A Compendium of Sexual Assault Research – RAND – December 2009

Posted on December 31, 2009. Filed under: Violence | Tags: , |

A Compendium of Sexual Assault Research
By: Margaret C. Harrell, Laura Werber Castaneda, Marisa Adelson, Sarah Gaillot, Charlotte Lynch, Amanda Pomeroy
RAND Corporation   ISBN/EAN: 9780833047922   Pages: 318   Document Number: TR-617-OSD    Year: 2009

“Recognition of the prevalence and pernicious effects of sexual assault, and especially of acquaintance rape, has increased dramatically since the early 1990s. During this time, a large volume of research has enhanced understanding of the problem. This volume summarizes recent studies on sexual assault that the authors deem useful and relevant to the U.S. Department of Defense and other policymakers interested in sexual assault issues. The authors provide a brief overview of the prevalence and effects of sexual assault, and of important events and laws pertaining to sexual assault in both the civilian and military sectors. They then discuss the research that has been conducted on ten aspects of sexual assault, including its prevalence, victim and perpetrator characteristics and risk factors, prevention, recovery and coping, and the responses of the health care, law enforcement, and criminal justice systems. Finally, in this compendium’s annotated bibliography, the authors summarize more than 450 studies of sexual assault, tailoring their descriptions of research from a variety of fields for an audience of policymakers and informed lay readers.”

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Changing the translational research landscape: a review of the impacts of Biomedical Research Centres in England – RAND Corporation – 2009

Posted on November 24, 2009. Filed under: Research | Tags: , |

Changing the translational research landscape: a review of the impacts of Biomedical Research Centres in England – RAND Corporation – 2009
By: Sonja Marjanovic, Bryony Soper, Ala’a Shehabi, Claire Celia, Anais Reding, Tom Ling

“This report describes a review of the Biomedical Research Centres (BRC) scheme, undertaken for the DH 18 months after the BRCs were commissioned. This review was a perceptions audit of senior executives involved in the scheme, and explored whether the scheme is working in the way intended. It considered how translational research and innovation were pursued prior to the BRC scheme (including the opportunities and barriers experienced in the past by NHS and academic partners); whether and how institutional relationships are changing because of the scheme; and (if so) how these changes are influencing the health research system. The information obtained through our interviews suggests that the BRC scheme is already contributing to observable changes in institutional relationships between the NHS, academia, industry and other players, and is helping shape the health research system to pursue translational research and innovation with the clear goal of realising patient benefit. The scheme, and the associated changes in stakeholder relationships it has fostered, is also making a significant contribution to capacity-building in the health research system, and is leading to improved resource-targeting, management and governance.”

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Contents

Chapter One:
The BRC review context

Chapter Two:
Collaboration dynamics: changes in institutional relationships between the NHS, academia and industry

Chapter Three:
The impact of the BRC scheme and of associated changes in institutional relationships on capacity-building

Chapter Four:
The impact of BRCs on resource-targeting, management and governance

Chapter Five:
On reflection

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Evaluating Grant Peer Review in the Health Sciences: A review of the literature RAND Corporation, August 2009

Posted on August 24, 2009. Filed under: Research | Tags: , |

Evaluating Grant Peer Review in the Health Sciences: A review of the literature RAND Corporation, August 2009
By: Sharif Ismail, Alice Farrands, Steven Wooding

“More than 95% of the £2 billion of public funding for medical research each year in the UK is allocated by peer review. Long viewed as a respected process of quality assurance for research, grant peer review has lately been criticised by a growing number of people within the scientific community and without. Detractors highlight its perceived inefficiency, and structural flaws that compromise its effectiveness in allocating funding. This report presents the findings of a wide-ranging literature review to evaluate these criticisms. It concludes with a short discussion of simple modifications to the peer review process that might help to address some of them. The research for the report was conducted with funding support from RAND Europe’s Health R&D Policy Research Unit with the Department of Health (England). It is available in English only.:

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A National Agenda for Public Health Systems Research on Emergency Preparedness – RAND Corporation – August 2009

Posted on August 17, 2009. Filed under: Disaster Management, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion, Research | Tags: , |

A National Agenda for Public Health Systems Research on Emergency Preparedness – RAND Corporation – August
By: Joie Acosta, Christopher Nelson, Ellen Burke Beckjord, Shoshana R. Shelton, Erin Murphy, Kristin J. Leuschner, Jeffrey Wasserman    126 p.    Document Number: TR-660-DHHS    2009

“Improving public health emergency preparedness is at the top of the national agenda, but the lack of frequent opportunities to observe and learn from real-world responses to large-scale public health emergencies has hindered the development of an adequate evidence base. As a result, efforts to develop performance measures and standards, best practices, program guidance, training, and other tools have proceeded without a strong empirical and analytical basis. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response asked RAND to facilitate the development of a public health systems research agenda for emergency preparedness, identify short- and long-term research priorities, and provide a basis for coordinating funders and researchers inside and outside the federal government. In response, RAND convened a panel of 13 experts representing a diverse range of perspectives. The panelists identified 20 research priorities and illustrative research questions in areas related to planning, response, resources and infrastructure, and accountability and improvement. Preparations for the panel discussion included an extensive literature review of peer-reviewed sources and statutes, policies, and other government and organizational reports.”

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Risk Communication in the Early Stages of the H1N1 (Swine Flu) Alert – How Effective Were State and Local Public Health Departments? – US – August 2009

Posted on August 14, 2009. Filed under: Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

Risk Communication in the Early Stages of the H1N1 (Swine Flu) Alert – How Effective Were State and Local Public Health  Departments?
By: Jeanne S. Ringel, Elizabeth Trentacost, Nicole Lurie

Presents an assessment of how effectively state and local health departments communicated information regarding the April 2009 H1N1 virus (swine flu) outbreak via the Web to their constituents.

RAND Corporation   3 p.    Document Number: RB-9466   Year: 2009

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Issues and Ideas on Innovation: Informing the NHS Next Stage Review – RAND – August 2009

Posted on August 10, 2009. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement | Tags: , |

Issues and Ideas on Innovation: Informing the NHS Next Stage Review
RAND Corporation August 2009
By: Jonathan Grant, Philipp-Bastian Brutscher, Annalijn Conklin, Michael Hallsworth, Anna-Marie Vilamovska, Evi Hatziandreu
34 p.     Document Number: DB-554-DH

“This document briefing, prepared for the Department of Health, presents a ‘think piece’ on the key issues and ideas on innovation in the NHS. The objective of the work was to provide a challenge function for the Department of Health on its work around innovation for the NHS Next Stage Review . The issues and ideas are grounded in theory or empirical evidence and, where possible, supported by examples. This report does not purport to be a systematic review of innovation theory, but should be of interest to policymakers in the Department who are concerned with innovation, especially in the context of health systems.”

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Public Health Preparedness and Response to Chemical and Radiological Incidents: Functions, Practices, and Areas for Future Work – RAND – 2009

Posted on August 6, 2009. Filed under: Disaster Management, Environmental Health, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Public Health Preparedness and Response to Chemical and Radiological Incidents: Functions, Practices, and Areas for Future Work
By: Tom LaTourrette, Lynn E. Davis, David R. Howell, Preethi R. Sama, David J. Dausey
RAND Corporation 2009    66 p.  Document Number: TR-719-DHHS

“One area of public health emergency preparedness that has not been examined in depth is preparedness for incidents involving the release of chemical or radiological substances. Past experience — with chemical and nuclear plant accidents, train collisions, product tampering, and chemical terrorism — shows that such incidents can have serious public health consequences. This report focuses on the roles of the public health service in emergency preparedness and its response to chemical and radiological incidents. The authors develop a functional framework for public health roles in such incidents by aligning the capabilities and roles of the public health service with the emergency preparedness and response activities that would be required for those incidents. They use this framework to examine representative state and local public health department practices and to identify areas where further practice development may be warranted.”

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Study on the requirements and options for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) application in healthcare: Final report – RAND – 20 July 2009

Posted on July 21, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: , |

Study on the requirements and options for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) application in healthcare: Final report – RAND – 20 July 2009

By: Constantijn van Oranje-Nassau, Helen Rebecca Schindler, Lorenzo Valeri, Anna-Marie Vilamovska, Evi Hatziandreu, Annalijn Conklin

“This report provides an assessment of the main drivers, obstacles and uncertainties surrounding the deployment of RFID in healthcare in Europe. It identifies the most promising RFID applications in healthcare delivery by reviewing potential for increasing patient safety and the reduction of costs. The analysis is based on a thorough review of academic and grey literature and available data sets, a Delphi survey of experts followed by semi-structured key informant interviews, and seven case studies of RFID applications across Europe and the US. The report assesses individual cases to identify the potential and real costs and benefits of RFID deployment in healthcare, as well as the critical success and failure factors of RFID implementation programmes in practice. A framework is presented for conducting actual cost-benefit analyses in the future and to stimulate the effective monitoring and capturing of cost-benefit data in care delivery settings.”

Contents

Chapter One:
Introduction

Chapter Two:
Deploying RFID in Healthcare in Europe: Drivers, obstacles and critical uncertainties

Chapter Three:
Assessing the costs and benefits of RFID: a review of case studies

Chapter Four:
Identifying the most promising RFID applications in healthcare

Appendix A:
List of interviewees

Appendix B:
Delphi methodology and results

Appendix C:
Case Study RFID Application Descriptions

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Health Departments Get Mixed Marks for Using Web to Communicate About Flu Crisis – RAND US – 7 July 2009

Posted on July 8, 2009. Filed under: Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu | Tags: |

FOR RELEASE
Tuesday  July 7, 2009

Health Departments Get Mixed Marks for Using Web to Communicate About Flu Crisis

State and local health departments get mixed marks for efforts to convey information about the H1N1 virus to the public using their Web sites immediately after U.S. officials declared a public health emergency in April, according to a new RAND Corporation study.”    … continues on the website

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Support for Students Exposed to Trauma: The SSET Program – US – 2009

Posted on June 29, 2009. Filed under: Mental Health Psychi Psychol | Tags: |

Support for Students Exposed to Trauma: The SSET Program
By: Lisa H. Jaycox, Audra Langley, Kristin L. Dean   RAND Corporation, 2009
Document Number: TR-675-NIMH   Year: 2009   Series: (Technical) Reports   ISBN/EAN: 9780833047328

“Exposure to community and interpersonal violence is a public health crisis that adversely affects many children in American communities. After witnessing or experiencing trauma, many children experience symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and depression, behavioral problems, substance abuse, and poor school performance. The Support for Students Exposed to Trauma (SSET) program is a series of ten lessons whose structured approach aims to reduce distress resulting from exposure to trauma. Designed to be implemented by teachers or school counselors in groups of 8–10 middle school students, the program includes a wide variety of skill-building techniques geared toward changing maladaptive thoughts and promoting positive behaviors. It is also intended to increase levels of peer and parent support for affected students.

Designed for SSET group leaders, the Group Leader Training Manual introduces the SSET concept and provides detailed information on selecting student participants, scheduling lessons, assuring confidentiality, coordinating with clinical backup, managing difficult situations and issues, and conducting group meetings. The Lesson Plans section supplies group leader preparation information and in-depth plans for each lesson, including agendas, example scenarios, suggestions for troubleshooting specific problems, homework assignment instructions, and cross-references to other program documentation. Take-home worksheets, letters to parents, forms, and other program materials are supplied in the section entitled Lesson Worksheets and Materials.”

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The Effects of Substance Use on Workplace Injuries Cover: The Effects of Substance Use on Workplace Injuries – RAND – June 2009

Posted on June 12, 2009. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Occupational Hlth Safety | Tags: |

The Effects of Substance Use on Workplace Injuries Cover: The Effects of Substance Use on Workplace Injuries
By: Rajeev Ramchand, Amanda Pomeroy, Jeremy Arkes    RAND Corporation
Pages: 53
Document Number: OP-247-ADHS
Year: 2009
“Occupational injuries are a serious public-health issue and cause significant morbidity and mortality in the United States. In 2004, there were 3.4 million admissions to emergency rooms for job-related injuries and illnesses, a number that reflects an estimated rate of 2.5 admissions per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers aged 15 and older. In 2005, private industry employers reported 1.2 million injuries and illnesses that required days away from work, representing 135.7 per 10,000 FTE workers. The same year, data from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries estimated that there were approximately four occupational-injury deaths per 100,000 employed workers, which represented a total of 5,702 such deaths that year. The costs of occupational injuries and illnesses in the United States exceed $100 billion annually and entail both direct and indirect costs borne by injured workers, their families, other workers through lower wages, firms through lower profits, and consumers through higher prices. This paper describes associations between substance use and occupational injuries and proposes reasons that substance use may be linked to work-related accidents; reviews the most-recent empirical literature that has attempted to document the relationship between substance use and occupational injuries; highlights findings that are consistent across studies and addresses the limitations that most of these studies confront; examines the policies that attempt to address substance use at the workplace and why each initiative may or may not influence rates of occupational injuries; and discusses what remains unknown about the relationship between substance use and occupational injuries and identifies future avenues for research that could help fill some of these research gaps.”

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Value of Pharmaceutical Innovation: The Access Effects, Diffusion Process, and Health Effects of New Drugs

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

Value of Pharmaceutical Innovation: The Access Effects, Diffusion Process, and Health Effects of New Drugs RAND corporation Document RGSD-242 2009

By: Ze Cong

“This dissertation consists of three papers concerning the introduction of new drugs. The first paper investigates the access effects of new drugs, estimating the increase in the number of prescriptions and the number of people taking medications at various drug class levels due to a single new-drug approval. The author finds that more creative drugs (e.g., new chemical entities) have larger and more significant access effects, whereas less creative drugs have no significant effects. The second paper considers the value of pharmaceutical innovations by investigating the drug adoption patterns of atorvastatin among different patient subgroups over time. The author finds that in assessing the value of pharmaceutical innovations, a dynamic approach examining effectiveness over time is preferred to a static approach. In the third paper, the author compares the clinical and access-expansion effects for a systematically chosen list of drugs using claims data and the clinical trials literature. Although most of the drugs studied offer clinical benefits, the effect of new drug introductions on the number of patients treated accounts for a substantial majority of the value created by new drugs.”

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Centerpiece: Health Information Technology Savings Dwarf Costs over the First 15 Years, Then Keep Growing – RAND Review Spring 2009

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Informatics | Tags: |

Centerpiece: Health Information Technology Savings Dwarf Costs over the First 15 Years, Then Keep Growing

RAND Review  Spring 2009 — Vol. 33, No. 1 [pdf 3.3 MB]

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Advanced Care: The Promise of Health Information Technology for Cost, Quality, and Privacy – RAND Review Spring 2009

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: |

Advanced Care: The Promise of Health Information Technology for Cost, Quality, and Privacy

By Richard Hillestad and Federico Girosi

RAND Review  Spring 2009 — Vol. 33, No. 1 [pdf 3.3 MB]

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Mapping the impact: Exploring the payback of arthritis research RAND Corporation 2009

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Research, Rheumatology | Tags: , |

Mapping the impact: Exploring the payback of arthritis research RAND Corporation document MG-862-ARC 2009

By: Steven Wooding, Edward Nason, Tony Starkey, Stephen Hanney, Jonathan Grant

“The decision of the Arthritis Research campaign (arc) to map its entire research portfolio and analyze the returns and outcomes associated with individual investments was ground-breaking. Nothing similar had been attempted by other major funding organisations and there was no freely available tool for the task, this report describes the tool that was developed to carry out this task, the RAND/ARC Impact Scoring System (RAISS). The mapping tool had to be capable of producing data that would stand up to sophisticated analysis while imposing minimal time and cost burdens on administrators, researchers and data processors. The final tool took the form of a simple, tick-box-based Web questionnaire that took most researchers less than an hour to complete. The impact map generated by the tool enables arc to see the returns from individual grants and compare different types of grant. The charity intends to use accumulated data to inform its funding strategy and project Evaluation.”

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Study on the requirements and options for RFID application in healthcare – RAND, 2009

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: , |

Study on the requirements and options for RFID application in healthcare: Identifying areas for Radio Frequency Identification deployment in health care delivery: A review of relevant literature RAND Corporate Technical Report TR-608-EC 2009

By: Anna-Marie Vilamovska, Evi Hatziandreu, Helen Rebecca Schindler, Constantijn van Oranje-Nassau, Han de Vries, Joachim Krapels

“This document is the first deliverable of the RFID & Health project. It provides an overview of the state of the art in RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) applications in healthcare delivery.

Some 325 sources have been reviewed in order to draft three ‘long-lists’ of applications, enablers and barriers of RFID deployment. In the next phase of the project, these will be validated and prioritised through expert interviews and a Delphi survey. Case studies will be used to further assess the costs and benefits of the most promising applications.

The list of sources which have been reviewed for this report is believed to cover all important scientific publications, policy documents and relevant articles from the professional press, in Europe, North America and Asia, related to the topic of RFID applications in healthcare. In addition, more general literature on RFID — technology, market, enablers and barriers — has also been covered.

Primarily, the report provides a basis for the rest of the study. As a stand-alone document it gives the reader an overview of all relevant issues related to RFID deployment in healthcare delivery. The line is deliberately drawn not to include the pharmaceutical industry, counterfeiting of drugs and tracking of medical devices as they move through the supply chain. This study is primarily focused on the delivery of patient care, mostly within the context of the hospital, but also including telemedicine applications.”

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Participatory Health Research: International Observatory on Health Research Systems – RAND corporation Technical Report TR 667 2009

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Patient Participation, Research | Tags: |

Participatory Health Research: International Observatory on Health Research Systems RAND corporation Technical Report TR 667 2009 prepared for the UK Department of Health

By: Sharif Ismail

“This document is a thematic report that provides an overview of public participation in health research. The report is part of a series available from RAND Europe’s Observatory on Health Research Systems. The purpose of the document is to provide non-specialists with an overview of the evolution and development of participatory health research across a range of economically developed countries. The report is divided broadly into two parts. The first part addresses the rationale for involving lay participants in health research in the first place, and explores some of the drivers underpinning recent moves to bolster participatory research methods. It also highlights some of the advantages and disadvantages of participatory approaches. The second part includes a series of country case studies, covering current patient and service-user involvement practices in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The report concludes with a review of some options available to policymakers looking to boost or improve current practices, and an outline of further research needs. The report will be of interest to government officials dealing with health research policy, medical research councils, health research charities, institutions hosting health research projects, researchers, and patients and service users themselves.”

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Costs and benefits of health technology information – May 2009 – report done by RAND on behalf of the Health Foundation

Posted on May 12, 2009. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Informatics | Tags: , |

Costs and benefits of health technology information : an updated systematic review [675kb PDF]
An updated systematic review Author Paul G Shekelle and Caroline L Goldzweig Date published May 2009
The Health Foundation [UK]

“This report summarises the available international evidence on the costs and benefits of clinical health information technology (HIT) systems. This study has been undertaken by RAND on behalf of the Health Foundation and updates their 2005 study.

Background
The use of health information technology has been promoted as having tremendous promise in improving the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, quality and safety of medical care delivery. The promise of IT systems may be substantial, but across Europe healthcare leaders report problems with implementation. As such, gains in quality improvement through integrated and effective IT are not being realised.

This report
This report aims to gather the lessons learnt on the effects of HIT to costs and benefits that might be of use to organisations looking to develop and implement HIT programmes. This is a difficult exercise considering the multiple factors affecting implementation of an HIT programme. Factors include organisational characteristics, the kinds of changes being put in place and how they are managed, and the type of HIT system.

The report finds that barriers to HIT implementation are still substantial but that some progress has been made on reporting the organisational factors crucial for the adoption of HIT. However, there is a challenge to adapt the studies and publications from HIT leaders (early implementers and people using HIT to best effect) to offer lessons beyond their local circumstances. The report also finds limited data on the cost-effectiveness of HIT.

About QQUIP
This report is published as part of the Health Foundation’s Quest for Quality and Improved Performance (QQUIP) project. The QQUIP programme synthesises the international evidence about interventions to improve healthcare to ask which ones work to improve quality. Other reports analyse whether we are getting value for money from investment in the NHS. The QQUIP online database draws together the current data on quality and performance.

Who should read this report?
This report is intended for healthcare decision makers, including policy makers and managers. They should use this independent source of evidence to inform decisions and take actions that will lead to better quality of patient care.”

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Drug Education Also Helps Curb Risky Sexual Behavior – RAND study

Posted on May 4, 2009. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Preventive Healthcare | Tags: |

Drug Education Also Helps Curb Risky Sexual Behavior

“School-based drug education programs for adolescents can have a long-term positive impact on sexual behavior in addition to curbing substance abuse, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

Researchers found that young adults who had been exposed to a popular drug abuse prevention program as adolescents were less likely to engage in risky sexual behavior five to seven years later, according to the findings published online by the Journal of Adolescent Health. The study provides the strongest evidence to date that drug abuse prevention programs can also curb risky sexual practices in young adulthood.

“The lessons these young people learned about how to avoid drug and alcohol abuse appears to have had a positive impact on their sexual behavior as well,” said Phyllis Ellickson, the lead author of the study and a researcher at RAND, a nonprofit research organization.

The study found that youth exposed to a drug abuse education program were significantly less likely as young adults to either engage in sex with multiple partners or to have unprotected sex because of drug and alcohol use than their peers who had not received the training.

However, researchers found that those who received drug prevention training were no more likely to use condoms consistently than their peers who did not receive the training. ”

Abstract

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Initial Evaluation of the Cities Readiness Initiative – March 2009

Posted on April 29, 2009. Filed under: Disaster Management, Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Initial Evaluation of the Cities Readiness Initiative

By: Henry H. Willis, Christopher Nelson, Shoshana R. Shelton, Andrew M. Parker, John A. Zambrano, Edward W. Chan, Jeffrey Wasserman, Brian A. Jackson

RAND Corporation  March 2009

The Cities Readiness Initiative (CRI) was created in 2004 to help the nation’s largest metropolitan areas develop the ability to provide life-saving medications in the event of a large-scale biological terrorist attack or naturally occurring disease outbreak. In 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asked RAND to provide an initial evaluation of the impact of the Cities Readiness Initiative on awardees’ readiness and capability to conduct mass countermeasure dispensing above and beyond what would be the case without the program. The subsequent study drew on available empirical evidence, including data from the Technical Assistance Review, a CDC-administered assessment of jurisdictions’ capabilities in 12 core functional areas associated with countermeasure distribution and dispensing, as well as qualitative data collected through discussions with personnel involved with countermeasure dispensing in nine metropolitan areas (both CRI awardees and non-CRI jurisdictions). The evaluation showed that, overall, CRI awardees had benefited from the program’s preparedness guidance and scenario focus and that the program had strengthened or encouraged the development of partnerships with other stakeholders. The program also encouraged a variety of changes to awardees’ training plans and had spillover effects on non-CRI sites. However, this evaluation did not address questions of how the documented benefits compare to the program costs.

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The Effect of Regulation on Pharmaceutical Revenues – Experience in Nineteen Countries

Posted on April 16, 2009. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

The Effect of Regulation on Pharmaceutical Revenues – Experience in Nineteen Countries

By: Neeraj Sood, Han de Vries, Italo Gutierrez, Darius N. Lakdawalla, Dana P. Goldman

We describe pharmaceutical regulations in nineteen developed countries from 1992 to 2004 and analyze how different regulations affect pharmaceutical revenues. First, there has been a trend toward increased regulation. Second, most regulations reduce pharmaceutical revenues significantly. Third, since 1994, most countries adopting new regulations already had some regulation in place. We find that incremental regulation of this kind had a smaller impact on costs. However, introducing new regulations in a largely unregulated market, such as the United States, could greatly reduce pharmaceutical revenues. Finally, we show that the cost-reducing effects of price controls increase the longer they remain in place.

Reprinted with permission from Health Affairs, Vol. 28, No. 1, January/February 2009.

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Demonstrating and Communicating Research Impact: Preparing NIOSH Programs for External Review

Posted on April 16, 2009. Filed under: Occupational Hlth Safety, Research | Tags: |

Demonstrating and Communicating Research Impact: Preparing NIOSH Programs for External Review

This book describes the methodology that RAND researchers developed to help the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) research programs demonstrate and communicate the impact of their activities. The methodology is based on the use of logic models, outcome worksheets, and outcome narratives as key tools in preparing evidence packages that describe the contribution that NIOSH research activities have made in reducing occupational illnesses, injuries, and fatalities.

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Improving Patient Safety in the EU – Assessing the expected effects of three policy areas for future action

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Patient Safety | Tags: |

By: Annalijn Conklin, Anna-Marie Vilamovska, Han de Vries, Evi Hatziandreu

This report, written and published in English in 2008, was prepared for the Health and Consumer Protection Commission (DG SANCO) in support of their Impact Assessment of the Patient Safety and Quality Legislative proposal for 2008. It presents our findings of a study in which we assess the expected effects of three policy areas for future action towards improving patient safety in the EU-27. Our study was informed by a mixture of methods, including the existing European and international studies and evaluations on patient safety and related initiatives, as well as primary qualitative data based on 32 key informant interviews with identified experts. The report will allow patient safety experts, DG SANCO, and other interested stakeholders to understand the extent to which it is possible to provide a clear and compelling account of the expected impacts of (1) establishing effective reporting and learning systems, (2) redress mechanisms, and (3) developing and using knowledge and evidence at the EU level.

RAND Corporation, Technical Report, 2008  TR-596-EC

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Occupational Safety and Health for Public Safety Employees: Assessing the Evidence and the Implications for Public Policy

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Occupational Hlth Safety | Tags: |

Occupational Safety and Health for Public Safety Employees: Assessing the Evidence and the Implications for Public Policy

Tom LaTourrette, David S. Loughran, Seth A. Seabury

RAND corporation report 2008   ISBN 978-0-8330-4621-5

From the preface:
The provision of public safety is one of the most important responsibilities of government, and workers charged with  protecting the public, such as police officers and firefighters, are routinely asked to put their own lives at risk. As such, it is no surprise that public safety employees tend to face some of the highest risks of fatal and nonfatal injury. It is therefore an important goal of policymakers to determine ways to help protect public safety employees from work-related illnesses and disease without compromising their ability to do their jobs.

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Medical Research: What’s it worth?

Posted on March 25, 2009. Filed under: Research | Tags: , , , |

This report provides the first quantitative estimates of the economic benefits of public and charitably funded medical research in the UK. Acting on the recommendation of the UK Evaluation Forum, the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council and the Academy of Medical Sciences commissioned this study to develop methodology and calculate the economic benefits of public and charitably funded medical research in the UK.

Health Economics Research Group, Office of Health Economics, RAND Europe.
Medical Research: What’s it worth? Estimating the economic benefits from medical research in
the UK.

London: UK Evaluation Forum; 2008.   ISBN 978 1 84129 080 5

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