Safety culture: What is it and how do we monitor and measure it? – The Health Foundation – March 2013

Posted on March 22, 2013. Filed under: Patient Safety | Tags: , |

Safety culture: What is it and how do we monitor and measure it? – The Health Foundation – March 2013

“On 20 February 2013, the Health Foundation hosted a roundtable event to discuss what is understood as ‘safety culture’, why it is important and how it can be measured and monitored. This roundtable was held as part of the Health Foundation’s work to lead a step-change in thinking about patient safety.

Patient safety experts from academia, public policy, quality improvement and frontline care came together to share their knowledge and learning in order to build understanding in this area, and to recommend some practical next steps.

This event report summarises the discussion and identifies themes that should be explored further.

Key messages include:”

… continues on the site

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Changing Management Cultures and Organisational Performance in the NHS (OC2) – Research Report – April 2010

Posted on May 19, 2010. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: , , |

Changing Management Cultures and Organisational Performance in the NHS (OC2) – Research Report – April 2010

Produced for the National Institute for Health Research Service Delivery and Organisation programme
prepared by: Russell Mannion  et al

“The rhetoric surrounding policy changes in the NHS has, in recent years, extended beyond consideration of structural arrangements and incentive regimes, to encompass suggestions that NHS organisations also need to undergo significant cultural renewal if the desired improvements in quality and performance are to be secured (Department of Health, 2001; Mannion et al. 2005).

Since the election of the New Labour government in 1997, clinical quality, safety and performance have all been the focus of purposeful management intervention alongside broader systemic changes. From 2002 onwards, broader system reform has included a whole raft of pro-market policies, programmes and supporting tactics designed to introduce new incentives for purchasers and providers, including the promotion of a more diversified delivery environment – with an expanded role for independent sector providers and private capital; a new hospital prospective payment system (Payment by Results); and enhanced patient choice. The implementation of such changes is likely to have major cultural consequences, (both intended and unintended) not least because they challenge many deeply held managerial assumptions and professional values that have been affirmed over decades and woven into the fabric of health care delivery (Scott et al. 2003b).

This report details the findings of a three year National Institute of Health Research Service Delivery and Organisation programme funded project into changing cultures, relationships and performance in the NHS undertaken by an interdisciplinary consortium of researchers based at the Universities of Birmingham, York, St Andrews, Manchester, Durham and King’s College, London. It builds upon (and should be read alongside) the associated SDO report – Measuring and Assessing Organisational Cultures in the NHS – also available on the SDO website (Mannion et al. 2008b).”

…continues

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