An Introduction to the Ethical Implications of Economic Evaluations for Healthy Public Policy – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy [Canada] – October 2013

Posted on October 24, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

An Introduction to the Ethical Implications of Economic Evaluations for Healthy Public Policy – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy [Canada] – October 2013

“This briefing note is the first in a series that introduces a critical analysis of the ethical implications of economic evaluations, especially as they arise in the context of healthy public policy. It begins by introducing the main types of economic evaluation (cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility), their general strengths and weaknesses, and what they aim to measure through different means: efficiency…..

It moves on to examine the ethical implications of the ethical (utilitarianism) and methodological (individualism) assumptions shared by the main types of economic evaluations. It concludes by exploring the ways in which economic evaluations can be read and interpreted so that values relevant for public health, which can conflict with those implicitly put forward by economic evaluations, do not fall out of the view of policy makers.”

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World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects – JAMA – 19 October 2013

Posted on October 24, 2013. Filed under: Research | Tags: , |

World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects – JAMA – 19 October 2013

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Population and Public Health Ethics: Cases from research, policy, and practice – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy [Canada] – March 2013

Posted on April 11, 2013. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

Population and Public Health Ethics: Cases from research, policy, and practice – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy [Canada] – March 2013

“This Casebook features 16 cases on population and public health ethics that are accompanied by an invited case discussion.”

 

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Population and public health ethics: cases from research, policy and practice – University of Toronto – February 2013

Posted on March 26, 2013. Filed under: Aboriginal TI Health, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Population and public health ethics: cases from research, policy and practice – University of Toronto – February 2013

“This book brings together 16 cases of ethical issues encountered across a range of public health issues and sectors and presents accompanying analyses by leading experts in public health ethics.”

Press release from the National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health [Canada] – 28 February 2013

“The NCCAH co-author two cases studies: ‘First Nations Drinking Water Policies’ and ‘Health Inequities in First Nations Communities and Canada’s Response to the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic’.”

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Public involvement in research:impact on ethical aspects of research – INVOLVE – June 2012

Posted on June 25, 2012. Filed under: Patient Participation, Research | Tags: |

Public involvement in research:impact on ethical aspects of research – INVOLVE – June 2012

“This resource provides examples of the impact of public involvement in the ethical design and conduct of research.

Authors:  Kristina Staley, TwoCan Associates; Maryrose Tarpey, INVOLVE Coordinating Centre; Helen Hayes, INVOLVE Coordinating Centre and Sarah Buckland, INVOLVE Coordinating Centre.

Drawing on findings from three reviews (Brett et al. 2010; Staley 2009; Smith et al. 2008) and more recent literature, this supplement illustrates how public involvement throughout a study can help to make research more ethical.”

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Guidance on collaboration between healthcare professionals and the pharmaceutical industry [UK] – 29 March 2012

Posted on March 30, 2012. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Guidance on collaboration between healthcare professionals and the pharmaceutical industry. Ethics, transparency, partnership – jointly produced by senior representatives of the pharmaceutical industry and the healthcare community – 29 March 2012

Media release 

“Healthcare leaders from across the UK have today published a new set of guidelines to promote positive collaboration between health organisations and the pharmaceutical industry and help guide their working practices and interaction. The statement of best practice was signed by 18 healthcare organisations, including the Department of Health, the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government.

The publication comes as collaborative working becomes an increasingly important way for the NHS to address key health challenges in a constrained budgetary environment.

The guidance has been formulated by the Ethical Standards in Health and Life Sciences Group (ESHLSG) which is comprised of leading figures from the professional, representative and regulatory bodies from the health professional community and life sciences industry. The Group was established to address issues in partnership which impact on the relationship between commercial organisations and health professionals and ensures that these relationships meet the high expectations of stakeholders, and particularly patients.

Specifically the statement:

• Acknowledges that active collaboration can deliver better patient care and improved outcomes.

• Clearly describes the current working environment in which pharmaceutical companies and health care professionals operate and the rules and regulations to which all parties must abide.

• Details in a “Dos and Don’ts” section, every day, practical advice for those working in collaboration to improve patient outcomes.”

… continues

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The National Inquiry into Ethical Decision Making in the NHS – Centre for Innovation in Health Management – 2012

Posted on February 9, 2012. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , , |

The National Inquiry into Ethical Decision Making in the NHS – Centre for Innovation in Health Management – 2012

“CIHM’s third National Inquiry, this time into Organisational Decision Making in the NHS has highlighted the need for more resources on ethical decision-making at a senior management level.

The major output from this research is a checklist for ethical decision-making, which we recommend implementing in real situations. It is only through practice that NHS staff can improve their ethical decision-making.

In our report we have set out some simple, practical advice that can help NHS organisations to make better, more effective ethical decisions. We have also have looked in detail at specific ethical issues – fairness, justice, equity, equality, openness, honesty, transparency – which will play a role in decisions made by all trusts at some point.

The report is particularly relevant for NHS senior managers and Board members although all those within the NHS who are making strategic and organisational decisions may find it of value. The check list in the report can be used to influence decision-making at all levels of the organisation. Wherever there is an element of ethical complexity to the decision in question, we think these considerations are important, and the checklist is intendeds to be flexible enough to be used in a number of different contexts.”

… continues on the site

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Commission on Assisted Dying – Demos – 5 January 2012

Posted on January 9, 2012. Filed under: Palliative Care | Tags: , , |

Commission on Assisted Dying – Demos – 5 January 2012

“The current legal status of assisted dying is inadequate and incoherent…”

ISBN   978-1-906693-92-3

“The Commission on Assisted Dying, launched in November 2010, was set up to consider whether the current legal and policy approach to assisted dying in England and Wales is fit for purpose. In addition to evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the legal status quo, the Commission also set out to explore the question of what a framework for assisted dying might look like, if such a system were to be implemented in the UK, and what approach might be most acceptable to health and social care professionals and to the general public.

The Commission, chaired by Lord Falconer, includes members with expertise in law, medicine, social care, mental health, palliative care, theology, disability and policing. The Commission engaged in a wide-ranging inquiry into the subject, including a public call for evidence which received over 1,200 responses, public evidence hearings, international research visits, and original and commissioned research on the issues surrounding assisted dying.

In this report, the Commission concludes that the current legal status of assisted suicide is inadequate and incoherent. While the current legal regime can be distressing for the people affected and their families, it is also unclear for health and social care staff, and lays a deeply challenging burden on police and prosecutors, which could be eased by a new statutory framework. A proposed legal framework for assisted dying is laid out in detail in the report, including strict criteria to define who might be eligible to receive assistance and robust safeguards to prevent abuse of any new law.

Based on the evidence received, the Commission considers that substantial improvements to health and social care services would be needed in parallel with changes to the law to permit assisted dying. It proposes that the role of any future assisted dying legislation must be to provide all people with access to high quality end of life care and protect potentially vulnerable people from any form of social pressure to end their lives, at the same time as providing people with greater choice and control regarding how and when they die.”

… continues on the site

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Guidelines for the ethical management of people with advanced chronic or terminal conditions in the final months of life – NHMRC – 8 September 2011

Posted on September 9, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Guidelines for the ethical management of people with advanced chronic or terminal conditions in the final months of life – NHMRC – 8 September 2011
ISBN: 1864965258

“Many people of all ages are diagnosed with chronic or terminal conditions every year.

If you are an individual in this situation or a health practitioner providing care for someone in this situation, the guidance and framework documents on this page may assist with the difficult ethical deliberations around the care you are receiving or providing.

The framework is intended for health professionals and has been designed to guide deliberations over ethical aspects of providing care at the transition phase of a patient’s journey through an advanced chronic or terminal condition, including cancer.

The guide is intended for patients (of all ages), families and carers and has been designed to facilitate what can be difficult conversations about ethically related issues which arise at this time of transition e.g. preferred type and place of care – hospice, hospital, or home.

Both the framework and the guide identify key ethical principles and values relevant to the last twelve months or so of life for those with an advanced chronic or terminal condition making the transition to palliative care. The documents pose some questions which can be explored at any stage of this transition whether as patients, health professionals, family or carers.

They also provide additional resources via web-links to assist health professionals, patients, carers or family members to access further information and advice for deliberations about the ethical aspects of the palliative care being provided.”

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Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies – Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies – June 2011

Posted on July 12, 2011. Filed under: Aboriginal TI Health, Research | Tags: |

Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies – Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies – June 2011

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A Survey of Ethical Principles and Guidance Within Selected Pandemic Plans – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy [Canada] – June 2011

Posted on June 29, 2011. Filed under: Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , |

A Survey of Ethical Principles and Guidance Within Selected Pandemic Plans – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy [Canada] – June 2011

“This document provides a survey of the explicit goals, ethical principles, and ethics-related recommendations put forward by a selection of national, sub-national and international pandemic preparedness plans and policies.

Moral theories and concepts draw attention to and encourage debate on the variety of ends, goals, and means that can be adopted in preparing for and responding to public health emergencies.

This survey provides a concise comparison of several ethical frameworks in order to help us to think about how we might deliberate to justify difficult decisions in the context of an actual public health emergency.”

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Public Health Ethics. Selected Resources: Ethics in a Pandemic – National [Canadian] Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy – May 2011

Posted on May 31, 2011. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

Public Health Ethics. Selected Resources: Ethics in a Pandemic – National [Canadian] Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy – May 2011

“This document is based on a review of the literature on this subject carried out by the NCCHPP between May and August of 2009.

It contains a selection of relevant, representative, and accessible works that together provide a foundation for exploring the ethical implications of infectious disease control and pandemic response. In it, you will find:

• Short summaries of a selection of seminal papers, frameworks and guidelines;
• Links to additional resources on ethics and pandemics, including articles, presentations, case studies and other learning tools, and pertinent websites, blogs, and news sources.”

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Governance arrangements for research ethics committees: a harmonised edition – UK – 9 May 2011

Posted on May 20, 2011. Filed under: Research | Tags: |

Governance arrangements for research ethics committees: a harmonised edition – UK – 9 May 2011

“This document is the policy of the UK Health Departments describing what is expected from the research ethics committees that review research proposals relating to areas of the UK Health Department’s responsibility. It also explains when review by these committees is required.

The policy covers the principles, requirements and standards for research ethics committees, including their remit, composition, functions, management and accountability. It also describes the Research Ethics Service in which the research ethics committees operate and the review they provide.

This harmonised edition comes into effect on 1 September 2011. It revises and replaces editions of the policy previously issued separately in England and Scotland in 2001. It also applies in Wales and Northern Ireland.”

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Personalised healthcareMedical profiling and online medicine: the ethics of ‘personalised healthcare’ in a consumer age – Nuffield Council on Bioethics – October 2010

Posted on January 11, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Patient Participation | Tags: |

Personalised healthcare: medical profiling and online medicine: the ethics of ‘personalised healthcare’ in a consumer age – Nuffield Council on Bioethics – October 2010

“New developments in medical profiling and online medicine are promised by their providers as leading to a new era of ‘personalised healthcare’.

These developments include direct-to-consumer personal genetic profiling and body imaging, and websites that provide health advice, storage of health records and medicines for sale. This report weighs up the benefits and harms, along with the ethical values that come into play.”

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Ethics and Employee Engagement – Ethics Resource Centre and Hay Group – July 2010

Posted on September 10, 2010. Filed under: Workforce | Tags: |

Ethics and Employee Engagement – Ethics Resource Centre and Hay Group – July 2010

“The recent recession was a jarring reminder that efficiency and effectiveness are essential to the survival of any organization and that employee engagement—the commitment employees feel toward their employing organization—is a critical part of the equation. Engaged employees recommend their company to friends and family, take pride in working there, and intend to stay with the company. They are also willing to go the extra mile for their organization, making it possible for the company to do more with less. And because they can be counted on to make independent decisions and take action in ways that are consistent with the company’s culture, objectives, and values, they require less supervision and direction and adapt easily to changing roles and responsibilities.”

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