Building Health Literate Organizations: A Guidebook to Achieving Organizational Change – UnityPoint Health – 2014

Posted on August 8, 2014. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: |

Building Health Literate Organizations: A Guidebook to Achieving Organizational Change – UnityPoint Health – 2014

Abrams MA, Kurtz-Rossi S, Riffenburgh A, Savage BA.

“A health literate health care organization is described as easier for people to use, and critical to delivering patient-centered care (Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations). It supports patient-provider communication to improve health care quality, reduce errors, facilitate shared decision-making, and improve health outcomes.

This guidebook will help health care organizations of any size engage in organizational change to become health literate. It complements many excellent health literacy resources, helping you use them effectively and reliably. It includes background, resources, examples, and lessons learned to help build a health literate health care organization.”

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Building Health Literate Organizations: A Guidebook to Achieving Organizational Change – UnityPoint Health – 2014 )

Health Literacy: report from an RCGP-led health literacy workshop – June 2014

Posted on August 4, 2014. Filed under: General Practice, Patient Participation | Tags: |

Health Literacy: report from an RCGP-led health literacy workshop – June 2014

“Health Literacy is needed for patients and the public to understand and act upon health information, to become active and equal partners in co-producing health, and to take control of their health to help shape health environments and health services for themselves, their families and their communities.

In view of the importance of health literacy to patients and the NHS, NHS England sponsored a meeting, hosted by CIRC in collaboration with Dr Gill Rowlands, the Chair of the SAPC Health Literacy specialist group.

The aim of the meeting was to facilitate discussion about the important principles around health literacy relevant to primary care. Central to the discussion was a shared understanding of what is meant by the term ‘health literacy’ and to formulate a number of recommendations.

Low health literacy is a problem for everyone, even in the least deprived areas there is still a significant proportion of the population that cannot understand health materials. Through the Health Literacy Report the College is urging the medical profession to avoid using medical jargon when speaking to patients about their health.

In addition to learning about health literacy and its impact on patients, the public and the NHS, those present brought their perspectives and expertise to the discussions. Several themes emerged and can be found the report.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health Literacy: report from an RCGP-led health literacy workshop – June 2014 )

Institute of Medicine. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2014

Posted on July 22, 2014. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , , |

Institute of Medicine. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2014.

ISBN 978-0-309-29980-0

“Description

Although health literacy is commonly defined as an individual trait, it does not depend on the skills of individuals alone. Health literacy is the product of the interaction between individuals’ capacities and the health literacy-related demands and complexities of the health care system. Specifically, the ability to understand, evaluate, and use numbers is important to making informed health care choices.

Health Literacy and Numeracy is the summary of a workshop convened by The Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Health Literacy in July 2013 to discuss topics related to numeracy, including the effects of ill health on cognitive capacity, issues with communication of health information to the public, and communicating numeric information for decision making. This report includes a paper commissioned by the Roundtable, “Numeracy and the Affordable Care Act: Opportunities and Challenges,” that discusses research findings about people’s numeracy skill levels; the kinds of numeracy skills that are needed to select a health plan, choose treatments, and understand medication instructions; and how providers should communicate with those with low numeracy skills. The paper was featured in the workshop and served as the basis of discussion.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Institute of Medicine. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2014 )

Making it Easy: a health literacy action plan for Scotland – 3 June 2014

Posted on June 11, 2014. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: |

Making it Easy: a health literacy action plan for Scotland – 3 June 2014

Full text

 

ISBN: 978-1-78412-511-0

“• Highlights the hidden problem of low health literacy and the impact that this has on our ability to access, understand, engage and participate in our health and social care.

• Explains that low health literacy leads to poor health outcomes and widens health inequality.

• Calls for all of us involved in health and social care to systematically address health literacy as a priority in our efforts to improve health and reduce health inequalities.

• Sets out an ambition for all of us in Scotland to have the confidence, knowledge, understanding and skills we need to live well, with any health condition we have.

• Lays out the actions the Scottish Government and partners are taking to help all of us in health and social care collaborate and help realise this ambition.”

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Making it Easy: a health literacy action plan for Scotland – 3 June 2014 )

Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary (2014) – National Research Council

Posted on April 4, 2014. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , , |

Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary (2014) – National Research Council

National Research Council. Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2014.

“Description

Although health literacy is commonly defined as an individual trait, it does not depend on the skills of individuals alone. Health literacy is the product of the interaction between individuals’ capacities and the health literacy-related demands and complexities of the health care system. Specifically, the ability to understand, evaluate, and use numbers is important to making informed health care choices.

Health Literacy and Numeracy is the summary of a workshop convened by The Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Health Literacy in July 2013 to discuss topics related to numeracy, including the effects of ill health on cognitive capacity, issues with communication of health information to the public, and communicating numeric information for decision making. This report includes a paper commissioned by the Roundtable, “Numeracy and the Affordable Care Act: Opportunities and Challenges,” that discusses research findings about people’s numeracy skill levels; the kinds of numeracy skills that are needed to select a health plan, choose treatments, and understand medication instructions; and how providers should communicate with those with low numeracy skills. The paper was featured in the workshop and served as the basis of discussion.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health Literacy and Numeracy: Workshop Summary (2014) – National Research Council )

The Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) and User’s Guide – AHRQ – October 2013

Posted on December 4, 2013. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

The Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) and User’s Guide – AHRQ – October 2013

“An Instrument To Assess the Understandability and Actionability of Print and Audiovisual Patient Education Materials

The Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) is a systematic method to evaluate and compare the understandability and actionability of patient education materials. It is designed as a guide to help determine whether patients will be able to understand and act on information. Separate tools are available for use with print and audiovisual materials.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on The Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) and User’s Guide – AHRQ – October 2013 )

Organizational Change to Improve Health Literacy: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2013

Posted on October 18, 2013. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , , |

Organizational Change to Improve Health Literacy: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2013

ISBN 978-0-309-28805-7

“Organizational Change to Improve Health Literacy is the summary of a workshop convened in April 2013 by the Institute of Medicine Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice Roundtable on Health Literacy. As a follow up to the 2012 discussion paper Ten Attributes of a Health Literate Health Care Organization, participants met to examine what is known about implementation of the attributes of a health literate health care organization and to create a network of health literacy implementers who can share information about health literacy innovations and problem solving. This report discusses implementation approaches and shares tools that could be used in implementing specific literacy strategies.

Although health literacy is commonly defined as an individual trait, there is a growing appreciation that health literacy does not depend on the skills of individuals alone. Health literacy is the product of the interaction between individuals’ capacities and the health literacy-related demands and complexities of the health care system. System changes are needed to better align health care demands with the public’s skills and abilities. Organizational Change to Improve Health Literacy focuses on changes that could be made to achieve this goal.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Organizational Change to Improve Health Literacy: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2013 )

Health literacy and health information producers: Report of the findings of a UK wide survey of information producers and providers – The Patient Information Forum (PiF) – 3 October 2013

Posted on October 18, 2013. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , , |

Health literacy and health information producers: Report of the findings of a UK wide survey of information producers and providers – The Patient Information Forum (PiF) – 3 October 2013

Health literacy survey finds support for health information producers is lacking

A Patient Information Forum (PiF) survey has found that although information producers understand why clear, easy to understand and usable health information for the public is important, many are not equipped to meet the challenge. PiF says this lack of support and guidance for producers could derail the government’s ambition for transforming information for the NHS, public health and social care.

Over 340 of the best-known health information producers responded to the survey including voluntary sector organisations, NHS organisations and commercial companies. The survey found that although more than 90 per cent viewed health literacy as very important when producing information for the public, only 10 per cent said they had a health literacy strategy or policy. Fewer than half produced online and printed materials with health literacy in mind.”

… continues on the site

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health literacy and health information producers: Report of the findings of a UK wide survey of information producers and providers – The Patient Information Forum (PiF) – 3 October 2013 )

Ophelia Victoria – Optimising health literacy to improve health and equity

Posted on August 30, 2013. Filed under: Health Status | Tags: |

Ophelia Victoria – Optimising health literacy to improve health and equity

“Ophelia is a three year Victorian initiative which will identify and test new interventions to address health literacy needs in people attending a broad range of Victorian agencies. It is funded by the Australian Research Council, in partnership with the Victorian Department of Health and Monash University.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Ophelia Victoria – Optimising health literacy to improve health and equity )

Health Literacy: Improving Health, Health Systems, and Health Policy Around the World – Workshop Summary – released 12 July 2013

Posted on August 26, 2013. Filed under: Health Policy, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

Health Literacy: Improving Health, Health Systems, and Health Policy Around the World – Workshop Summary – released 12 July 2013

“From the first use of the term health literacy in 1974 – described as “health education meeting minimal standards for all school grade levels” – the definition of health literacy has evolved into a common idea that involves both the need for people to understand information that helps them maintain good health and the need for health systems to reduce their complexity . Since the 1990s, health literacy has taken two different approaches; one oriented to clinical care and the other to public health. The public health approach is more prominent in developing nations, where organizations not only work to improve health for large groups of people but also provide educational opportunities. There are many opportunities for international research collaboration between the United States, European countries, and developing nations.

In September 2012, the IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy hosted a workshop focused on international health literacy efforts. The workshop featured presentations and discussions about health literacy interventions from various countries as well as other topics related to international health literacy. This document summarizes the workshop.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health Literacy: Improving Health, Health Systems, and Health Policy Around the World – Workshop Summary – released 12 July 2013 )

Health literacy: the solid facts – WHO Regional Office for Europe – 2013

Posted on August 13, 2013. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Health literacy: the solid facts – WHO Regional Office for Europe – 2013

ISBN: 978 92 890 00154

“ABSTRACT
This publication makes the case for policy action to strengthen health literacy. Evidence, including the results of the European Health Literacy Survey, is presented that supports a wider and relational whole-of-society approach to health literacy that considers both an individual’s level of health literacy and the complexities of the contexts within which people act. The data from the European Health Literacy Survey show that nearly half the Europeans surveyed have inadequate or problematic health literacy. Weak health literacy skills are associated with riskier behaviour, poorer health, less self-management and more hospitalization and costs. Strengthening health literacy has been shown to build individual and community resilience, help address health inequities and improve health and well-being. Practical and effective ways public health and other sectoral authorities and advocates can take action to strengthen health literacy in a variety of settings are identified. Specific evidence is presented for educational settings, workplaces, marketplaces, health systems, new and traditional media and political arenas.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health literacy: the solid facts – WHO Regional Office for Europe – 2013 )

Health literacy: the solid facts – WHO – 2013

Posted on June 28, 2013. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Health literacy: the solid facts – WHO – 2013

“ABSTRACT

This publication makes the case for policy action to strengthen health literacy. Evidence, including the results of the European Health Literacy Survey, is presented that supports a wider and relational whole-of-society approach to health literacy that considers both an individual’s level of health literacy and the complexities of the contexts within which people act. The data from the European Health Literacy Survey show that nearly half the Europeans surveyed have inadequate or problematic health literacy. Weak health literacy skills are associated with riskier behaviour, poorer health, less self-management and more hospitalization and costs. Strengthening health literacy has been shown to build individual and community resilience, help address health inequities and improve health and well-being. Practical and effective ways public health and other sectoral authorities and advocates can take action to strengthen health literacy in a variety of settings are identified. Specific evidence is presented for educational settings, workplaces, marketplaces, health systems, new and traditional media and political arenas.”

ISBN: 978 92 890 00154

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health literacy: the solid facts – WHO – 2013 )

An inter-sectoral approach for improving health literacy for Canadians – Public Health Association of BC – November 2012

Posted on November 27, 2012. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: |

An inter-sectoral approach for improving health literacy for Canadians – Public Health Association of BC – November 2012

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on An inter-sectoral approach for improving health literacy for Canadians – Public Health Association of BC – November 2012 )

How Can Health Care Organizations Become More Health Literate? – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 18 July 2012

Posted on July 19, 2012. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

How Can Health Care Organizations Become More Health Literate? – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 18 July 2012

Full text

“Approximately 80 million adults in the United States have low health literacy – an individual’s ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information. Low health literacy creates difficulties in communicating with clinicians, poses barriers in managing chronic illness, lessens the likelihood of receiving preventive care, heightens the possibility of experiencing serious medication errors, increased risk of hospitalization, and results in poorer quality of life.

It is important for health care organizations to develop strategies that can improve their health literacy, yet organizations often find it difficult to determine exactly what it means to be health literate. The IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy commissioned a paper that defined a health literate health care organization as “an organization that makes it easier for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health.” In November 2011, the roundtable held a workshop to discuss the growing recognition that health literacy depends not only on individual skills and abilities but also on the demands and complexities of the health care system. This document summarizes the workshop.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on How Can Health Care Organizations Become More Health Literate? – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 18 July 2012 )

Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations – Institute of Medicine – June 2012

Posted on July 3, 2012. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations – Institute of Medicine – June 2012

Cindy Brach, Debra Keller, Lyla M. Hernandez, Cynthia Baur, Ruth Parker, Benard Dreyer, Paul Schyve, Andrew J. Lemerise, and Dean Schillinger,  Participants in the activities of the IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy.

“This paper describes 10 attributes of health literate health care organizations, that is, health care organizations that make it easier for people to navigate, understand, and use information and services to take care of their health. Having health literate health care organizations benefits not only the 77 million Americans who have limited health litera-cy, but also the majority of Americans who have difficulty understanding and using cur-rently available health information and health services (ODPHP, 2008).

Although health literacy is commonly defined as an individual trait—the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions (Ratzan and Parker, 2000)—there is a growing appreciation that health literacy does not depend on the skills of individuals alone (IOM, 2003). Health literacy is the product of individuals’ capacities and the health literacy–related demands and complexities of the health care system (Baker, 2006; Rudd 2003). System changes are needed to align health care demands better with the public’s skills and abilities (Parker, 2009; Rudd, 2007).  Health literacy has been identified as a priority area for national action, first by the Department of Health and Human Services as an objective for Healthy People 2010 (HHS, 2000), and again in the 2003 Institute of Medicine report Health Literacy: A Pre-scription to End Confusion (IOM, 2004). The following decade saw the achievement of many milestones that marked health literacy’s ascendency in both the public and private sectors (Parker and Ratzan, 2010), including a National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (ODPHP, 2010). Health literacy has now reached a possible tipping point, the place where paying attention to it could quickly become the norm for health care organi-zations (Koh et al., 2012).”

… continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations – Institute of Medicine – June 2012 )

Improving Health Literacy Within a State – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 14 November 2011

Posted on November 15, 2011. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Improving Health Literacy Within a State – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 14 November 2011

“Nearly half of all American adults lack health literacy – an individual’s ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information.

In order to improve knowledge among these 90 million people, the IOM’s Roundtable on Health Literacy, along with the UCLA Anderson School of Management, held a workshop on November 30, 2010, to explore ways in which state-based organizations and individuals can work to improve health literacy. At the workshop, speakers discussed the clinical effects of health literacy improvement efforts, the economic outcomes of health literacy implementation, and the impact that various stakeholders can have on health literacy.

The roundtable brings together leaders from the federal government, foundations, health plans, associations, and private companies to discuss challenges related to health literacy and to identify approaches to promote health literacy in both the public and private sectors. This document summarizes the workshop.”

Full text

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Improving Health Literacy Within a State – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 14 November 2011 )

Promoting Health Literacy to Encourage Prevention and Wellness: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – November 2011

Posted on November 4, 2011. Filed under: Preventive Healthcare, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

Promoting Health Literacy to Encourage Prevention and Wellness: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – November 2011
Authors: Lyla Hernandez and Suzanne Landi, Rapporteurs; Roundtable on Health Literacy; Institute of Medicine

ISBN-10: 0-309-21577-3    ISBN-13: 978-0-309-21577-0

“Health literacy has been shown to affect health outcomes. The use of preventive services improves health and prevents costly health care expenditures. Several studies have found that health literacy makes a difference in the extent to which populations use preventive services. On September 15, 2009, the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Health Literacy held a workshop to explore approaches to integrate health literacy into primary and secondary prevention.

Promoting Health Literacy to Encourage Prevention and Wellness serves as a factual account of the discussion that took place at the workshop. The report describes the inclusion of health literacy into public health prevention programs at the national, state and local levels, reviews how insurance companies factor health literacy into their prevention programs, and discusses industry contributions to providing health literate primary and secondary prevention.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Promoting Health Literacy to Encourage Prevention and Wellness: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – November 2011 )

Health Literacy Interventions and Outcomes: An Updated Systematic Review – AHRQ – 28 March 2011

Posted on March 29, 2011. Filed under: Health Status | Tags: , |

Health Literacy Interventions and Outcomes: An Updated Systematic Review – AHRQ – 28 March 2011

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Press release:  Low Health Literacy Linked to Higher Risk of Death and More Emergency Room Visits and Hospitalizations 

“Low health literacy in older Americans is linked to poorer health status and a higher risk of death, according to a new evidence report by HHS’ Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). More than 75 million English-speaking adults in the United States have limited health literacy, making it difficult for them to understand and use basic health information.

The report, an update of a 2004 literature review featuring findings from more than 100 new studies, also found an association between low health literacy in all adults, regardless of age, and more frequent use of hospital emergency rooms and inpatient care, compared with other adults.”  … continues on the press release site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Innovations in Health Literacy – Workshop Summary – IOM – 10 March 2011

Posted on March 11, 2011. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Innovations in Health Literacy – Workshop Summary – IOM – 10 March 2011

“Nearly nine out of 10 adults have difficulty using everyday health information to make good health decisions. Minority and lower socioeconomic groups disproportionately lack health literacy—the degree to which a person can obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions. But are there proven ways to improve health literacy? How can research help illuminate pathways to improved health literacy and better health?

The IOM Roundtable on Health Literacy held a meeting on May 27, 2010, to explore areas for research in health literacy, the relationship between health literacy and health disparities, and ways to apply information technology to improve health literacy. Leaders from three government agencies presented the new National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy (NAP), and participants examined the role research can play in achieving the goals the NAP sets forth. This document summarizes the workshop.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

AHRQ Pharmacy Health Literacy Center – US Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

Posted on January 7, 2010. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

AHRQ Pharmacy Health Literacy Center – AHRQ = US Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality
 
“This site provides pharmacists with recently-released health literacy tools and other resources and assistance from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

CAHPS Item Set for Addressing Health Literacy – Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) – US

Posted on January 7, 2010. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: , |

CAHPS Item Set for Addressing Health Literacy –  Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS)
 
“The CAHPS Consortium, led by RAND, has developed a supplemental set for the CAHPS Clinician & Group Survey that focuses on assessing providers’ activities to foster and improve the health literacy of patients. Health literacy is commonly defined as patients’ ability to obtain, process, and understand the basic health information and services they need to make appropriate health decisions. While health literacy depends in part on individuals’ skills, it also depends on the complexity of health information and how it is communicated.
 
The primary goal of the CAHPS Item Set for Addressing Health Literacy is to measure, from the patients’ perspective, how well health information is communicated to them by health care professionals. This work on promoting health literacy is part of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s continuing efforts to encourage a greater emphasis in the provider community on patient-centered care. “

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...