Better Value: An analysis of the impact of current healthcare system funding and financing models and the value of health and healthcare in Canada – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Posted on June 27, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: , , , , |

Better Value: An analysis of the impact of current healthcare system funding and financing models and the value of health and healthcare in Canada – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Stuart N. Soroka

“Key Messages

Discussions of healthcare reform must acknowledge the following context: on the one hand, public opinion data suggest that Canadians are increasingly concerned about the future viability of public healthcare; on the other hand, Canadians remain highly supportive of universal healthcare in principle, and they remain largely pleased with their own interactions with the system.

There has been a striking increase in public spending on healthcare over the last 10-15 years. Specifically, controlling for inflation, per capita spending on healthcare in Canada was more than 50% higher in 2010 than in 1996.

This investment in healthcare has positive consequences where public assessments are concerned. Increased healthcare expenditures over the past decade appear to have made a difference: Canadians’ assessments of the current system have improved alongside increased expenditures.

Cross-provincial differences in the relationship between various measures of healthcare policy outcomes provide a valuable source of evidence on “value” in healthcare, and results confirm that value is not simply about spending more. For instance, the relationship between spending on physicians and the number of doctors per capita or wait times, or between hospital spending and the nursing workforce, clearly varies across provinces. In some cases increased spending appears to lead to better health policy outcomes; in other cases the relationship is much less clear.

The relationship between increased spending and improved public assessments also appears to vary across spending domains. Specifically, investments in hospitals, in drugs and in public health are more reliably linked to improved public assessments of the system, while spending in other healthcare domains is not clearly associated with improved public assessments.

Capturing “value” in healthcare is possible, then. But at present the required data – including data on key healthcare indicators and public attitudes on healthcare – are only intermittently available. A stronger commitment to monitor system outcomes should accompany a renewed investment in the Canadian healthcare system.”

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Seeking security: promoting women’s economic wellbeing following domestic violence – Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse – March 2011

Posted on March 15, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Violence | Tags: , |

Seeking security: promoting women’s economic wellbeing following domestic violence – Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse – March 2011

Rochelle Braaf & Isobelle Barrett Meyering

“This critical report analyses the experiences of 57 women affected by domestic violence and 50 workers to investigate the impact of domestic violence on women’s economic wellbeing, as well as the intersection of financial insecurity with their recovery overall.  Funded through FaHCSIA, Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse researchers conducted the study during 2009-2010.”

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NHS reference costs 2009-2010 – 13 January 2011

Posted on January 18, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: , , |

NHS reference costs 2009-2010 – 13 January 2011

“This suite of documents provides the most detailed picture available about how £51 billion of NHS expenditure was used by over 400 NHS organisations to treat patients in 2009-10. As in previous years, the main purpose is to provide a basis for comparison within (and outside) the NHS between organisations, and down to the level of individual treatments. The organisation level data that underpins the national averages is being published alongside the National Schedules and Reference Cost Index (RCI) on our website.

This is the first publication of the Reference Costs since the Review of Reference Costs was published in July 2010, which amongst its outcomes suggested that the data publication could be improved to help users of the data and improve the quality of future submissions.”

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