Saying what you do and doing what you say: The performative dynamics of lean management theory – Universita Ca’Foscari Venezia – December 2013

Posted on January 28, 2014. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: |

Saying what you do and doing what you say: The performative dynamics of lean management theory – Universita Ca’Foscari Venezia – December 2013

“Abstract

Why are certain theories able to impose themselves and influence organizational practices in a significant way? Rooted at the intersection of inquiries into management fashions and into performativity, we investigate the case of the Québec public health care system, where a managerial theory – that of “lean management” – has recently emerged, gained saliency and become dominant in organizational practice. Adopting a longitudinal and multi-level research approach, we focus more precisely on the conditions that allow performativity to occur and increase, considering how this process unfolds over time. We therefore study the processes and the conditions through which lean management theory imposed itself, both in the global health care system and in two distinct health care organizations and the processes and the conditions through which this theory, while imposing itself, constructs a reality for these organizations, eventually reinforcing the theory itself. By unveiling the action of three performative dynamics in this particular case, our study provides a reflection on the catalysts and inhibitors of performativity, that goes beyond the specific case and that could be relevant to researchers interested by performativity.”

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Service improvement in microbiology: why, what and how – National Pathology Programme, NHS Improvement Guide – July 2012

Posted on July 18, 2012. Filed under: Pathology | Tags: , |

Service improvement in microbiology: why, what and how – National Pathology Programme, NHS Improvement Guide – July 2012

“In 2006 the Review of Pathology Services in England by Lord Carter, endorsed Lean as the method of choice for improving processes in pathology services.

Working in partnership with the Department of Health (DH) Pathology Programme, NHS Improvement has supported a number of microbiology teams, including the eight acute Trusts in the former East Midlands SHA, to learn how Lean methodology can enable the service to achieve improvements to support the QIPP, (quality, innovation, productivity and prevention) transformation programme.

Multidisciplinary teams worked collaboratively to test and implement changes that deliver improvements for patients, staff and users of the service.”

… continues

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Engineering a Learning Healthcare System: A Look at the Future – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 8 July 2011

Posted on July 11, 2011. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement | Tags: , |

Engineering a Learning Healthcare System: A Look at the Future – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 8 July 2011

full text 

“Lessons from engineering have the potential to improve both the efficiency and quality of healthcare delivery.  The fundamental notion of a high-performing healthcare system—one that increasingly is more effective, more efficient, safer, and higher quality—is rooted in continuous improvement principles that medicine shares with engineering. As technological advances and new insights into disease and individual variation increase the complexity of medicine, progress will depend on the ability to design healthcare delivery systems in which all of the components are coordinated, streamlined, efficient, and seamlessly interfaced.

As part of its Learning Health System series of workshops, the IOM’s Roundtable on Value & Science-Driven Health Care hosted a workshop, jointly with the National Academy of Engineering, on lessons from systems and operations engineering that could be applied to the organization, structure, and function of health care delivery, monitoring, and change processes. Participant discussions on the promise of, and actions necessary to implement, engineering approaches to healthcare systems improvement are summarized in this report.”

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