Behavioral Health Integration Capacity Assessment Tool – Institute for Healthcare Improvement – 2014

Posted on May 30, 2014. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , , , , |

Behavioral Health Integration Capacity Assessment Tool – Institute for Healthcare Improvement IHI – 2014

“The purpose of the Behavioral Health Integration Capacity Assessment (BHICA) is to assist behavioral health organizations in evaluating their ability to implement integrated care. The BHICA enables behavioral health organizations to evaluate their processes related to three approaches to integrated care: coordinate care, co-locate care, or build primary care capacity in-house. It also allows organizations to assess their existing operational and cultural infrastructure to support greater integration. The BHICA was developed by IHI and the Lewin Group under a contract from the CMS Medicare-Medicaid Coordination Office.”

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A Guide to Measuring the Triple Aim: Population Health, Experience of Care, and Per Capita Cost – IHI – 13 December 2012

Posted on January 8, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

A Guide to Measuring the Triple Aim: Population Health, Experience of Care, and Per Capita Cost – IHI – 13 December 2012

Stiefel M, Nolan K. A Guide to Measuring the Triple Aim: Population Health, Experience of Care, and Per Capita Cost. IHI Innovation Series white paper. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2012.

“This white paper provides a menu of suggested measures for the three dimensions of the Triple Aim. The menu is based on a combination of the analytic frameworks presented in the paper and the practical experience of the organizations participating in the IHI Triple Aim prototyping initiative. The suggested measures are accompanied by data sources and examples. The paper also describes how the measures might be used along with increasingly specific, cascading process and outcome measures for particular projects to create a learning system to achieve the Triple Aim.”

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Respectful Management of Serious Clinical Adverse Events 2nd ed – Institute for Healthcare Improvement – 2011

Posted on October 18, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Patient Safety | Tags: , |

Conway J, Federico F, Stewart K, Campbell MJ. Respectful Management of Serious Clinical Adverse Events (Second Edition). IHI Innovation Series white paper. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2011.

“This white paper introduces an overall approach and tools designed to support two processes: the proactive preparation of a plan for managing serious clinical adverse events, and the reactive emergency response of an organization that has no such plan.

Every day, clinical adverse events occur within our health care system, causing physical and psychological harm to one or more patients, their families, staff (including medical staff), the community, and the organization. In the crisis that often emerges, what differentiates organizations, positively or negatively, is their culture of safety, the role of the board of trustees and executive leadership, advanced planning for such an event, the balanced prioritization of the needs of the patient and family, staff, and organization, and how actions immediately and over time bring empathy, support, resolution, learning, and improvement. The risks of not responding to these adverse events in a timely and effective manner are significant, and include loss of trust, absence of healing, no learning and improvement, the sending of mixed messages about what is really important to the organization, increased likelihood of regulatory action or lawsuits, and challenges by the media.”

… continues on the site

Federico F, Conway J. Planning for a clinical crisis: Next steps. Healthcare Executive. 2011 Nov/Dec;26(6):74-76.

“The response to the 2010 Institute for Healthcare Improvement white paper titled  has been remarkable, as detailed below.

This article presents a summary of the learning gained since the Institute for Healthcare Improvement white paper, Respectful Management of Serious Clinical Adverse Events, was first published in 2010. The challenges remaining for clinical crisis planning along with comments on four areas of crisis management that are receiving the greatest attention are also discussed.”

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Hospital Inpatient Waste Identification Tool – IHI – 2011

Posted on April 19, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: , |

Hospital Inpatient Waste Identification Tool – IHI – 2011

Authors: Roger K. Resar, Frances A. Griffin, Andrea Kabcenell, Catherine Bones IHI

“Executive Summary
Within the US and around the world, hospital executives are facing increasing pressure to reduce operating costs and improve quality of care. Hospitals that fare best will be those that become efficient operators and reduce waste in their clinical care. Efforts are underway in many  places to reduce waste, improve efficiency, and maintain quality. In December 2009, the Health Foundation in the United Kingdom commissioned the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) to design and test a tool for identifying clinical waste within the hospital inpatient setting. Through review of existing literature, conversations with experts, and direct input from hospitals engaged in testing, IHI developed the Hospital Inpatient Waste Identification Tool. The Waste Identification Tool was designed to identify clinical and operational waste from the perspective of frontline clinical staff, with the aim of informing strategic decision making for the hospital.”   … continues

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Changing Systems, Changing Minds – Improving healthcare with IT – Institute for Healthcare Improvement – November 2009

Posted on November 17, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: |

Changing Systems, Changing Minds – Improving healthcare with IT.  Institute for Healthcare Improvement [US]
Healthcare Executive Nov / Dec 2009

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Improvement Map Launch Approaching – US Institute for Healthcare Improvement

Posted on August 19, 2009. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: , |

Improvement Map Launch Approaching … US Institute for Healthcare Improvement

“With the official launch of the IHI Improvement Map on September 15 [2009], improvers all over the world will have access to a new, interactive, web-based tool that distills the best clinical and managerial information available to help hospitals provide exceptional care. IHI has assembled an array of exciting programs – including our new membership program, Passport – to help hospitals implement key processes in the Improvement Map.”

Get a “sneak peek” at the Improvement Map

Learn about Passport and become a Charter Member before the August 31 deadline

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Raising Joy in the Health Care Workforce – IHI audio web broadcast – 9 July 2009

Posted on June 30, 2009. Filed under: Workforce | Tags: , |

Raising Joy in the Health Care Workforce
Thursday, July 9, from 2:00 – 3:00 PM Eastern Time  (US) – event can be downloaded afterwards from the Archive

Guests:
Joanne Watson, IHI Fellow and Consultant Endocrinologist, NHS
Katie Bell, Partner and Lead, Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index

“There’s nothing optional about a health care workforce that’s capable and empowered to deliver optimal care to patients. Staff members who are engaged in their jobs, have opportunities for growth and development, and feel respected by trusted colleagues and higher ups alike, go out of their way to implement best practices and, in the process, help their organizations earn reputations for best places to work.

Join WIHI host, Madge Kaplan, and experts Joanne Watson and Katie Bell, for a lively discussion of new research findings and new strategies being deployed to build  stronger connections between clinical outcomes, patient-centered care, and engaged frontline employees. Come listen, share your knowledge, and ask questions on IHI’s brand new audio “talk show” – the first of its kind devoted to capturing the best ideas for reforming the health care system through system redesign.

About WIHI
WIHI is a new free audio/web broadcast from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement that combines the best of improvement ideas with global experts, a seasoned host, and hundreds of engaged participants. The 60-minute program is offered live every other week and by download whenever it’s convenient for you to listen. Produced and hosted by Madge Kaplan, WIHI is your opportunity to meet up with colleagues who want to improve patient care and shape a true health reform agenda.”

http://www.ihi.org/events/SelectAttendee.aspx?New=1&EventId=1816

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Increasing Efficiency and Enhancing Value in Health Care: Ways to Achieve Savings in Operating Costs per Year – IHI – Jun 2009

Posted on June 15, 2009. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality | Tags: , , , |

Martin LA, Neumann CW, Mountford J, Bisognano M, Nolan TW. Increasing Efficiency and Enhancing Value in Health Care: Ways to Achieve Savings in Operating Costs per Year. IHI Innovation Series white paper. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Institute for Healthcare Improvement; 2009.

“Until recently, the rationale for health care providers to undertake quality improvement (QI) initiatives rested largely on “doing the right thing”; any financial benefit resulting from QI efforts was regarded as an attractive side effect. However, changes in the current economic environment and mounting evidence that better care can come at lower cost provide additional motivation. Thus far, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has focused efforts to make the business case for improving quality on trying to identify the “dark green dollars” (i.e., actual savings on the bottom line, as opposed to theoretical cost savings that cannot be tracked to the bottom line, or “light green dollars”) resulting from QI projects. This method has proved very challenging; although hospitals often claim cost savings from such projects, it is rarely (if ever) possible to track the savings to a specific budget line item.

A new approach to the business case is the systematic identification and elimination of waste, while maintaining or improving quality. Here, the aim is primarily financial; any positive impact on quality, while desired, is secondary. IHI’s new way of thinking about “dark green dollars” is to express the improvement aim in terms of waste reduction—that is, to identify inefficiencies in the system and remove them, rather than separating out, or not addressing, the cost of a quality improvement project and the potential savings it generates. This paper proposes a set of steps health care organizations can undertake to systematically identify and eliminate inefficiencies to create a portfolio of work leading to a 1 percent to 3 percent savings in operating costs per year. Methods for developing a balanced portfolio of projects and for calculating and tracking cost savings are also described.”

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Appropriate Use of Secondary Care Services R&D Lab – US Institute for Healthcare Improvement – July 2009

Posted on May 22, 2009. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement | Tags: |

Appropriate Use of Secondary Care Services R&D Lab – US Institute for Healthcare Improvement – July 2009

“In the US, an estimated 30% of health care costs — nearly $700 billion — represents care that could be eliminated without reducing quality. The US is not alone.

Health care costs related to secondary care are increasing yearly in many countries around the world. Unnecessary tests and procedures not only effect costs to the system but can also put the patient at risk. In Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, over 25% of patients reported they experienced problems with care coordination—many received duplicate tests or procedures, or reported that test results or medical records were not available at the time of their scheduled appointment.

How can we design care delivery to ensure appropriate care for every patient?

How do we ensure that clinicians are engaged as partners in this effort?

Research and experience indicate that a number of interventions can lead to the appropriate use of secondary care services, including:

*Shared medical decision making supported by decision aids
*Improved process of care that is embedded into workflow
*Developing stronger service agreements between primary and secondary care, for example World Class Commissioning

However, much more work needs to be done in order to reduce costs without hurting patients.

IHI is conducting extensive research and development on the appropriate use of secondary care services as recognized by the National Quality Forum’s National Priorities Partnership (NPP), an organization working to safely reduce the burden of unscientific, inappropriate, and excessive care so all Americans have access to safe and affordable healthcare. In an effort to spread and accelerate learning, we’ve launched the Appropriate Use of Secondary Care Services R&D initiative, under the umbrella of our Triple Aim initiative, which specifically focuses on two areas of overuse:

1.Unwarranted diagnostic procedures
2.Unwarranted procedures

The Appropriate Use of Secondary Care Services R&D Lab will serve as the kickoff to this new IHI initiative, providing delegates with a forum to develop further the tools, techniques, and approaches necessary to improve the use of secondary services. Topics of discussion will focus on four primary drivers for improvement: engagement of clinicians, shared decision making, care coordination, and improved process of care.”

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