Evidence That Consumers Are Skeptical About Evidence-Based Health Care – 3 June 2010

Posted on June 4, 2010. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Patient Participation | Tags: |

Health Affairs, doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2009.0296
(Published online June 3, 2010)
 
Evidence That Consumers Are Skeptical About Evidence-Based Health Care
Kristin L. Carman et al 
 Abstract
“We undertook focus groups, interviews, and an online survey with health care consumers as part of a recent project to assist purchasers in communicating more effectively about health care evidence and quality. Most of the consumers were ages 18–64; had health insurance through a current employer; and had taken part in making decisions about health insurance coverage for themselves, their spouse, or someone else. We found many of these consumers’ beliefs, values, and knowledge to be at odds with what policy makers prescribe as evidence-based health care. Few consumers understood terms such as “medical evidence” or “quality guidelines.” Most believed that more care meant higher-quality, better care. The gaps in knowledge and misconceptions point to serious challenges in engaging consumers in evidence-based decision making. ”
 
Communication toolkit mentioned in the paper

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Patient Safety At Ten: Unmistakable Progress, Troubling Gaps – Health Affairs article – 2010

Posted on December 2, 2009. Filed under: Patient Safety | Tags: , , , |

Patient Safety At Ten: Unmistakable Progress, Troubling Gaps / Robert M. Wachter
Health Affairs  v.29,  no. 1 (2010)
doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2009.0785
http://dx.doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2009.0785

ABSTRACT

“December 1, 2009, marks the tenth anniversary of the Institute of Medicine report on medical errors, To Err Is Human, which arguably launched the modern patient-safety movement. Over the past decade, a variety of pressures (such as more robust accreditation standards and increasing error-reporting requirements) have created a stronger business case for hospitals to focus on patient safety. Relatively few health care systems have fully implemented information technology, and we are finally grappling with balancing “no blame” and accountability. The research pipeline is maturing, but funding remains inadequate. Our limited ability to measure progress in safety is a substantial impediment. Overall, I give our safety efforts a grade of B−, a modest improvement since 2004.”

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