Draft National Road Safety Strategy 2011 – 2020 – Australian Government Department of Infrastructure and Transport

Posted on February 7, 2011. Filed under: Health Policy | Tags: , , |

Draft National Road Safety Strategy 2011 – 2020 – Australian Government Department of Infrastructure and Transport

“On average, four people are killed and 80 are seriously injured every day on Australia’s roads. Almost everyone has, at some stage, been affected by a road crash.

Australian Transport Ministers have asked the heads of transport and roads agencies around the country to work together to prepare a new 10-year National Road Safety Strategy for the period from 2011 to 2020. The new strategy is intended to set an ambitious long-term vision for road safety improvement in Australia and to guide national action over the coming decade.

Transport agencies have been working hard to develop a draft National Road Safety Strategy and would like to hear from the community on its proposals.”     … continues on the site

Comment on the draft strategy from the ABC:
Call for total ban on phones while driving

 “There is a push for the use of mobile phones to be totally banned in cars, after a report found drivers using phones are at a much greater risk of crashing – even when using them hands-free.

A draft national road safety report recommended the consideration of the total ban on mobile phone use in vehicles as one of a range of strategies to cut the road toll.

Researcher Mark Stevenson from Monash University’s accident research centre says the report shows the risks to drivers.

“It’s around a fourfold increased risk if you’re holding the phone, in terms of crashing resulting in an injury,” he said.

“Hands-free, it’s around 3.7 times the risk.” ” …continues on the site

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Public Response to Alerts and Warnings on Mobile Devices: Summary of a Workshop on Current Knowledge and Research Gaps – National Academies Press – 2010

Posted on January 14, 2011. Filed under: Disaster Management | Tags: , |

Public Response to Alerts and Warnings on Mobile Devices: Summary of a Workshop on Current Knowledge and Research Gaps – National Academies Press – 2010

Committee on Public Response to Alerts and Warnings on Mobile Devices: Current Knowledge and Research Gaps; National Research Council

This book presents a summary of the Workshop on Public Response to Alerts and Warnings on Mobile Devices: Current Knowledge and Research Gaps, held April 13 and 14, 2010, in Washington, D.C., under the auspices of the National Research Council’s Committee on Public Response to Alerts and Warnings on Mobile Devices: Current Knowledge and Research Needs.

The workshop was structured to gather inputs and insights from social science researchers, technologists, emergency management professionals, and other experts knowledgeable about how the public responds to alerts and warnings, focusing specifically on how the public responds to mobile alerting.

ISBN-10: 0-309-18513-0
ISBN-13: 978-0-309-18513-4

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Using mobile phones in NHS hospitals – January 2009 UK Department of Health guidance

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: , |

Using mobile phones in NHS hospitals – January 2009

Document type:     Guidance
Author:   UK Department of Health
Published date:     6 January 2009
Pages:      12

The Department has issued new mobile phone usage good practice guidance, which replaces all previous guidance issued by the Department.

The Department wishes to reflect the rapidly developing principles of patient choice in the matter of mobile phone usage. It therefore considers that the working presumption should be that patients will be allowed the widest possible use of mobile phones in hospitals where the NHS trust’s local risk assessment indicates that such use would not represent a threat to:

* patients’ own safety or that of others,
* the operation of electrically sensitive medical devices in critical care situations,
* the levels of privacy and dignity that must be the hallmark of all NHS care.

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