Drug Use Among Seniors on Public Drug Programs in Canada, 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 1 May 2014

Posted on May 5, 2014. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Drug Use Among Seniors on Public Drug Programs in Canada, 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 1 May 2014

“Most seniors in Canada are taking at least 5 drugs—and that number increases dramatically for older seniors and those living in long-term care facilities, according to a new report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

Drug Use Among Seniors on Public Drug Programs in Canada, 2012 found that nearly two-thirds of seniors (those age 65 and older) are taking 5 or more prescription drugs. Drug use increases with age, with more than 40% of Canadians age 85 and older taking more than 10 drugs. Additionally, seniors living in long-term care facilities take more medications than those who are living in the community; nearly two-thirds are taking at least 10 drugs.”

Report

“Although seniors those age 65 and older account for only 15% of the Canadian population, they are estimated to account for 40% of all spending on prescribed drugs and 60% of public drug program spending. Seniors take more drugs than younger Canadians because, on average, they have a higher number of chronic conditions. Although taking multiple medications may be necessary to manage these conditions it is important to consider the benefits and risks of each medication and the therapeutic goals of the patient. Drug use is also important to monitor from a spending perspective, as increased drug utilization has been found to be the biggest driver of drug spending in Canada.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Drug Use Among Seniors on Public Drug Programs in Canada, 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 1 May 2014 )

Measuring the Level and Determinants of Health System Efficiency in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 10 April 2014

Posted on April 14, 2014. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: , , |

Measuring the Level and Determinants of Health System Efficiency in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 10 April 2014

Public summary: Health system efficiency in Canada: A closer look

Press release: More efficient health system would save lives, money

“…the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) released a new study on the efficiency of the Canadian health system. Measuring the Level and Determinants of Health System Efficiency in Canada examines why health system efficiency varies across Canada, what could be done about it, and what a perfectly efficient health system might look like.

The study estimates the average level of inefficiency to be between 18% and 35%. This means that up to 24,500 premature deaths could be prevented every year—without additional spending.”

… continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Measuring the Level and Determinants of Health System Efficiency in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 10 April 2014 )

Regulated Nurses, 2012 – report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information – 8 October 2013

Posted on October 11, 2013. Filed under: Nursing, Workforce | Tags: , |

Regulated Nurses, 2012 – report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information – 8 October 2013

“Regulated Nurses, 2012 highlights current trends in nursing practice across a variety of demographic, education, mobility and employment characteristics. This series highlights data from the three groups of regulated nursing professionals in Canada: registered nurses (RNs, including nurse practitioners or NPs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs).”

Problematic trends for registered nurse workforce, report reveals – Canadian Nurses Association – 8 October 2013

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Regulated Nurses, 2012 – report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information – 8 October 2013 )

Leaving Against Medical Advice: Characteristics Associated With Self-Discharge – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 1 October 2013

Posted on October 2, 2013. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Emergency Medicine, Medicine | Tags: , |

Leaving Against Medical Advice: Characteristics Associated With Self-Discharge – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 1 October 2013

“People who leave the hospital or an emergency department against medical advice tend to do so before their treatment is complete and often end up returning within a short time frame.

A new study from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) shows that, compared with people who completed their treatment, those who left inpatient care against medical advice were more than twice as likely to be readmitted to hospital within a month and three times as likely to visit an emergency department within a week.

Leaving Against Medical Advice: Characteristics Associated With Self-Discharge also found that more than three out of five people who left inpatient care and returned to an emergency department within a week were admitted to inpatient care upon their return.”

… continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Leaving Against Medical Advice: Characteristics Associated With Self-Discharge – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 1 October 2013 )

Compromised Wounds in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 29 August 2013

Posted on August 30, 2013. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Diabetes | Tags: , , |

Compromised Wounds in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 29 August 2013

“People with diabetes admitted to hospitals are nearly six times more likely than other patients to have wounds that don’t heal properly, reports the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

In fact, diabetes doubles the risk of infections after operations and makes patients nearly 40 times more likely than other patients to develop wounds due to poor blood circulation.

This chronic illness was linked to more than 2,000 foot amputations in 2011–2012, many of which could have been avoided if proper wound care management and prevention had been in place.

CIHI’s unique study looked at persistent or “compromised” wounds—not only those infected or otherwise not healing, but also bed sores—among Canadians in hospitals, receiving home care and in long-term care during that same period.

“Compromised wounds are a burden to our health system,” said Kathleen Morris, CIHI’s Director of Health System Analysis and Emerging Issues. “They can be extremely painful and cause mobility problems and distress for patients.”

While any Canadian can be subject to a poorly healing wound, Compromised Wounds in Canada highlights the increased risks associated with chronic illnesses such as diabetes. It also reveals clear opportunities to reduce the frequency of occurrence.”

… continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Compromised Wounds in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 29 August 2013 )

Nine out of 10 emergency visits take 7.5 hours or less [Canada] – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 20 June 2013

Posted on June 21, 2013. Filed under: Emergency Medicine | Tags: , |

Nine out of 10 emergency visits take 7.5 hours or less [Canada] – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 20 June 2013

“Nine out of 10 hospital emergency department (ED) visits were 7.5 hours or less in 2011–2012. The median (average) time spent—from time of registration to time the patient left the ED—was 2.4 hours, according to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). This information is based on available data covering more than half of the ED visits in Canada, including all of those in Ontario, Alberta and Yukon.

Complex patients can expect to spend more than twice as long in the ED as minor/uncomplicated patients. Nine out of 10 of the complex patients spent 10.5 hours or less in the ED in 2011–2012. In comparison, 9 out of 10 of the minor/uncomplicated patients spent 4.2 hours or less in the ED.”

… continues

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Nine out of 10 emergency visits take 7.5 hours or less [Canada] – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 20 June 2013 )

Health Indicators 2013 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 23 May 2013

Posted on May 29, 2013. Filed under: Health Status | Tags: , , , |

Health Indicators 2013 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 23 May 2013

“As the last in a series of 14 annual reports, Health Indicators 2013 provides an overview of the joint CIHI-Statistics Canada Health Indicators reporting project and describes CIHI’s new program of work in health system performance reporting. This publication also contains the most recently available health indicators data and features an In Focus section that highlights the expanded reporting of health indicators by socio-economic status.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health Indicators 2013 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 23 May 2013 )

Lifetime Distributional Effects of Publicly Financed Health Care in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 14 May 2013

Posted on May 15, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: , , |

Lifetime Distributional Effects of Publicly Financed Health Care in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 14 May 2013

“Public funding of health care has a redistributive effect on the incomes of Canadians, but this is reduced when a life course perspective is considered, according to a new report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

Lifetime Distributional Effects of Publicly Financed Health Care in Canada looks at estimated lifetime per capita health care costs in the public sector—including doctors, hospitals and some drugs—as well as the portion of household taxes that would be required to pay for these services.

The analysis found that average lifetime health care costs are $237,500 for Canadians in the lowest-income group and $206,000 for Canadians with the highest incomes. However, the difference is much larger when looking at only a single year (2011).

Similarly, while tax payments to finance health care are higher for more-affluent Canadians, differences between income groups are muted when examining costs over a lifetime, rather than in one specific year. The most-affluent Canadians contribute the equivalent of 8% of their average annual income toward publicly funded health care, and the least-affluent contribute 6% of theirs.

The report provides insight into what affluence and poverty would look like in Canada without the existence of publicly financed health care. For example, health care costs for members of the highest-income group are equivalent to 3% of their average income; however, costs for those in the lowest-income group are equivalent to 24% of their average income.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Lifetime Distributional Effects of Publicly Financed Health Care in Canada – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 14 May 2013 )

Adverse Drug Reaction-Related Hospitalizations Among Seniors, 2006 to 2011- Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 26 March 2013

Posted on March 27, 2013. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Adverse Drug Reaction-Related Hospitalizations Among Seniors, 2006 to 2011- Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 26 March 2013

This analysis examines hospital discharge data for seniors in all Canadian provinces and territories from 2006-2007 to 2010-2011 to provide an overview of the prevalence of hospitalizations related to adverse drug reactions ADRs. The relationship between various potential risk factors and the likelihood of being hospitalized for an ADR were examined for Alberta, Manitoba and P.E.I.

Media release: Seniors five times more likely to be hospitalized for adverse drug reactions

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Adverse Drug Reaction-Related Hospitalizations Among Seniors, 2006 to 2011- Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 26 March 2013 )

Regulated nurses: Canadian trends, 2007 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 10 January 2013

Posted on January 11, 2013. Filed under: Nursing, Workforce | Tags: , |

Regulated nurses: Canadian trends, 2007 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 10 January 2013

full report 

“More than 360,000 regulated nurses were employed in Canada in 2011, representing an increase of more than 8% since 2007. This growth rate was nearly twice the rate of population growth, according to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) annual report on the nursing workforce. However, the number of registered nurses per 100,000 remains below the peak reached in the early 1990s.

There is a positive trend in the renewal of the nursing profession. Over the last five years, the proportion of regulated nurses younger than age 35 increased from 20.9% to 23.7% of the workforce.

More than 56% of employed nurses were working full time in 2011. Similarly, more than 50% of all younger nurses are finding full-time employment within the first five years of working.

The number of nurse practitioners (NPs) doubled from 1,344 to 2,777 between 2007 and 2011, due in part to increased provincial/territorial investment in NPs and in part to additional jurisdictions submitting NP data to CIHI. NPs are advanced practice registered nurses who have additional education in health assessment and diagnosis and management of illness and injury, and who can order tests and prescribe drugs. More than half of NPs work outside hospitals, in areas such as community practice.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Regulated nurses: Canadian trends, 2007 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 10 January 2013 )

Seniors and Alternate Level of Care: Building on our Knowledge Core – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 29 November 2012

Posted on November 30, 2012. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: , , |

Seniors and Alternate Level of Care: Building on our Knowledge Core – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 29 November 2012

“Executive Summary

This study provides an in-depth look at transitions from acute care to the community. It showcases three Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) data holdings that inform health system planning about the care needs of elderly Canadians who wait in hospitals for placement in the community. These individuals no longer require acute care services but wait in acute care beds for placement in a more appropriate setting such as home or residential care. This population, referred to as “alternate level of care (ALC),” is expected to grow substantially as the Canadian population ages. Evidence suggests that seniors in acute care awaiting discharge may experience decline in their overall health and well-being.”

… continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Seniors and Alternate Level of Care: Building on our Knowledge Core – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 29 November 2012 )

All-Cause Readmission to Acute Care and Return to the Emergency Department – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 14 June 2012

Posted on June 18, 2012. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Emergency Medicine | Tags: , , , |

All-Cause Readmission to Acute Care and Return to the Emergency Department – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 14 June 2012

“One in 12 patients readmitted to Canadian hospitals within 30 days
Study examines who is returning and why

June 14, 2012—Soon after their discharge from hospital, more than 180,000 Canadians were readmitted to acute care in 2010, reveals a study from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). In those jurisdictions where detailed emergency department (ED) data was available—Alberta, Ontario and Yukon—nearly 1 in 10 acute care patients returned to the ED within seven days of hospital discharge. The study, All-Cause Readmission to Acute Care and Return to the Emergency Department, included more than 2.1 million hospitalizations across the country. It looked at surgical, medical, pediatric and obstetric patients to better understand who returned to acute care after discharge and for what clinical reason.

“Better understanding of the factors influencing readmission rates is an important step for improving the quality of care for Canadians,” says Jeremy Veillard, Vice President of Research and Analysis at CIHI. “Although readmissions cannot always be avoided, research suggests that in many cases they may be prevented.”

Reasons for readmission varied by patient group”

… continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on All-Cause Readmission to Acute Care and Return to the Emergency Department – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 14 June 2012 )

Health Indicators 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 24 May 2012

Posted on May 28, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Preventive Healthcare, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

Health Indicators 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 24 May 2012

“The rate of deaths that could potentially be avoided through timely and effective health care and disease prevention dropped from 373 per 100,000 Canadians in 1979 to 185 per 100,000 Canadians in 2008. Health Indicators 2012, the most recent edition of the report produced annually by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) and Statistics Canada, includes updates on more than 40 measures for Canadian regions, including a suite of new avoidable mortality indicators.

“When we look into pan-Canadian results for avoidable deaths,” says Jeremy Veillard, Vice President, Research and Analysis, CIHI, “we can determine the respective impact of prevention efforts and of health care improvements.”

The report reveals that the rate of deaths that could be avoided by preventing disease from developing or an injury from occurring has decreased by 47% over a 30-year period. The rate for Canadians went from 225 per 100,000 in 1979 to 119 per 100,000 in 2008.

Meanwhile, deaths that could have been avoided through timely and effective health care intervention were reduced by 56%. This rate went from 149 per 100,000 Canadians in 1979 to 66 per 100,000 in 2008.”

… continues

Health Indicators 2012 is the 13th in a series of annual reports containing the most recently available health indicators data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Statistics Canada. In addition to presenting the most recent indicator results, this year’s report introduces a suite of new acute-care readmission indicators, as well as three new indicators focusing on avoidable mortality. An in depth analysis of Avoidable mortality indicators is presented in the In-Focus section of the report.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health Indicators 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 24 May 2012 )

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 3 May 2012

Posted on May 4, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 3 May 2012

“Drug spending continues to increase in Canada; overall annual growth has slowed to its lowest rate in 15 years.

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 updates trends in drug spending in Canada, primarily from retail establishments, in total, by public and private payers, and by type of drug (prescribed and non-prescribed). Provincial/territorial and international comparisons are included.”

Media release

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 3 May 2012 )

Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2006 to 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 26 January 2012

Posted on January 27, 2012. Filed under: Nursing, Workforce | Tags: |

Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2006 to 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 26 January 2012

Full text 

Commentary on this from HealthEdition
“LPNs outpace RNs in nursing growth

Over the 2006 to 2010 period the number of licensed practical nurses grew 3.6 times faster than the number of registered nurses, a report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information this week has revealed.”  … continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Regulated Nurses: Canadian Trends, 2006 to 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 26 January 2012 )

Health Care in Canada, 2011: A Focus on Seniors and Aging – CIHI – 1 December 2011

Posted on December 2, 2011. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: |

Health Care in Canada, 2011: A Focus on Seniors and Aging – CIHI Canadian Institute for Health Information- 1 December 2011 

“As the baby boom generation begins to turn 65 this year, the aging of Canada’s population will accelerate. As a result, the health care system will need to adapt to meet the future needs of a growing senior population, according to a new report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). Health Care in Canada, 2011: A Focus on Seniors and Aging shows that, while Canada’s seniors (age 65 and older) are living longer and are healthier than ever, they are frequent users of the health system, costing more than any other segment of the population. Representing just 14% of the population, seniors use 40% of hospital services in Canada and account for about 45% of all provincial and territorial government health spending.

“Although the impact of population aging on health costs has remained relatively stable over time, health care planners and providers are rightfully looking at ways to meet the needs of a growing senior population,” says John Wright, CIHI’s President and CEO. “The number of Canadians age 65 and older is expected to nearly double to 25% of the population by 2036. Understanding where gaps exist and where efforts can be concentrated will help ensure that the system remains strong and efficient for Canadians of all ages.”

CIHI’s report identifies opportunities for the health system to meet these changing needs, including improved integration across the health care continuum, an increased focus on prevention and more efficient adoption and use of new technologies.”

… continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Health Care in Canada, 2011: A Focus on Seniors and Aging – CIHI – 1 December 2011 )

Learning From the Best: Benchmarking Canada’s Health System – Canadian Institute for Health Information – November 2011

Posted on November 25, 2011. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Status | Tags: |

Learning From the Best: Benchmarking Canada’s Health System – Canadian Institute for Health Information – November 2011

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Learning From the Best: Benchmarking Canada’s Health System – Canadian Institute for Health Information – November 2011 )

National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 3 November 2011

Posted on November 4, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: |

National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 3 November 2011

“Total spending on health care in Canada is expected to grow by more than $7 billion this year to reach a forecast $200.5 billion in 2011. This amounts to roughly $5,800 per Canadian, about $150 more per person than last year, according to a new report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2011, one of two CIHI reports released today, shows that growth in health care spending is slowing down. Spending is expected to increase by 4.0% in 2011 over last year—the lowest annual growth rate seen in the last 15 years. In contrast, average annual growth in health care spending between 1998 and 2008 was 7.4%.

While health care spending continues to rise faster than inflation and population growth, it is expected to grow more slowly than the overall economy this year. Spending on health care is forecast to reach 11.6% of Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP) in 2011, a slight decrease from the historic peak of 11.9% in 2009 and 2010. ”

… continues

“CIHI is also releasing another major study today, called Health Care Cost Drivers: The Facts. The report examines the key factors that contributed to the $200-billion milestone. It focuses on public-sector health care spending between 1998 and 2008—a boom period when annual health expenditure in Canada more than doubled—and identifies issues to monitor in the future.

The study shows that in Canada, as in many countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), there was a tendency to spend more on health care during a period of economic growth and higher income. From a fiscal policy perspective, the period from 1998 to 2008 saw a reduction in the interest that governments in Canada had to pay on outstanding debt, which allowed them to divert resources to overall program spending and tax reduction. The major cost drivers of public-sector health care spending in the past decade were compensation of health care providers, increased use of services and an evolution in the types of services provided and used.”

… continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 3 November 2011 )

Obesity in Canada – CIHI – 20 June 2011

Posted on June 24, 2011. Filed under: Preventive Healthcare, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

Obesity in Canada – CIHI – 20 June 2011

“Increased activity and healthier eating can improve obesity rates, but aren’t the only factors at play

Comprehensive new report examines how obesity varies across Canada, who’s most at risk and possible actions to address it

Eliminating all physical inactivity among Canadian adults (defined as less than 15 minutes of low-impact activity a day) could avert the equivalent of 646,000 cases of obesity in women and 405,000 cases in men, according to an analysis included in a comprehensive joint report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) and the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC). Similarly, improving poor-quality diets—as measured by the frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption—could result in the equivalent of 265,000 fewer cases of obesity among men and 97,000 fewer cases of obesity among women. However, people’s ability to achieve higher physical activity levels and healthier eating habits is influenced by many interconnected factors.

“Not surprisingly, this report shows that improving lifestyle behaviours, such as healthy eating and physical activity, can have a significant impact on reducing the waistlines and improving the health of Canadians. However, obesity is complex, and there are many other factors that contribute beyond lifestyle habits,” says Jeremy Veillard, Vice President of Research and Analysis at CIHI. “By shedding light on the factors most closely associated with obesity and how they play out across Canada, policy-makers and health providers can better target prevention and treatment options to meet the needs of the population.”

“Reducing obesity levels and promoting healthy weights is critical to the prevention of ill health,” says Dr. Judith Bossé, Assistant Deputy Minister, Public Health Agency of Canada. “Obesity increases the risk of a number of chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension and some forms of cancers. That’s why we’re examining options to address the factors that lead to obesity, and we are working with various levels of government, non-governmental organizations and other stakeholders on this issue.”

Obesity in Canada provides an overview of the prevalence of obesity among adults, children and youth, and Aboriginal Peoples (First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples); the determinants and impact of obesity across the country; as well as Canadian and international lessons learned in obesity prevention and reduction. Based on measured height and weight, more than 1 in 4 adults in Canada and just less than 1 in 11 children are considered obese. Between 1981 and 2009, obesity based on measured height and weight data roughly doubled across all age groups and tripled for youth (age 12 to 17).”

… continues on the site

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 5 May 2011

Posted on May 6, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Growth in drug spending slows to lowest rate since 1996 – Canada
Patent expiries and generic pricing policies may be factors in slower growth

Download the report: Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2010

“Although drugs remain an important cost driver in Canada’s health system, growth in spending has slowed to its lowest rate in 14 years, according to a new report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). Total drug expenditure is estimated to have reached $31.1 billion in 2010, an increase of $1.4 billion, or 4.8% since 2009. In comparison, the average annual growth rate in drug spending was nearly twice as high between 2000 and 2005, at 8.9%.”  … continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Putting Away the Stethoscope for Good? Toward a New Perspective on Physician Retirement – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 7 April 2011

Posted on April 8, 2011. Filed under: Medicine, Workforce | Tags: , |

Putting Away the Stethoscope for Good? Toward a New Perspective on Physician Retirement – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 7 April 2011

“This study is an attempt to understand how aging affects physicians’ work, including staying in or leaving clinical practice. It also examines both retirement intentions and behaviours, without assuming that they are the same phenomenon.

Canadian physicians tend to quit work later than average workers. Instead of dropping out of the medical workforce abruptly and completely at age 65, many older physicians choose to remain in clinical practice, though they do not necessarily maintain the same activity level or do the same kind of work as when they were younger.

Depending on what “older physicians” refers to and where the full-time equivalent (FTE) threshold is set, different proportions of older physicians could be considered minimally active. For 2007, if the FTE threshold was set at 33% or less of previous workload, the proportion of physicians considered minimally active would range from 7.3% of physicians age 55 and older to 11.9% of physicians 65 and older. If the FTE threshold was set at 15% or less of previous workload, the range of those considered minimally active would be 3.3% to 4.9% for physicians age 55 and older and those age 65 and older, respectively.

The study includes”

…continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Seniors and the Health Care System: What Is the Impact of Multiple Chronic Conditions? – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 27 January 2011

Posted on January 28, 2011. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Chronic Disease Mgmt | Tags: , |

Seniors and the Health Care System: What Is the Impact of Multiple Chronic Conditions? – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 27 January 2011

“The number of health care services seniors use is determined more by the number of chronic conditions they have than by their age, according to a new study from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). The study found that older seniors (85 and older) with no chronic conditions made less than half the number of health care visits as younger seniors (65 to 74) with three or more chronic conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension and heart disease.

CIHI’s study Seniors and the Health Care System: What Is the Impact of Multiple Chronic Conditions? examines how seniors not living in institutions access health services and what kind of care they receive. According to the study, three out of four Canadians age 65 and older reported having at least one chronic condition, while one in four seniors reported having three or more.”

…continues on the website

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Treatment of End-Stage Organ Failure in Canada, 2000 to 2009 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 20 January 2010

Posted on January 21, 2011. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: , |

Treatment of End-Stage Organ Failure in Canada, 2000 to 2009 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 20 January 2011

“The number of Canadians living with kidney failure, otherwise known as end-stage renal disease (ESRD), has been steadily increasing for 20 years, but rates now appear to be stabilizing, according to a new report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry annual report, Treatment of End-Stage Organ Failure in Canada, 2000 to 2009, reveals that close to 38,000 Canadians were living with kidney failure in 2009—more than triple the number (11,000) living with the disease in 1990. The largest increase occurred in older age groups, with prevalence rates escalating by more than 500% for those age 75 and older. Patients in this age group account for 20% of all kidney failure cases.”

…continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Caring for Seniors With Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Forms of Dementia – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 26 August 2010

Posted on August 27, 2010. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: |

Caring for Seniors With Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Forms of Dementia – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 26 August 2010

“In 2007-2008, one in five seniors (20%) receiving long-term home care had a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia. Nearly one in six (17%) of these clients with dementia were suffering from moderate to severe impairment in cognition and daily functioning yet still managed to remain at home.

The study also found that one in six (17%) seniors with dementia living in residential care facilities (such as nursing or long-term care homes) in 2008-2009 had relatively low levels of impairment or could still perform basic functions quite well on their own. The odds of a senior with low impairment being placed in residential care were seven times more likely if the senior had a tendency to wander. Marital status was also a factor in determining whether a senior with low impairment was newly admitted to a care facility rather than at home with home care.”

Full Report
Download Caring for Seniors With Alzheimers Disease and Other Forms of Dementia (PDF) (PDF) 665 KB

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Health Indicators 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 27 May 2010

Posted on May 28, 2010. Filed under: Health Status | Tags: , |

Health Indicators 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 27 May 2010

Pages: 105
Date published: May 27, 2010
ISBN 978-1-55465-738-4 (PDF)

“Health Indicators 2010 is the 11th in a series of annual reports containing the most recently available health indicators data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Statistics Canada. In addition to presenting the latest indicator data, this year’s report focuses on health disparities, the fifth dimension in the framework. The in-focus section of the report examines disparities in the health system using the two most common reasons for hospitalization—heart attacks and hysterectomies. In addition, two health status indicators—heart attack events and injury hospitalizations—are presented by neighbourhood income quintile for each of the provinces along with two summary measures—disparity rate ratio and potential rate reduction.”

Download Health Indicators 2010 (PDF) 1778 KB

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Canadian MIS Database (CMDB), Hospital Financial Performance Indicators, 1999-2000 to 2008-2009 – published 13 May 2010

Posted on May 26, 2010. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: , , |

Canadian MIS Database (CMDB), Hospital Financial Performance Indicators, 1999-2000 to 2008-2009

Canadian Institute for Health Information     Pages: 23

“Understanding how hospital financial information changes over time is critical to evaluating hospital performance. Canadian MIS Database, Hospital Financial Performance Indicators, 1999-2000 to 2008-2009 reports on regional level hospital performance using 2008-2009 data. This report is an update to information previously reported in Canadian MIS Database, Hospital Financial Performance Indicators 1999-2000 to 2008-2009. CIHI will continue to monitor the ongoing feasibility of using data from the CMDB in the future to produce and report any additional indicators

The indicators that are used in this report are:

Total Margin
Current Ratio
Administrative Expense as a Percentage of Total Expense
Information Systems as a Percentage of Total Expense
Cost per Weighted Case
Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours for Patient Care Functional Centres as a Percentage of Total Worked Hours
Nursing Inpatient Services Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
Diagnostic Services Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
Clinical Laboratory Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
Pharmacy Unit-producing Personnel Worked Hours per Weighted Case
Average Age of Equipment ”

Full Report
Download Canadian MIS Database (CMDB), Hospital Financial Performance Indicators, 1999-2000 to 2008-2009 (PDF) 561 KB

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

H1N1 in Canada—A Context for Understanding Patients and Their Use of Hospital Services – 11 February 2010

Posted on February 15, 2010. Filed under: Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu | Tags: , |

“H1N1 patients required more intensive hospital care than typical flu patients

February 11, 2010—When compared to a typical flu, the H1N1 virus resulted in a higher proportion of patients requiring specialized hospital services—and affected younger people more—according to a new study released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

The study, H1N1 in Canada—A Context for Understanding Patients and Their Use of Hospital Services,is the first of its kind to examine at a pan-Canadian level how hospitalizations for H1N1 differed from hospitalizations associated with a typical flu. It compares Public Health Agency of Canada FluWatch analysis from April to December 2009 with CIHI hospital statistics for the baseline year 2007–2008. The comparison group included patients with influenza and/or pneumonia, the most common complication of influenza.

“The H1N1 pandemic was met with an unprecedented response from public health officials. As the spread of the virus subsides, it is important to pause and look at how H1N1 compares to a typical flu season,” says Jean-Marie Berthelot, Vice President of Programs at CIHI. “Our study shows that proportionately more H1N1 patients needed specialized and intensive hospital services than what we’ve come to expect in a typical flu season.”

Specifically, the study found that from April 12, 2009, to January 2, 2010, the proportion of hospitalized H1N1 patients requiring intensive care was 50% higher than for those admitted to hospital with influenza or pneumonia in the baseline year—with almost one in six H1N1 hospitalized patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). In addition, an estimated 1 in 10 patients admitted to hospital with H1N1 required ventilation to assist with breathing; proportionally, this was more than double the influenza/pneumonia group.”

…continues on the website

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Diabetes Care Gaps and Disparities in Canada – 3 December 2009

Posted on December 11, 2009. Filed under: Diabetes | Tags: |

Diabetes Care Gaps and Disparities in Canada – 3 December 2009

Press release

December 3, 2009—While most Canadian adults living with diabetes get regular care, they are not always getting all of the clinically recommended tests they require to prevent health complications. A new study released by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) looked at the extent to which Canadians age 18 and older living with diabetes received four specific tests. Although many receive individual tests, such as blood glucose (HbA1c) tests, urine protein tests and dilated eye exams, and are having their feet checked for sores or irritations, the results found that fewer than one-third (32%) reported receiving all four of these clinically recommended tests from their health providers.

“This indicates there is room for improvement in the care Canadians living with diabetes are receiving,” says Greg Webster, Director of Primary Health Care Information at CIHI. “Better management and control of diabetes can help prevent serious health complications and prolong life for people with diabetes.”   … continues on the press release website

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Canadian Institute for Health Information, In Focus: A National Look at Sepsis – 10 December 2009

Posted on December 11, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

Canadian Institute for Health Information, In Focus: A National Look at Sepsis
(Ottawa, Ont.: CIHI, 2009).   Canadian Institute for Health Information
ISBN 978-1-55465-658-5 (PDF)

Canadian Institute for Health Information 2009 Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio (HSMR) Public Release

“December 10—A new study shows that in 2008–2009 more than 9,300 patients died of sepsis, a condition resulting from the body’s response to severe infection, in Canadian hospitals outside Quebec.” …continues on the website

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Health Care in Canada 2009: A Decade in Review – October 2009

Posted on October 30, 2009. Filed under: Health Status, Health Systems Improvement, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

Health Care in Canada 2009: A Decade in Review

About the review – information copied from Health Edition

10-year retrospective produced by CIHI
October 30, 2009

“The Canadian Institute for Health Information published the 10th edition of its Health Care in Canada report this week – an annual snapshot of the state of health care in the country. This anniversary edition takes the opportunity to look back at what has happened in health care and some of the issues that lie ahead.

Health care funding is one of the subjects discussed in the 120-page report, and it says that while there is an abundance of information about health expenditures there is no method yet in place to know what value is created.

“We can readily describe how much money goes where in many different ways. Interpretation, however, is far more difficult and contentious because there is no standard approach to linking volumes and activity to clinical and population health outcomes. Nor is there a method for comparing observed to ‘ideal’ efficiency, or otherwise assessing value for money. All we can say for sure is that the system got a good deal more costly during the past decade.”

The lack of health outcomes data is mentioned a number of times in the report. CIHI expects to produce a report on this subject next spring. It will propose short- and long-term options for upgrading the availability of health care outcomes information.

CIHI says the emergence of new information technologies, like electronic health records (EHRs), promise a veritable “treasure trove” of data to help answer a number of key questions about Canadian health care, and delve into the interconnection between health status, health care needs, services and outcomes. However, it says much depends on whether privacy rules will permit this depth of analysis and if the necessary technical capability is built into new EHR systems.

The democratization of health-care information, accessible through the Internet, has been another major development of the last decade that is yet to demonstrate its full impact especially if the current policy focus on patient-centred care grabs hold.

“In that event, one can envision interactive EHRs, intense measurement and reporting on the patient experience, and portals that allow the public to view, and even analyze, previously inaccessible data. Vigorously pursued, these developments would stand the system on its head,” the report says.

Health Care in Canada 2009: A Decade in Review can be found at http://www.cihi.ca.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...