Which doctors take up promising ideas? New insights from open data – Nesta – 28 January 2014

Posted on March 4, 2014. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, General Practice, Knowledge Translation, Primary Hlth Care | Tags: , |

Which doctors take up promising ideas? New insights from open data – Nesta – 28 January 2014

“The report looks at early adoption of promising new ideas across primary care in England and argues that analysing open data can help public services gain a greater understanding of their take up of innovations.

Key findings
No single group of GP practices were serial early adopters of all the innovations reviewed, but groups of early adopters were identified around specific types of innovations.
Larger GP practices are in a better position to explore and introduce new innovations, while neighbouring practices tended to have similar rates and patterns of adopting new innovations.
GPs rely on a range of resources to identify and learn about innovations – including informal local networks, personal relationships, and information systems. Fellow GPs and national guidance were particularly influential sources of information.
Local intermediaries – such as Academic Health Science Networks and Clinical Commissioning Groups – have an important role to play in the adoption process.

This report demonstrates a rising opportunity to inform practitioners and patients by making use of open data. Analysis of primary care open data shows the potential to chart GP surgeries’ uptake of promising innovations in technologies, drugs and practices.”

… continues

 

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The challenges of evidence: provocation paper for the Alliance for Useful Evidence, NESTA – November 2013

Posted on December 3, 2013. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice | Tags: , |

The challenges of evidence: provocation paper for the Alliance for Useful Evidence, NESTA – November 2013

by Dr Ruth Levitt

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Standards of Evidence: an approach that balances the need for evidence with innovation – Nesta – October 2013

Posted on November 19, 2013. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice | Tags: , |

Standards of Evidence: an approach that balances the need for evidence with innovation – Nesta – October 2013

“This paper provides an overview of the Nesta Standards of Evidence. Our aim is to find alignment with academically recognised levels of rigour, whilst managing to ensure impact measurement is appropriate to the stage of development of a variety of different products, services and programmes.”

… continues

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Networks that work: partnerships for integrated care and services – Nesta – August 2013

Posted on September 4, 2013. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , , , |

Networks that work: partnerships for integrated care and services – Nesta – August 2013

“This report shows how consortia work in practice, what the barriers are and how these barriers can be overcome.

Case studies detail how networks can support the integration of care and services in different ways, including commissioning services together, providing services together and delivering services together.

The work of the People Powered Health teams has shown that three core actions are necessary for partnerships to be successful – establishing a common purpose, developing a shared culture and enabling information sharing and open dialogue.”

 

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Gripes, grumbles and grievances: the role of complaints in transforming public services – Nesta – April 2013

Posted on April 29, 2013. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality | Tags: , |

Gripes, grumbles and grievances: the role of complaints in transforming public services – Nesta – April 2013

by Richard Simmons and Carol Brennan

“Complaints are not often associated with innovation and creativity. When we think of complaints, we tend towards negative association – frustration, failure, poor service, something to be dealt with promptly and filed away. Receiving lots of complaints is seen as something to be wary of, not celebrated.

But getting complaints is much better than not getting complaints – they show that people think it’s worth complaining and that they will be listened to, and that they believe that they have power to influence the system. They are a good sign of democracy in action.

This report looks at the role of complaints in transforming public services.”

Nesta blog entry on complaints in public services – 25 April 2013

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The Business Case for People Powered Health – Nesta – April 2013

Posted on April 18, 2013. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Health Economics, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: |

The Business Case for People Powered Health – Nesta – April 2013

“The Business Case for People Powered Health describes the specific investments required to create services with a People Powered Health approach, and the practical benefits that can be achieved as a result.

The NHS in England could realise savings of at least £4.4bn a year if it adopted People Powered Health innovations that involve patients, their families and communities more directly in the management of long term health conditions. These savings are based on the most reliable evidence and represent a 7% reduction in terms of reduced A&E attendance, planned and unplanned admissions, and outpatient admissions..

There is therefore both a social and financial imperative to scale the People Powered Health approach.

The People Powered Health approach involves five areas of practice: More than medicine (new services), People helping people (peer support), Redefining consultations, networks and partnerships, and user co-design and co-delivery. The most robust research literature focuses on two of these – redefining consultations and peer support – and suggests these types of interventions can improve health outcomes in all the most common long-term conditions, with patients more stable, less prone to exacerbation and demonstrating improvements in their core clinical indicators. As a result, there is a reduction in the cost of delivering healthcare of approximately 7 per cent of the commissioning budget – through decreasing A&E attendances, reducing hospital admissions, reduced length of stay and decreased patient attendances. Putting this into practice would save the NHS £4.4 billion across England.

However, we think that the People Powered Health approach could achieve even higher savings. This is both because the median of all available evidence, including less robust studies, suggests the cost of managing patients with long-term conditions could be reduced by up to 20 per cent, and the experience of the six sites suggests People Powered Health interventions are enablers of each other at scale.”

Working with patients to manage long-term conditions could save the NHS £4.4bn a year – Guardian – 11 April 2013

“People Powered Health is an approach that can improve quality of life and save the NHS money

The health system is going through significant upheaval and crisis provoked by the combined impact of the NHS reforms and the Francis Inquiry. The result is a sense of unease and uncertainty despite the NHS ranking excellently in international terms. At a recent Lord Darzi discussion on primary care, the mood was summed up as: ‘Why does it feel so bad, if we’re actually doing so well?’

Part of the answer is that the NHS is good at dealing with acute and infectious disease, but is still finding its way towards a model that effectively manages long-term conditions. Another element is the challenge of nurturing compassion in large, formal institutions, where staff are under considerable financial pressure.

People Powered Health is an approach to health and care that addresses both issues.”

… continues on the site

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Doctor Know: a knowledge commons in health – Nesta – March 2013

Posted on April 9, 2013. Filed under: Health Informatics, Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Doctor Know: a knowledge commons in health – Nesta – March 2013

Authors: John Loder, Laura Bunt and Jeremy C Wyatt

“The way we create, access and share information is changing rapidly. Every time we look something up on Wikipedia, rate an experience on Tripadvisor or enter search terms in Google, we are taking advantage of the increasingly sophisticated way in which technology and digital tools are allowing us to capture, refine, synthesise and structure our collective intelligence.

With the ongoing advances of the semantic web, new sources of and different applications for data and cultural shifts towards greater openness and transparency, our capacity for creating and navigating complex knowledge grows.

These trends in the creation and application of knowledge have huge implications for how we access, create and apply information in health, a field where knowledge held by patients, doctors, medical researchers, nurses, carers, community providers, families and others is all critical in improving our individual health and well-being. Where information is vast and complex – and the need for accuracy and reliability can be a matter of life and death – our ability to orchestrate knowledge in a useful way is a central concern for any health system.

In partnership with The Young Foundation and the Institute for Digital Healthcare at Warwick University, this paper argues that society’s growing ability to mobilise knowledge from different fields and sources is beginning to show the potential of a ‘knowledge commons’ in healthcare: an open system of knowledge with researchers, practicing clinicians, patients, their families and communities all involved in capturing, refining and utilising a common body of knowledge in real time. We set out what this might mean in practice, and steps we should take to get there.”

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5 Hours a day: systemic innovation for an ageing population – Nesta – February 2013

Posted on March 6, 2013. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: |

5 Hours a day: systemic innovation for an ageing population – Nesta – February 2013

“With life expectancies increasing by five hours a day and Baby Boomers entering their later years, our assumptions about ageing and who is ‘old’ are fundamentally challenged. Moving beyond chronology as a way of understanding age will be a key shift as we move to an older society. And we need to innovate to enable us to adapt to an ageing population, including recreating our social institutions and creating ways for people to help one another to harness the opportunities of an ageing society and enable all of us to age better.”

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Working towards People Powered Health – Nesta – November 2012

Posted on November 20, 2012. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: |

Working towards People Powered Health – Nesta – November 2012

“People Powered Health is about creating a healthcare system in which clinicians and patients collaborate to enable people to live better with their conditions. We know that ‘co-production’ is challenging for both professionals and for patients.

This resource focuses on the challenges for professionals and, in particular, how workforce culture needs to change to enable co-production to move from the margins to the mainstream. We asked a range of experts – clinical, academic, policy as well as commissioners and service providers – to write down their ideas about the relationship between co-production and workforce culture. We were interested in the extent to which they thought culture is a barrier and what can be done about it. The responses are an interesting snapshot of the perspectives of experienced professionals working in and around co-production and health. Some focus on incentive structures, such as recruitment, training and appraisal systems, while others focus on less tangible changes to professional practice, culture and behaviour.”

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The Human Factor – how transforming healthcare to involve the public can save money and save lives – discussion paper – 4 November 2009

Posted on November 10, 2009. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement | Tags: |

The Human Factor – how transforming healthcare to involve the public can save money and save lives – discussion paper
Author:  Laura Bunt and Michael Harris
Published: 4 November 2009
National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts

Introduction

“The National Health Service (NHS) needs to save £15 billion to £20 billion over the next few years. This paper argues that these savings could be achieved through radical patient-centred service redesign and more effective approaches to public behaviour change. However, these approaches are difficult to develop within the existing health service.

NESTA’s experience of working with leading companies and developing projects in healthcare demonstrates that radical new ways of innovating that give genuine power to frontline staff, patients and the public are necessary to make these approaches widespread. This would unlock the savings we need and improve the nation’s health.”

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Innovation that matters. How innovation is currently supported in an ageing society 28 April 2009

Posted on May 5, 2009. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: , |

Innovation that matters. How innovation is currently supported in an ageing society Full report (pdf)
Author:
The original research was conducted by Deloitte and the summary was produced by Dr Michael Harris, NESTA. (NESTA – National endowment for Science Technology and the Arts – a unique and independent body with a mission to make the UK more innovative.)

Published:  28 April 2009

Download:
Summary report: Preparing for ageing (pdf)

Description/aims

This research summary is based on a full report commissioned by NESTA from Deloitte.

It describes the challenge of an ageing society, assesses the role that innovation is currently playing in meeting this challenge, and identifies where innovation needs to be harnessed more fully.

It covers the public, private and voluntary sectors, across five areas: housing; the local environment; health and social care; personal finance; and social inclusion.

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