Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence – AHRQ – November 2013

Posted on December 3, 2013. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice | Tags: , |

Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence – AHRQ – November 2013

McCormack L, Sheridan S, Lewis M, Boudewyns V, Melvin CL, KistlerC, Lux LJ, Cullen K, Lohr KN. Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the Use of Health-Related Evidence. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 213. (Prepared by the RTIInternational–University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10056-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 13(14)-E003-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; November 2013.

“Structured Abstract

Objectives. This review examined how to best communicate and disseminate evidence, including uncertain evidence, to inform health care decisions. The review focused on three primary objectives—comparing the effectiveness of: (1) communicating evidence in various contents and formats that increase the likelihood that target audiences will both understand and use the information (KQ 1); (2) a variety of approaches for disseminating evidence from those who develop it to those who are expected to use it (KQ 2); and (3) various ways of communicating uncertainty-associated health-related evidence to different target audiences (KQ 3). A secondary objective was to examine how the effectiveness of communication and dissemination strategies varies across target audiences, including evidence translators, health educators, patients, and clinicians.

Data sources. We searched MEDLINE®, the Cochrane Library, Cochrane Central Trials Registry, PsycINFO®, and the Web of Science. We used a variety of medical subject headings (MeSH terms) and major headings, and used free-text and title and abstract text-word searches. The search waslimited to studies on humans published from 2000 to March 15, 2013, for communication and dissemination, given the prior systematic reviews, and from 1966 to March 15, 2013, for communicating uncertainty.

Review methods. We used standard Evidence-based Practice Center methods of dual review of abstracts, full-text articles, and abstractions, and quality ratings and group consensus to resolve disagreements. We used group consensus to grade strength of evidence.

Results. The search identified 4,152 articles (after removing duplicates) for all three KQs. After dual review at the title/abstract stage and full-text review stage, we retained 61 articles that directly (i.e., head to head) compared strategies to communicate and disseminate evidence.Across the KQs, many of the comparisons yielded insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions. For KQ 1, we found that investigators frequently blend more than one communication strategy in interventions. For KQ 2, we found that, compared with single dissemination strategies, multicomponent dissemination strategies are more effective at enhancing clinician behavior, particularly for guideline adherence. Key findings for KQ 3 indicate that evidence on communicating overall strength of recommendation and precision was insufficient, but certain ways of communicating directness and net benefit may be helpful in reducing uncertainty.

Conclusions. The lack of comparative research evidence to inform communication and dissemination of evidence, including uncertain evidence, impedes timely clinician, patient, and policymaker awareness, uptake, and use of evidence to improve the quality of care. Expanding investment in communication, dissemination, and implementation research is critical to the identification of strategies to accelerate the translation of comparative effectiveness research into community and clinical practice and the direct benefit of patient care.”

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Tell Me – Transparent communication in Epidemics: Learning Lessons from experience, delivering effective Messages, providing Evidence – website

Posted on April 3, 2013. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , , , |

Tell Me – Transparent communication in Epidemics: Learning Lessons from experience, delivering effective Messages, providing Evidence – website

“TELL ME will establish an integrated research project involving experts in social and behavioural sciences, communication and media, health professionals at various levels and specialties and representatives of civil society organisations to develop an evidence-based behavioural and communication package to respond to major epidemic outbreaks, notably flu pandemics. The main outcomes of TELL ME will be an Integrated Communication Kit for Outbreak Communication and simulation software to assess alternative communication strategies.”

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Language support: challenges and benefits for users and providers of health and social care services – Race Equality Foundation – 2013

Posted on February 22, 2013. Filed under: Social Work | Tags: , |

Language support: challenges and benefits for users and providers of health and social care services – Race Equality Foundation – 2013

“Evidence on the significance of communication in the effective provision of health care suggests that language can be a significant barrier to accessing health and social care services.   This briefing paper identifies and discusses different approaches to language support in health and social care, by comparing the use of professional and volunteer interpreters.  The author identifies key implications for policy and practice from both a patient and a provider perspective, and offers an understanding of how interpreting can reduce health inequalities.”

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A literature review on effective risk communication for the prevention and control of communicable diseases in Europe Insights into health communication: technical report – European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control – January 2013

Posted on February 21, 2013. Filed under: Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , |

A literature review on effective risk communication for the prevention and control of communicable diseases in Europe Insights into health communication: technical report – European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control – January 2013

Infanti J, Sixsmith J, Barry MM, Núñez-Córdoba J, Oroviogoicoechea-Ortega C, Guillén-Grima F. A literature review on effective risk communication for the prevention and control of communicable diseases in Europe. Stockholm: ECDC; 2013.

ISBN 978-92-9193-395-2
doi 10.2900/64747

“This review examines the current body of literature on risk communication related to communicable diseases, focusing on: (i) definitions and theories of risk communication; (ii) methodologies, tools and guidelines for risk communication research, policy and implementation; and (iii) implications, insights and key lessons learned from the application of risk communication principles in real-world settings.”

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Can changing clinician–patient interactions improve healthcare quality? – The Health Foundation – December 2011

Posted on December 9, 2011. Filed under: Medicine, Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Can changing clinician–patient interactions improve healthcare quality? – The Health Foundation – December 2011

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Communicating Risks and Benefits: An Evidence-Based User’s Guide – FDA – August 2011

Posted on September 7, 2011. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice | Tags: , |

Communicating Risks and Benefits: An Evidence-Based User’s Guide – FDA – August 2011

Baruch Fischhoff, PhD, Noel T. Brewer, PhD, & Julie S. Downs, PhD, editors

US Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, Risk Communication Advisory Committee and consultants
 
Extract from the introduction:

“Organizations bear economic, legal, and ethical obligations to provide useful information about the risks and benefits of their products, policies, and services. Failure to fulfill those obligations can be costly, as seen with Three Mile Island, Hurricane Katrina, Vioxx, and other cases when people believe that they have been denied vital information. Less dramatic versions of these problems arise with poorly handled produce recalls, badly labeled appliances, and confusing medication instructions. Financial analysts estimate that 70% of a typical private firm’s assets are intangibles, like goodwill, that can be lost when communications fail. Public institutions’ reputations often depend on their ability to communicate.

Risk communication is the term of art used for situations when people need good information to make sound choices. It is distinguished from public affairs (or public relations) communication by its commitment to accuracy and its avoidance of spin. Having been spun adds insult to injury for people who have been hurt because they were inadequately informed. Risk communications must deal with the benefits that risk decisions can produce (e.g., profits from investments, better health from medical procedures), as well as the risks — making the term something of a misnomer, although less clumsy than a more inclusive one.

The risk communication research literature is large and diverse, including results from many contributing disciplines (e.g., psychology, decision science, sociology, communications) and a wide range of applications. Unfortunately, the norms of academic research make it inaccessible to outsiders, filling it with jargon and technical details. Moreover, academic researchers’ theoretical interests often lead to studying communication processes in isolation, leaving gaps as to how research results apply to complex, real-world situations. Unable to access the research literature, practitioners rely on their intuition, unproven best practices, and popular accounts of psychological research.

This guide seeks to fill that gap, making evidence-based communication possible. The chapters that follow cover key topics in risk communication, focusing on three questions:

(1) What does the science say about that aspect of human behavior?
(2) What are the practical implications of those scientific results?
(3) How can one evaluate communications based on that science?

These questions assume that sound communications must be evidence-based in two related ways. One is that communications should be consistent with the science — and not do things known not to work nor ignore known problems. The second is communications should be evaluated — because even the best science cannot guarantee results. Rather, the best science produces the best-informed best guesses about how well communications will work. However, even these best guesses can miss the mark, meaning that they must be evaluated to determine how good they are and how they can be improved.”   … continues

 

 

 

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Communicating in hospital emergency departments – University of Technology Sydney – August 2011

Posted on August 10, 2011. Filed under: Emergency Medicine | Tags: |

Communicating in hospital emergency departments – University of Technology Sydney – August 2011

Communication for Health in Emergency Contexts 

“Summary:
Ineffective communication has been identified as the major cause of critical incidents in public hospitals (NSW Health, 2005a). Critical incidents are adverse events leading to avoidable patient harm. This project, by examining spoken interactions between health-care practitioners and patients in hospital emergency departments identified and analysed causes of misunderstandings and breakdowns.”

ABC report on the project – 10 August 2011 

UTS Newsroom report

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Multi-perspective Strategic Decision Making: Principles, Methods, and Tools – RAND Corporation – 2010

Posted on August 20, 2010. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , , |

Multi-perspective Strategic Decision Making: Principles, Methods, and Tools – RAND Corporation – 2010
 
By: Lynne Wainfan
Pages: 168
Document Number: RGSD-260

“Increasingly, governing groups must take into account diverse perspectives (values, beliefs, and expectations) from within the group, from stakeholders, analysts, and adversaries. Multi-perspective strategic decision making is the process of making long-term decisions that shape the course of an organization, while taking into account diverse perspectives. Often, these perspectives affect the group’s decision more than “objective” criteria. For complex, deeply uncertain problems, groups considering diverse perspectives can be challenged to agree on strategy. This research defines methods, principles, and tools to help groups agree on strategy despite widely diverse perspectives. It extends exploratory analysis techniques to cover new types of factors driving the choice of strategy: “perspective parameters,” including those used for aggregation and scoring variables in a multiresolution model; along with uncertain objective parameters. Six useful simplification techniques are defined to help decision makers see the essence of a complex system and the forces driving it. Finally, this research introduces a heuristic that uses driving forces’ time frame and controllability to identify the best strategy and ways to iterate options. The approach is illustrated using a defense acquisition strategy.”

Full Document (File size 2.2 MB, 9 minutes modem, < 1 minute broadband)

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