demonstrate the importance of addressing vehicle characteristics and human factors for reducing the morbidity and mortality of public safety personnel operating along the Nation’s highways and byways. Studies conducted in the United States and elsewhere suggest that increasing emergency vehicle visibility and conspicuity holds promise for enhancing first responders’ safety when exposed to traffic both inside and outside their response vehicles (e.g., patrol cars, motorcycles, fire apparatus, and ambulances).

This report, produced in partnership between the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) and the International Fire Service Training Association (IFSTA), with support from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), National Institute of Justice (NIJ), analyzes emergency vehicle visibility and conspicuity with an eye toward expanding efforts in these areas to improve vehicle and roadway operations safety for all emergency responders. Emphasis in this report is placed on passive visibility/conspicuity treatments; additional studies are underway on active technologies such as emergency vehicle warning lighting systems. (USFA, 2009b).”

…continues on the website

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