Practical Playbook – Public Health . Primary Care. Together. – CDC – Duke University School of Medicine , de Beaumont Foundation

Posted on March 10, 2014. Filed under: General Practice, Primary Hlth Care, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Practical Playbook – Public Health . Primary Care. Together. – CDC – Duke University School of Medicine , de Beaumont Foundation

“What is the Practical Playbook?

The Practical Playbook is a stepping stone in the next transformation of health, in which primary care and public health groups collaborate to achieve population health improvement and reduced health care costs. It supports increased collaborations between primary care and public health groups by guiding users through the stages of integrated population health improvement. Throughout each stage, the Practical Playbook provides helpful resources such as success stories from across the country, lessons-learned from existing partnerships, and further guidance from industry experts.

We use the playbook metaphor because improving collaboration between public health and primary care takes a thoughtful game plan. Like a sports playbook, the Practical Playbook defines the role of each team member as well as actions for different situations. As a playbook, it’s neither a rulebook nor a set of peer-reviewed guidelines. It’s something more practical – because we need real-life, flexible guidance to help us apply the theoretical principles of integration to our work.”

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The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress – CDC – January 2014

Posted on January 23, 2014. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.

 

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Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 – CDC – 16 September 2013

Posted on September 17, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , |

Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 – CDC – 16 September 2013

“This report, Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 gives a first-ever snapshot of the burden and threats posed by the antibiotic-resistant germs having the most impact on human health.

Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections. Many more people die from other conditions that were complicated by an antibiotic-resistant infection.

Antibiotic-resistant infections can happen anywhere. Data show that most happen in the general community; however, most deaths related to antibiotic resistance happen in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes.”

Press release: Untreatable: Report by CDC details today’s drug-resistant health threats Landmark report ranks threats, outlines four core actions to halt resistance

Digital Press Kit: Untreatable: Today’s Drug-Resistant Health Threats

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Mental Health Surveillance Among Children in the United States – 2005-2011 – CDC – 16 May 2013

Posted on May 17, 2013. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Mental Health Psychi Psychol | Tags: , |

Mental Health Surveillance Among Children in the United States – 2005-2011 – CDC – 16 May 2013

CDC issues first comprehensive report on children’s mental health in the United States

Report is an important step to better understand childhood mental disorders and help children reach their full potential in life

Children’s mental disorders affect boys and girls of all ages, ethnic/racial backgrounds, and regions of the United States.  Previous studies estimate up to 1 in 5 children have mental disorder and a new CDC MMWR Supplement finds that millions of American children live with depression, anxiety, ADHD, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette syndrome or a host of other mental health issues. The MMWR Supplement titled, “Mental Health Surveillance Among Children in the United States, 2005-2011,” is the first-ever report to describe federal efforts on monitoring mental disorders, and presents estimates of the number of children aged 3-17 years with specific mental disorders, compiling information from different data sources covering the period of 2005-2011.”

… continues

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New CDC Vital Signs: Lethal, Drug-resistant Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Healthcare Facilities – 5 March 2013

Posted on March 6, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

New CDC Vital Signs: Lethal, Drug-resistant Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Healthcare Facilities – 5 March 2013

“Drug-resistant germs called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, are on the rise and have become more resistant to last-resort antibiotics during the past decade, according to a new CDC Vital Signs report.  These bacteria are causing more hospitalized patients to get infections that, in some cases, are impossible to treat.”

… continues on the site

Making Health Care Safer: Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now – CDC Vital Signs – March 2013

“Untreatable and hard-to-treat infections from CRE germs are on the rise among patients in medical facilities. CRE germs have become resistant to all or nearly all the antibiotics we have today. Types of CRE include KPC and NDM. By following CDC guidelines, we can halt CRE infections before they become widespread in hospitals and other medical facilities and potentially spread to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities.”

… continues

Media release: CDC: Action needed now to halt spread of deadly bacteria

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Health Equity Resource Toolkit for State Practitioners Addressing Obesity Disparities – CDC Div of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) – 2012

Posted on October 22, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

Health Equity Resource Toolkit for State Practitioners Addressing Obesity Disparities – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) – 2012

“The purpose of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity (DNPAO) Health Equity Resource Toolkit for State Practitioners Addressing Obesity Disparities is to increase the capacity of state health departments and their partners to work with and through communities to implement effective responses to obesity in populations that are facing health disparities. The Toolkit’s primary focus is on how to create policy, systems, and environmental changes that will reduce obesity disparities and achieve health equity. For the purpose of this Toolkit, “policy” refers to procedures or practices that apply to large sectors which can influence complex  systems in ways that can improve the health and safety of a population. States are already conducting activities to address obesity across populations. This Toolkit provides guidance on how to supplement and compliment existing efforts. It provides evidence-informed and real-world examples of addressing disparities by illustrating how the concepts presented can be promoted in programs to achieve health equity using three evidence-informed strategies as examples:
1. Increasing access to fruits and vegetables via healthy food retail with a focus on underserved communities.
2. Engaging in physical activity that can be achieved by increased opportunities for walking with a focus on the disabled community, and other subpopulations that face disparities.
3. Decreasing consumption of sugar drinks with an emphasis on access to fresh, potable (clean) water with a particular focus on adolescents and other high consumers.

Though the Toolkit utilizes these three strategies as examples, the planning and evaluation process described in the Toolkit can be applied to other evidence-informed strategies to control and prevent obesity.”

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Health, United States, 2011 – CDC – May 2012

Posted on May 28, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Health, United States, 2011 – CDC – May 2012

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CDC now tracking antibiotic use in hospitals – 14 November 2011

Posted on November 15, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

CDC now tracking antibiotic use in hospitals – 14 November 2011

“Get Smart About Antibiotics Week 2011 spotlights importance of appropriate antibiotic use

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is launching a new antibiotic tracking system allowing hospitals to monitor antibiotic use electronically, make better decisions about how to improve use, and compare themselves to other hospitals. Before now, CDC was only able to track antibiotic use in doctors′ offices.

Each year, millions of Americans take antibiotics to fight infections. But overuse and misuse of antibiotics can change germs, allowing them to evolve resistance to antibiotics, which increases the risk of an infection for which there are limited or no treatment options. Patients who receive antibiotics can experience side effects, including allergic reactions and may be at increased risk for Clostridium difficile infection, a potentially deadly diarrheal infection.

“Antibiotic use leads to antibiotic resistance, which is a major public health problem,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. “Hospitals and other health care facilities should monitor the antibiotics used in their facilities. This new system is a powerful tool that will enhance providers′ ability to monitor and improve patterns of antibiotic use so that these essential drugs will still be effective in the years to come.”

The antibiotic use tracking system is part of CDC′s National Healthcare Safety Network, the nation′s premier tool for monitoring infections in health care facilities, which includes over 4,800 hospitals. CDC has funded four health departments and their academic partners to implement the tracking system in 70 hospitals. In addition, any hospital that participates in the National Healthcare Safety Network can utilize this tool by working directly with its pharmacy software vendor to transmit data electronically from drug administration or barcoding records. There is no manual entry of data, thus saving a facility time and money.”

… continues on the site

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Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit now available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Updated July 2011

Posted on October 26, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

Health Communicator’s Social Media Toolkit  now available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Updated July 2011

“A guide to using social media to improve reach of health messages, increase access to your content, further participation with audiences and advance transparency to improve health communication efforts.”

“This toolkit was developed by the Electronic Media Branch, Division of News and Electronic Media, Office of the Associate Director of Communication at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It was designed to provide guidance and to the share lessons learned in more than three years of integrating social media into CDC health communication campaigns, activities and emergency response efforts. In this guide, you will find information to help you get started using social media—from developing governance to determining which channels best meet your communication objectives to creating a social media strategy. You will also learn about popular channels you can incorporate into your plan, such as blogs, video-sharing sites, mobile applications and RSS feeds. This toolkit is intended for a beginner audience, although some viewers with an intermediate level may find parts of the toolkit useful.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – Social Media at CDC

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Making Food Safer to Eat: Reducing contamination from the farm to the table – CDC – June 2011

Posted on June 29, 2011. Filed under: Dietetics, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Making Food Safer to Eat: Reducing contamination from the farm to the table – CDC – June 2011

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Enhancing Use of Clinical Preventive Services Among Older Adults: Closing the Gap – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – 2011

Posted on March 25, 2011. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Preventive Healthcare | Tags: , |

Enhancing Use of Clinical Preventive Services Among Older Adults: Closing the Gap – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – 2011

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Administration on Aging, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Enhancing Use of Clinical Preventive Services Among Older Adults. Washington, DC: AARP, 2011.

“This new report, Enhancing Use of Clinical Preventive Services Among Older Adults – Closing the Gap, calls attention to the use of potentially lifesaving preventive services by our nation’s growing population of adults aged 65 years and older. By presenting and interpreting available state and national self-reported survey data, the Report aims to raise awareness among public health and aging services professionals, policy makers, the media, and researchers of critical gaps and opportunities for increasing the use of clinical preventive services, particularly among those who are currently underserved.”

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CDC award boosts hospital labs’ ability to report results

Posted on February 22, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pathology, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

CDC award boosts hospital labs’ ability to report results
By Mary Mosquera
Monday, February 21, 2011

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded a grant to three organizations to help connect hospital laboratories with public health agencies so they can electronically transmit data on reportable laboratory results.

The three organizations — e-prescribing network Surescripts, the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) — will provide the necessary technical assistance to enable hospital labs to begin transmitting results within six months, according to an announcement by Surescripts.

They will work together in what the CDC calls a “lab interoperability cooperative” to promote the exchange of test results and patient information to support meaningful use. 

During the two year grant period, AHA, Surescripts and CAP, which is the medical society for physicians and the laboratory community, will recruit, educate and connect a minimum of 500 hospital labs to the appropriate public health agencies.

At least 100 of the hospital labs will be critical access or rural hospitals, the groups involved said.

The CDC grant will help hospital laboratories meet criteria established by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT for meaningful use of EHRs, including submission of electronic data on reportable laboratory results to public health agencies.

While technical standards exist to enable the secure electronic exchange of lab results, few commercial labs, hospitals and providers use them. The lab cooperative will engage with hospital labs, which handle the majority of lab tests, to advance lab interoperability with public health agencies.

“As a result of this effort, hundreds of hospitals will engage in electronic reporting that helps public health act more rapidly and efficiently to control disease,” said Seth Foldy, director of CDC’s Public Health Informatics and Technology Program Office.”

…continues on the site

also reported here:

Project to assist hospital labs in submitting electronic data
February 21, 2011 | Molly Merrill, Associate Editor

“Surescripts, the American Hospital Association and the College of American Pathologists have been awarded a $4.9 million grant to launch a program to prepare hospitals to submit electronic data on reportable lab results to public health agencies – a Stage 1 requirement for meeting meaningful use incentives.

The grant from the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which was announced Monday, will allow the three organizations to work together in what the CDC calls a “Lab Interoperability Cooperative.”

During the two-year grant period, the AHA, CAP and Surescripts will recruit, educate and connect a minimum of 500 hospital labs – of which 100 are critical access or rural hospitals – to the appropriate public health agencies.

The network will support all federal and state policies and standards for health information exchange, including privacy and security standards (such as HIPAA and state law), technology interoperability standards (such as NHIN Direct and NHIN Exchange) and message types such as HL7.

The cooperative will provide technical assistance to enable hospital labs to begin transmitting lab results electronically within six months, but officials said that assistance has not yet been defined.

The AHA will take the lead on educating and reaching out to hospitals about the project.

The CAP will “actively leverage our relationships with its 17,000 pathologists,” said Debra J. Konicek, MSN, RN, BC, the college’s director of clinical consulting and mapping.

The goal of the project is to assist hospitals to electronically report a core set of 75-100 lab reports to public health agencies, said Konicek. Hospitals are already required to report this, but the network will prepare them to do it in real time, she said.”

…continues on the site

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General Recommendations on Immunization – CDC – 28 January 2011

Posted on February 4, 2011. Filed under: Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , |

General Recommendations on Immunization – CDC – 28 January 2011

Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)
Recommendations and Reports

“Summary
This report is a revision of the General Recommendations on Immunization and updates the 2006 statement by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) .”

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MMWR 6 August 2010 – Prevention and control of influenza with vaccines: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010

Posted on August 19, 2010. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu | Tags: , |

MMWR Recomm Rep. 2010 Aug 6;59(RR-8):1-62.
Prevention and control of influenza with vaccines: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), 2010.

Fiore AE, Uyeki TM, Broder K, Finelli L, Euler GL, Singleton JA, Iskander JK, Wortley PM, Shay DK, Bresee JS, Cox NJ; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MS A-20, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Abstract
This report updates the 2009 recommendations by CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the use of influenza vaccine for the prevention and control of influenza (CDC. Prevention and control of influenza: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP]. MMWR 2009;58[No. RR-8] and CDC. Use of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine—recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices [ACIP], 2009. MMWR 2009;58:[No. RR-10]). The 2010 influenza recommendations include new and updated information. Highlights of the 2010 recommendations include 1) a recommendation that annual vaccination be administered to all persons aged >or=6 months for the 2010-11 influenza season; 2) a recommendation that children aged 6 months–8 years whose vaccination status is unknown or who have never received seasonal influenza vaccine before (or who received seasonal vaccine for the first time in 2009-10 but received only 1 dose in their first year of vaccination) as well as children who did not receive at least 1 dose of an influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine regardless of previous influenza vaccine history should receive 2 doses of a 2010-11 seasonal influenza vaccine (minimum interval: 4 weeks) during the 2010–11 season; 3) a recommendation that vaccines containing the 2010-11 trivalent vaccine virus strains A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like (the same strain as was used for 2009 H1N1 monovalent vaccines), A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like, and B/Brisbane/60/2008-like antigens be used; 4) information about Fluzone High-Dose, a newly approved vaccine for persons aged >or=65 years; and 5) information about other standard-dose newly approved influenza vaccines and previously approved vaccines with expanded age indications. Vaccination efforts should begin as soon as the 2010-11 seasonal influenza vaccine is available and continue through the influenza season. These recommendations also include a summary of safety data for U.S.-licensed influenza vaccines. These recommendations and other information are available at CDC’s influenza website (http://www.cdc.gov/flu); any updates or supplements that might be required during the 2010-11 influenza season also will be available at this website. Recommendations for influenza diagnosis and antiviral use will be published before the start of the 2010-11 influenza season. Vaccination and health-care providers should be alert to announcements of recommendation updates and should check the CDC influenza website periodically for additional information.

PMID: 20689501 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

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CDC – project to monitor chronic disease and health promotion indicators – 15 July 2010

Posted on July 19, 2010. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

[Federal Register: July 15, 2010 (Volume 75, Number 135)]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]             

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

“Proposed Project

    Monitoring and Reporting System for Chronic Disease Prevention and  Control Programs–New–National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

Background and Brief Description

    Although chronic diseases are among the most common and costly health problems, they are also among the most preventable. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) works with states, territories, tribal organizations, and the District of Columbia (collectively referred to as “state-based” programs) to develop, implement, manage, and evaluate chronic disease prevention and control programs. Support and guidance for these programs have been provided through cooperative agreement funding and technical assistance, administered by CDC’s National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP). Partnerships and collaboration with other Federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations, local communities, public and private sector organizations, and major voluntary associations have been critical to the success of these efforts.

    CDC seeks OMB approval for three years to collect progress and activity information from health departments funded for four program areas: Tobacco control, diabetes prevention and control, Healthy Communities, and state-based behavioral risk factor surveillance. Information will be collected electronically through a new, electronic Management Information System (MIS). Information will be collected on each program area’s objectives, planning activities, resources, partnerships, policy and environmental strategies for preventing or controlling chronic diseases, and progress toward meeting goals. The new MIS harmonizes the progress reporting framework for all program areas and will support the collection of accurate, reliable, uniform and timely information. The MIS will generate a variety of routine and customizable reports that will allow each State or program to summarize its activities and progress. CDC will also have the capacity to generate reports that describe activities across multiple States and/or programs. The new MIS will replace two previously approved systems used by tobacco control programs (OMB No. 0920-0601, exp. 5/31/2010) and diabetes prevention and control programs (OMB No. 0920-0479, exp. 4/30/2013), which are being phased out.

    CDC will use the information collection to monitor each program’s progress and use of federal funds, to identify strengths and weaknesses, to make adjustments in the type and level of technical assistance provided to programs, and to respond to inquiries. Respondents will use the information collection to manage and coordinate their activities and to improve their efforts to prevent and control chronic diseases.    The initial set of respondents will be health departments in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. All awardees will report on tobacco control, diabetes prevention and control, behavioral risk factor surveillance, and Healthy Communities, with the exception of the District of Columbia, which is not currently participating in Healthy Communities.    Information will be collected electronically twice per year. There are no costs to respondents other than their time. The total estimated annualized burden hours are 2,532.”

…continues on the website

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CDC Vital Signs – launched July 2010

Posted on July 8, 2010. Filed under: Health Status, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

CDC Vital Signs

“CDC Vital Signs is a new series of MMWR reports that will announce the latest results for key public health indicators.

Most adults are getting recommended breast and colorectal cancer screenings. Yet a new CDC report says more than 22 million adults have not had screening tests for colorectal cancer, and more than 7 million women have not had a recent mammogram to screen for breast cancer as recommended. This CDC report also points out why more people need to get tested for colorectal and breast cancer and what can be done to increase screening.”

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Emergency Department Visitors and Visits: Who Used the Emergency Room in 2007? CDC – published May 2010

Posted on May 21, 2010. Filed under: Emergency Medicine | Tags: |

Emergency Department Visitors and Visits: Who Used the Emergency Room in 2007? CDC – published May 2010

“Since 1996, demand for emergency services in the United States has been rising (1). While the number of emergency departments (EDs) across the country has decreased, the number of ED visits has increased (1). As a result, EDs are experiencing higher patient volume and overcrowding, and patients seeking care are experiencing longer wait times (2,3). As national health care costs continue to rise and policymakers become increasingly interested in ways to make the health care system more efficient, it is important to understand the characteristics of those individuals who use EDs—often in place of other sources of ambulatory care.”

Media report in US Today on the study:
Study: Uninsured don’t go to the ER more than insured 

…”The aim of “Emergency Department Visitors and Visits: Who Used the Emergency Room in 2007?” was to determine the types of visitors who use hospital ERs. 

The results may surprise some who believe that ERs mainly serve uninsured people, says second author Amy Bernstein, chief of the Analytic Studies Branch in the Office of Analysis and Epidemiology for the CDC and the National Center for Health Statistics.”

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Know Hepatitis – new CDC website – February 2010

Posted on March 23, 2010. Filed under: Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , , , |

“In the report Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C , the IOM warned that lack of knowledge and awareness about hepatitis B and C can contribute to continued transmission, missed opportunities for early diagnosis and medical care, and poor health outcomes in infected people. This February, in response to the IOM’s recommendation to improve knowledge and awareness through educational programs, the CDC launched Know Hepatitis.org. This website targets community-based health care providers and social service providers on the front lines of hepatitis prevention and provides basic information about the problem of chronic viral hepatitis.”

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A Population-Based Policy and Systems Change Approach to Prevent and Control Hypertension – IOM – 22 February 2010

Posted on February 25, 2010. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , |

A Population-Based Policy and Systems Change Approach to Prevent and Control Hypertension
Released: February 22, 2010
Type: Consensus Report 
Full text of the report       Press release         Report brief     

Activity: Public Health Priorities to Reduce and Control Hypertension in the U.S. Population
Board(s): Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice

“Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is one of the nation’s leading causes of death, responsible for roughly one in six deaths among adults annually. Nearly one in three adults has hypertension, which places huge economic demands on the health care system, estimated at $73.4 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2009 alone.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which leads the federal government’s efforts to reduce the impact of hypertension, asked the IOM to identify high-priority areas on which public health organizations and professionals should focus in order to accelerate progress in hypertension reduction and control.

In this report, the IOM recommends that the CDC as well as state and local health jurisdictions focus on population-based strategies that can reach large numbers of people and improve the well-being of entire communities. Behavioral and lifestyle interventions–reducing sodium intake, increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables, and increasing physical activity–are among the best examples. The report also highlights the need to improve providers’ adherence to the treatment guidelines for hypertension, especially in the elderly population, and to encourage patients to take medication consistently by reducing or eliminating the cost of antihypertensive medication.”

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CDC to Monitor Reactions and Errors Associated with Blood Transfusions – 18 February 2010

Posted on February 22, 2010. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Haematology, Pathology, Patient Safety | Tags: , , |

CDC to Monitor Reactions and Errors Associated with Blood Transfusions – 18 February 2010

Extracts from the CDC press release:

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has launched the first national surveillance system to monitor adverse events in patients who receive blood transfusions. CDC is encouraging healthcare facilities across the country to enroll in this new surveillance system, which was designed to improve patient safety.

By having a coordinated national network, CDC can summarize national data to understand better how to prevent adverse transfusion events such as reactions to blood products, medical errors, and process problems. The system, called the Hemovigilance Module, is part of CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). NHSN is an Internet-based surveillance system that allows healthcare-associated infection data to be tracked and analyzed to allow CDC and healthcare facilities to maximize prevention efforts. The Hemovigilance Module was developed by CDC in collaboration with AABB, an international association representing organizations involved in transfusion and cellular therapies.”  …..

“Hospitals will submit data confidentially to CDC through the Hemovigilance Module. CDC will review the national data in collaboration with AABB and other partners to help identify ways to improve the safety of blood transfusion. Previously, transfusion-related events were monitored by facilities on their own. Now, hospitals that join the Hemovigilance Module will have access to standardized data analysis tools, as well as an opportunity to see how their data compare to other hospitals throughout the United States.”  …

“CDC provides the module at no cost to hospitals and healthcare facilities. The agency also provides participating facilities with training and ongoing user support at no cost to the facilities.”

For more information, please visit the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) .

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Health information technology use among men and women aged 18–64 – February 2010

Posted on February 5, 2010. Filed under: Health Informatics | Tags: |

Cohen RA, Stussman B. Health information technology use among men and women aged 18–64: Early release of estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2009. Health E-Stats. National Center for Health Statistics. February 2010.        Centers for Disease Control

“The dynamic involvement of consumers in managing their own health care includes activities such as the use of computers (hardware and software) to access, retrieve, store, or share health care information. This may include using the Internet to look up health information, using e-mail or text messaging to communicate with health care providers or pharmacies, and having an electronic health record. As the percentage of adults in the U.S. who use the Internet continues to grow, the Internet may become increasingly important as a source of health information for consumers. Although use of the Internet has the potential to improve consumer health by facilitating communication between providers and patients, and among providers, previous research (1) has found that many consumers are concerned about security and confidentiality issues related to scheduling medical appointments or accessing personal health records online.”
 
… continues online

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CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year

Posted on August 26, 2009. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu | Tags: |

CDC Guidance for Responses to Influenza for Institutions of Higher Education during the 2009-2010 Academic Year
US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Status of State Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems – United States, 2007 – published 30 July 2009

Posted on August 2, 2009. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , , |

Status of State Electronic Disease Surveillance Systems – United States, 2007 – published 30 July 2009

“The National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS) is a web-based system that uses standard health information technology (IT) codes to integrate disease surveillance systems, enabling them to transfer public health, laboratory, and clinical data securely from health-care providers to public health departments (1). Each jurisdictions’ system consists of a base system and modules that can be used for specific surveillance purposes. States also use NEDSS-like or other electronic systems to conduct surveillance on specific diseases or conditions.* Until recently, no assessment had been done to describe the status and characteristics of state electronic disease surveillance systems. The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) conducted such an assessment in August 2007 in all 50 states. This report presents the results of that assessment, which indicated that, in 2007, state electronic disease surveillance systems varied widely and were in various stages of implementation. Each state had either custom-built systems or purchased systems that were customizable, with associated disease modules to meet its own surveillance needs. As interoperability becomes the standard for electronic data sharing, more states will face customization costs and the need to hire more technical specialists who can manage health information and exchange. Further collaboration and support from surveillance and health-care IT stakeholders with public health will be needed to improve the efficacy and quality of electronic disease surveillance systems.”  .. continues on the website

Full text of the report:  CDC. NEDSS: National Electronic Disease Surveillance System. CDC Solutions; 2007

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CDC/CSTE Development of Applied Epidemiology Competencies – November 2008

Posted on August 2, 2009. Filed under: Workforce | Tags: , , , |

CDC/CSTE Development of Applied Epidemiology Competencies – November 2008
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE)  – [US]

“CSTE and CDC are pleased to release a newly developed toolkit to help epidemiologists and other public health practitioners understand and incorporate the CDC/CSTE Competencies for Applied Epidemiologists in Governmental Public Health Agencies (AECs) into everyday practice. The toolkit includes the following items:

* Complete AECs document
* Preface document and Short Summaries of the AECs
* Informational brochure
* Competency evaluation forms
* Sample position descriptions
* CD that includes an interactive quiz and an informational PowerPoint presentation

We encourage individual epidemiologists, public health agencies, and academic centers to use the competencies and contents of the toolkit and to move with us toward a common goal of improving epidemiologic practice. We will publish additional information about the competencies, including tools and documentation to support their use,on this  and on the CDC website.

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National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (US) – website launched by CDC – 7 July 2009

Posted on July 9, 2009. Filed under: Environmental Health | Tags: , |

National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (US) – website launched by CDC – 7 July 2009

Press release
“CDC Launches New Environmental Public Health Tracking Network
Revolutionary Environmental Health Tracking Tool designed to help improve and protect our nation’s health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced today the launch of the Web-based Environmental Public Health Tracking Network, a surveillance tool that scientists, health professionals, and – for the first time – members of the public can use to track environmental exposures and chronic health conditions.

“The ability to examine many data sets together for the first time has already resulted in faster responses to environmental health issues.  We believe the Tracking Network holds the potential to shed new light on some of our biggest environmental health questions,” said Howard Frumkin, M.D., M.P.H., DrPh., director,  of CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health.

The web-based tool unites vital environmental information from across the country, including air and water pollutants  and  information for some chronic conditions, including asthma, cancer, childhood lead poisoning and heart disease into one resource.

While scientists know exposures such as air particle pollution and lead contribute to illnesses, many environmental and health connections remain unproven since detailed health and environmental data existed in separate silos until now.”  …continues on the website

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Guidance for Control of Infections with Carbapenem-Resistant or Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Acute Care Facilities CDC 20 March 2009

Posted on April 17, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Guidance for Control of Infections with Carbapenem-Resistant or Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Acute Care Facilities
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guidance for Control of Infections with Carbapenem-Resistant or Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Acute Care Facilities. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [Serial online] 2009 Mar 20;58(10):256-260.

Infection with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae is emerging as an important challenge in health care settings. This threatens to become a problem akin to MRSA. Institutions must be alert for this and other very resistant organisms (ESBL, CTX producing gram negatives, etc.) and not limit foci to C. difficile and MRSA.

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