Patient / Family Advisory Councils in Ontario Hospitals – At Work, In Play – The Change Foundation [Toronto, Canada] – 1 April 2014

Posted on April 8, 2014. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: |

Patient / Family Advisory Councils in Ontario Hospitals – At Work, In Play – The Change Foundation [Toronto, Canada] – 1 April 2014

““We’re making a culture change here, of trying to engage our patients more in decision making and moving away from advising” (PFAC staff interview).
This report investigates the evolving function and best practices of Ontario’s hospital-based Patient/Family Advisory Councils (PFACs): one mechanism some hospitals are using – among other approaches – to advance patient/family engagement and patient-centred care.

This 3-part preliminary report aims to guide, connect and inspire by presenting thematic findings with examples of challenges and successes (part 1); quantitative data (part 2); and listings of PFAC initiatives, with contacts (part 3). The Foundation interviewed patients, family and staff from 29 hospitals about the functioning and impact of their councils.

Hospitals early in their PFAC journey can learn from those ahead of them. In future, we hope to expand our review beyond hospitals, reporting on PFACs and related bodies in other healthcare sectors.””

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Winning Conditions to Improve Patient Experiences: Integrated Healthcare in Ontario – Change Foundation – November 2011

Posted on December 7, 2011. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , |

Winning Conditions to Improve Patient Experiences: Integrated Healthcare in Ontario – Change Foundation – November 2011

“In this report, The Change Foundation offers its best advice on how Ontario can move closer to an integrated health system and improve the experience of  individuals and caregivers. It is based on work conducted and commissioned by the Foundation and on published research. It draws on what we have learned from other jurisdictions, and is informed by discussions with government officials, policy experts, regional planners and, most importantly, individuals and caregivers.”

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Because this is the rainy day: a discussion paper on home care and informal caregiving for seniors with chronic health conditions – The Change Foundation (Ontario) – February 2011

Posted on February 15, 2011. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Chronic Disease Mgmt | Tags: |

Because this is the rainy day: a discussion paper on home care and informal caregiving for seniors with chronic health conditions – The Change Foundation (Ontario) – February 2011

“Can we provide good care at home for seniors with chronic health conditions? If so, at what cost? And to whom?To explore these questions, The Change Foundation commissioned leading home-care expert Dr. John Hirdes, (Professor, University of Waterloo and Scientific Director, Homewood Research Institute), to examine data on Ontario seniors with chronic conditions to help us understand how they use home-care services, what their health-care needs are as they move from hospital to home and/or community care, and what the implications are for their caregivers.”

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Experiences with the transition between hospital and long term care – Canadian reports

Posted on October 30, 2009. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: |

Issues for seniors leaving hospital explored
Info copied from Health Edition. October 30, 2009

“A pilot project in two Ontario health regions has produced valuable information on the difficulties encountered by elderly patients leaving hospital. The project, a partnership of the Ontario Association of Community Care Access Centres and the Ontario Hospital Association’s Change Foundation, involved interviews with 30 recently discharged patients and their caregivers and from observations drawn from shadowing key staff, and tracking and analyzing the myriad steps in the journey from hospital to home care or from hospital to long-term care. One of the key conclusions was that patients and caregivers need more “face time” with key staff to navigate a complex, confusing system. There are 160 steps in the hospital-to-long-term care process alone. Patients and caregivers feel rushed in reaching life-changing decisions and unclear about care options, and information they receive is heavily oriented to long-term care choices. Links to the two reports and a commentary can be found at the Change Foundation’s website. “

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