Defining Health and Health Care Sustainability – The Conference Board of Canada, 72 pages, July 2014

Posted on July 22, 2014. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: |

Defining Health and Health Care Sustainability – The Conference Board of Canada, 72 pages, July 2014

“Canadian health care costs are soaring and major reforms are needed to preserve and improve the quality of health care. This report develops a sustainability framework with guiding principles and key factors deemed essential to support sustainable health care.

Document Highlights

Health care costs currently absorb about 11 per cent of Canada’s gross domestic product and almost half of provincial budgets. We will not be able to preserve, let alone improve, the quality of our health care without major reforms. To meet this challenge—the fiscally unsustainable public health care system in Canada—the Conference Board’s Canadian Alliance for Sustainable Health Care (CASHC) program researched and analyzed the issues and options for solution.

This report defines sustainability and presents a sustainability framework to guide CASHC’s policy work and future recommendations on health care. The definition and framework follow an extensive literature review and comprehensive interviews with representatives of health care stakeholders.

The sustainability framework has four guiding principles and six key factors deemed essential to support sustainable health and health care. While these may not be new to the reader, the innovation in the report comes from their systematic implementation across the continuum of care, across diseases, and across departments controlling determinants of health in order to create a well-functioning system.”

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Future Care for Canadian Seniors: Why it Matters – The Conference Board of Canada – October 2013

Posted on October 11, 2013. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: |

Future Care for Canadian Seniors: Why it Matters – The Conference Board of Canada – October 2013

“To provide for the future care needs of today’s and tomorrow’s seniors, Canada must invest its increasingly scarce health dollars in the right type and mix of services. This Conference Board of Canada primer provides an overview of the landscape of care and services outside of hospitals that support aging Canadians, along with a discussion of why it is important to look toward the future of care for Canadian seniors. Future Care for Canadian Seniors provides information on the numbers and life expectancy of the over-55 population between 2013 and 2030, as well as their health conditions and medical requirements, living arrangements, and out-of-institution support systems, including hospice or home-based palliative care. This briefing is part of the Conference Board’s Future Care for Canadian Seniors research series.”

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Improving Primary Health Care Through Collaboration: Briefing 3 -Measuring the Missed Opportunity – Conference Board of Canada – June 2013

Posted on June 7, 2013. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Primary Hlth Care | Tags: |

Improving Primary Health Care Through Collaboration: Briefing 3 -Measuring the Missed Opportunity – Conference Board of Canada – June 2013

17 pages, Briefing by Thy Dinh, Fares Bounajm

“This briefing is the third in a series of four that aims to provide an analysis of the impact of interprofessional teams on the Canadian primary health care system.

Document Highlights

The existing and future health care needs of the Canadian population are largely about managing chronic conditions. Better management of patients with chronic conditions in the primary care system can reduce the burden in the more costly acute or hospital care system. If the enhanced use of interprofessional primary care (IPC) teams can be shown to be cost-effective, they should become the preferred model of care for chronic conditions in all provinces and territories.

This briefing aims to assess whether IPC teams could become a central component of a health care services delivery strategy for chronic conditions. It provides the results of an empirical analysis of the impact of enhanced IPC teams on the health and economic burden of Type 2 diabetes and depression in Canada.

Other briefings in the Improving Primary Health Care Through Collaboration series:

Briefing 1—Current Knowledge About Interprofessional Teams in Canada
Briefing 2—Barriers to Successful Interprofessional Teams”

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Health Care in Canada: An Economic Growth Engine (Briefing 1)—The Economic Footprint of Health Care Delivery in Canada – The Conference Board of Canada – January 2013

Posted on February 5, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: |

Health Care in Canada: An Economic Growth Engine (Briefing 1)—The Economic Footprint of Health Care Delivery in Canada – The Conference Board of Canada – January 2013

“This briefing looks at health care as an important driver of economic growth—a perspective that is often overlooked. An economic impact analysis is conducted, measuring health care spending’s contribution to economic growth, employment, and government revenues in Canada.”

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Primary Care Teams are not as Effective as they Could be Because of Three Sets of Barriers – Conference Board of Canada – 31 October 2012

Posted on November 2, 2012. Filed under: Primary Hlth Care | Tags: , , |

Primary Care Teams are not as Effective as they Could be Because of Three Sets of Barriers – Conference Board of Canada – 31 October 2012

Improving Primary Health Care Through Collaboration: Briefing 1—Current Knowledge About Interprofessional Teams in Canada – The Conference Board of Canada

Improving Primary Health Care Through Collaboration: Briefing 2—Barriers to Successful Interprofessional Teams

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Measuring Success: A Framework for Benchmarking Health Care System Performance – The Conference Board of Canada – September 2012

Posted on October 2, 2012. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , |

Measuring Success: A Framework for Benchmarking Health Care System Performance – The Conference Board of Canada – September 2012

“This current report, Measuring Success: A Framework for Benchmarking Health Care System Performance, provides a foundation for the upcoming provincial and international benchmarking reports. In this report, we discuss the benefits of benchmarking; the benchmarking process and methods; benchmarking frameworks used by other organizations, both within Canada and internationally; and the benchmarking framework that we propose to guide the provincial benchmarking study to be conducted in the fall of 2012. This framework includes a full description of the performance indicators, the rationale for their inclusion, and the ranking methodology.”

… continues

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The Canadian Health Care Debate: A Survey and Assessment of Key Studies – The Conference Board of Canada – May 2012

Posted on June 5, 2012. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , |

The Canadian Health Care Debate: A Survey and Assessment of Key Studies – The Conference Board of Canada – May 2012

Report by Gabriela Prada, Tamara Brown

“A review of the 18 major Canadian studies on how to reform health care identifies 432 recommendations that fall into seven broad themes—with more than half dealing with system management processes, and funding and financing.
Document Highlights

This report reviews 18 of these major studies, looking at the more than 400 recommendations that fall into seven broad themes:

system management approaches and processes;
funding and financial models; quality and value for money;
health human resources;
health promotion and disease prevention;
innovation and innovative technologies;
and access to care.

It examines the proposals for reform, how they were received, their impact, and the areas of consensus and critical gaps and opportunities that need to be explored in future research by the Conference Board’s newly formed Canadian Alliance for Sustainable Health Care.”

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Improving Health Outcomes: The Role of Food in Addressing Chronic Diseases – The Conference Board of Canada – May 2012

Posted on May 28, 2012. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Dietetics, Preventive Healthcare, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Improving Health Outcomes: The Role of Food in Addressing Chronic Diseases – The Conference Board of Canada – May 2012

“Improving Health Outcomes gives an overview of the issues, challenges, and potential solutions for improving dietary risk management. It examines the relationship between food, health, and chronic diseases.

Document Highlights

This report examines the relationship between food, health, and chronic diseases—a key consideration for the Canadian Food Strategy being developed by The Conference Board of Canada’s Centre for Food in Canada (CFIC). The report considers the food-related risk factors for three highly prevalent chronic diseases—cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes. It examines current and historical dietary patterns to assess Canadians’ food-related risks; assesses how well consumers, industry, and governments are managing the key dietary risks; and considers the effectiveness of interventions to encourage healthy eating. The report concludes by proposing seven potential measures that consumers, government, and industry can take to improve dietary risk management to cut the burden of chronic diseases.”

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Home and Community Care in Canada: An Economic Footprint – Conference Board of Canada – May 2012

Posted on May 28, 2012. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Community Services, Health Economics | Tags: , |

Home and Community Care in Canada: An Economic Footprint – Conference Board of Canada – May 2012

Report by Gregory Hermus, Carole Stonebridge, Louis Theriault, Fares Bounajm

“This report estimates the economic footprint of home and community care in Canada, highlighting the implications of caregiving employees for businesses, and shedding light on the potential spending implications of shifting some care from institutions to homes.

Document Highlights

Demand for home and community care is expected to grow dramatically as the population ages. Planning for the future of the sector requires that its current economic footprint be understood.

Total estimated spending on home and community care in 2010 ranged from $8.9 billion to $10.5 billion, accounting for between 4.6 and 5.5 per cent of total health spending in Canada. Between 22 and 27 per cent was paid by private sources.

There are opportunities to address key health system challenges by substituting home and community care services for acute or long-term services.

The home and community care sector relies heavily on volunteer efforts and unpaid care, something that raises concerns about the sustainability of the sector going forward. The estimated cost to Canadian businesses was over $1.28 billion in 2007 in lost productivity as a result of caregivers missing full days of work, missing hours of work, or even quitting or losing their jobs.”

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Cost Risk Analysis for Chronic Lung Disease in Canada – The Conference Board of Canada – March 2012

Posted on March 16, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics, Respiratory Medicine | Tags: |

Cost Risk Analysis for Chronic Lung Disease in Canada – The Conference Board of Canada – March 2012

Report by Louis Theriault, Gregory Hermus, Danielle Goldfarb, Carole Stonebridge, Fares Bounajm

“This report provides forecasts of chronic lung disease rates and associated economic burden to the year 2030, to help policy-makers determine effective chronic lung health policies and set priorities among competing options.

Respiratory diseases are a significant cause of mortality and represent some of the most costly diseases in Canada. The growth in the number of older Canadians will contribute to the rising economic burden associated with chronic lung disease. One way to address this burden is to reduce the risk factors that encourage their development.

This report examines the cost savings from reducing six of the risk factors that contribute to the three major chronic lung diseases—lung cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Based on a status quo scenario and a forecast scenario, the report estimates that over the entire forecast horizon (2012–2030), the policy scenario could reduce the economic burden by a combined $12.2 billion.

The cost savings from the policy scenario would increase dramatically over time, compared with the status quo scenario, where only minimal improvement would take place. The analysis in the report suggests that investments to offset future costs associated with chronic lung disease need to be made well in advance to ensure the reduction in the economic burden actually materializes.”

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A Call for Collaborative Leadership: Implementing Information and Communications Technologies in Canadian Health Systems – conference Board of Canada – September 2010

Posted on October 15, 2010. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: , |

A Call for Collaborative Leadership: Implementing Information and Communications Technologies in Canadian Health Systems – Conference Board of Canada – September 2010

Canada lags international peers in its uptake of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in the health system. A collaborative leadership is needed to overcome existing barriers to ICT implementation and improve health system performance.

Executive Action by
The Conference Board of Canada, 8 pages, September 2010

Document Highlights:
The implementation of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in the Canadian health system offers the potential to improve health outcomes, enhance system performance, and generate cost savings. Yet Canada lags its international peers in implementing ICTs. Canadian hospitals, for example, allocate only 1.5 per cent of their budgets to ICTs compared with the 4.4 per cent average across the Organisation for Co-operation and Development. In A Call for Collaborative Leadership, the Conference Board outlines the main challenges facing ICT implementation in Canada and reveals how a collaborative leadership approach can help overcome these hurdles and improve health system performance. Critically, the briefing identifies four specific actions that health organizations can take to facilitate the emergence of a collaborative leadership approach to implementing ICTs.

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The Canadian Heart Health Strategy: Risk Factors and Future Cost Implications – February 2010

Posted on February 15, 2010. Filed under: Cardiol / Cardiothor Surg | Tags: |

The Canadian Heart Health Strategy: Risk Factors and Future Cost Implications

“The CBoC [conference Board of Canada] was contracted to investigate the potential impact on national health expenditures if risk factors related to cardiovascular diseases were reduced. This report presents the approach, methodology, and final results of the work.

Report by Sabrina Browarski , Carole Stonebridge , Louis Theriault
The Conference Board of Canada, 36 pages, February 2010

Document Highlights:

The Canadian Heart Health Strategy and Action Plan (CHHS-AP), Building a Heart Healthy Canada, seeks to reduce the growing disease and cost burdens of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in Canada. The CHHS-AP contracted the Conference Board to investigate the potential impact on future national health expenditures if a reduction in risk factors was achieved. This report presents the approach, methodology, and final results of the work.

The forecast looked at five risk factors: lack of physical activity, smoking, obesity, hypertension, and consumption of fruit and vegetables. The analysis was anchored in a detailed population forecast for Canada and compared two forecast scenarios.

The analysis found that achieving the CHHS-AP risk factor targets will lead to a substantial reduction in CVD-related illnesses and cost savings for the health system, governments, and Canadian economy—it suggests a cumulative cost savings of about $5 billion per year, with significantly larger savings if the forecast is extended beyond 2020.”

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