NHS Atlas of Variation in Healthcare for People with Liver Disease – RightCare – March 2013

Posted on March 26, 2013. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , , , |

NHS Atlas of Variation in Healthcare for People with Liver Disease – RightCare – March 2013

“Liver Disease – a growing epidemic

Premature death from chronic liver disease is rising, largely as a result of lifestyle issues such as alcohol, drug-taking and obesity. There is significant local variation in these mortality rates, with deprivation a key factor.

During 1993-2010, there was an 88% rise in England in age-standardised mortality rate from chronic liver disease.

In 2011, the Department of Health estimated the cost of alcohol misuse to the NHS was £3.5bn. Over 24% of the population (33% of men, 16% of women) consume alcohol in a way that is potentially or actually harmful. In England, alcohol dependence affects 1m people aged 16-64 years. It is estimated that as few as 6% of these receive treatment.

Up to 10-20% of the population are potentially at some risk of developing some liver damage, while 600,000-700,000 individuals actually have a significant degree of damage.

Exposing variation

The NHS Atlas of Variation in Healthcare for People with Liver Disease uses data sets in the form of maps to reveal the extent of variations in services and outcomes.

This Atlas reveals widespread variation:

in the prevalence of risk factors for liver disease, including Hepatitis infection, obesity and alcohol abuse
in emergency admissions and routine treatments and operations
in the expenditure on liver disease services accross the NHS”

… continues on the site

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Know Hepatitis – new CDC website – February 2010

Posted on March 23, 2010. Filed under: Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , , , |

“In the report Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C , the IOM warned that lack of knowledge and awareness about hepatitis B and C can contribute to continued transmission, missed opportunities for early diagnosis and medical care, and poor health outcomes in infected people. This February, in response to the IOM’s recommendation to improve knowledge and awareness through educational programs, the CDC launched Know Hepatitis.org. This website targets community-based health care providers and social service providers on the front lines of hepatitis prevention and provides basic information about the problem of chronic viral hepatitis.”

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Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C – US – 2010

Posted on January 12, 2010. Filed under: Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C
Authors: Heather M. Colvin and Abigail E. Mitchell, Editors; Committee on the Prevention and Control of Viral Hepatitis Infections; Institute of Medicine

ISBN-10: 0-309-14628-3
ISBN-13: 978-0-309-14628-9

“The global epidemic of hepatitis B and C is a serious public health problem. Hepatitis B and C are the major causes of chronic liver disease and liver cancer in the world. In the next 10 years, 150,000 people in the United States will die from liver disease or liver cancer associated with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Today, between 800,000 and 1.4 million people in the United States have chronic hepatitis B and between 2.7 and 3.9 million have chronic hepatitis C. People most at risk for hepatitis B and C often are the least likely to have access to medical services. Reducing the rates of illness and death associated with these diseases will require greater awareness and knowledge among health care workers, improved identification of at-risk people, and improved access to medical care.

Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease. Although federal public health officials recommend that all newborns, children, and at-risk adults receive the vaccine, about 46,000 new acute cases of the HBV infection emerge each year, including 1,000 in infants who acquire the infection during birth from their HBV-positive mothers. Unfortunately, there is no vaccine for hepatitis C, which is transmitted by direct exposure to infectious blood.

Hepatitis and Liver Cancer identifies missed opportunities related to the prevention and control of HBV and HCV infections. The book presents ways to reduce the numbers of new HBV and HCV infections and the morbidity and mortality related to chronic viral hepatitis. It identifies priorities for research, policy, and action geared toward federal, state, and local public health officials, stakeholder, and advocacy groups and professional organizations.”

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