Accelerating Healthcare Improvement in Canada: A Review of Policy Options to Sustain, Improve and Transform Healthcare – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 13 March 2013

Posted on April 2, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: |

Accelerating Healthcare Improvement in Canada: A Review of Policy Options to Sustain, Improve and Transform Healthcare – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 13 March 2013

Extract from the Key Messages:

“In Canada and around the world, health expenditures have been rising at a faster rate than GDP growth. The rate of growth in health care spending has raised concerns in policy discourse about the financial sustainability of Canada’s publicly-financed healthcare systems and other public healthcare spending.

The Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) – now known as the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) – embarked on an initative commissioned by Health Canada referred to as Healthcare FiT (Financing, innovation and Transformation) in 2011 to synthesize evidence on cost drivers, options to improve efficiency, extend financing and to examine health system transformation in Canada. The information contained in this report is meant to provide a preliminary overview and analysis of options that can be further explored and advanced to support improvement initiatives that aim to change the ways in which healthcare in Canada is organized, financed, managed and delivered.

The analysis of the Healthcare FiT inititative suggests that there are many unique policy options available at different levels of decision-making. This report focuses on four areas of health system design covered by the analysis: physician remuneration, hospital funding, pharmaceutical pricing and reimbursement, and options to extend financing where gaps exist in public insurance coverage.”

… continues

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Strengthening Primary Health Care through Primary Care and Public Health Collaboration – McMaster University – October 2012

Posted on November 20, 2012. Filed under: Primary Hlth Care, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Strengthening Primary Health Care through Primary Care and Public Health Collaboration – McMaster University – October 2012

final report for CHSRF – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation

ISBN 978-1-927565-02-5 (print)
ISBN 978-927565-03-2 (pdf)

Extract from the Key Messages for Decision-Makers

“Interest in collaboration between primary care (PC) and public health (PH) and how it can improve the health of populations and quality and eff ectiveness of health care systems has grown substantially over the past four years.
• Evidence supports the benefi ts of collaboration between PC and PH in the following areas: maternalchild programs, communicable disease prevention and control, health promotion and health protection, chronic disease prevention and management, youth health, women’s health, and working with vulnerable populations.
• Collaboration between PC and PH increases accessibility to health promotion and illness prevention programs and services and decreases the cost of immunization programs through reduced wastage.”

… continues on the site

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Evidence-Informed Change Management in Canadian Healthcare Organizations – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) – 29 June 2012

Posted on August 28, 2012. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , |

Evidence-Informed Change Management in Canadian Healthcare Organizations – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation (CHSRF) – 29 June 2012

“Key Messages

  • Recent developments within the Canadian health sector highlight a perpetually shifting landscape, coupled with an increasing demand for practical approaches to implementing effective change.
  • The purpose of this project was to identify a suite of evidence-informed approaches to support change in small and large systems that are applicable to a variety of contexts within the Canadian health system.
  • Key issues that leaders and managers face in responding to and initiating change were used to identify evidence-informed approaches.
  • A variety of theories, models, approaches, tools, techniques and instruments that decision makers can effectively use to oversee change exist; these approaches need to be deliberately chosen, with attention to stage of change and context, so as to have maximum utility and impact.
  •  More attention to change readiness and change capacity prior to initiating change would contribute to better understanding about what strategies and approaches would help to initiate and support change effectively.
  • More formal learning regarding change in the four key areas of preparing for change, implementing change, spreading change, and sustaining change would be of benefit to decision makers.
  • Developers of university credit and non-credit professional development programs for leaders and managers should be encouraged to make the study of change a prominent feature in their curricula.
  • National and provincial agencies should be encouraged to develop a support platform devoted to leadership development in support of change in the Canadian health system (online access to tools and direct access to expertise).
  • While using approaches to change may be useful, increased attention to conceptualizing the change process would likely lead to more effective implementation and results.”
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Better Care: An Analysis of Nursing and Healthcare System Outcomes – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Posted on June 27, 2012. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Multidisciplinary Care | Tags: , , |

Better Care: An Analysis of Nursing and Healthcare System Outcomes – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Gina Browne, et al

“Key messages

Problems arise when circumstances in the world change and conventional wisdom does not.

The present federally funded Canadian healthcare system has been driven principally by insured physicians and hospitals providing acute and episodic care that is a poor match to the changing  demographics of persons with chronic disease living longer. The current health system consumes nearly one-half of provincial budgets.

There are solutions.

Recent analysis of 2005 expenditures by member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development on health and social services has empirically demonstrated that, after adjusting for overall gross domestic product per capita, it is the ratio of social service expenditures to health service expenditures that is better associated with improved outcomes in key health indicators and not the amount spent on health services.

Models of proactive, targeted nurse led care that focus on preventive patient self-management for people with chronic disease are either more effective and equally or less costly, or are equally effective and less costly than the usual model of care.

Additional key components of more effective and efficient healthcare models involve community based, nurse led models of care with an interdisciplinary team that includes the primary care physician. Such complex intervention requires specially trained or advanced practice nurses who supplement the care provided by physicians and other healthcare professionals. The proactive, comprehensive, coordinated model of community care is patient and family centered, targeted at community-dwelling individuals with complex chronic conditions and social circumstances.

Telemonitoring offers added effectiveness and efficiencies to healthcare, especially for remote populations.

The monitoring, evaluation and performance measurement system for the provision of healthcare should build on and link to pan-Canadian efforts already under way, such as the Longitudinal Health and Administrative Data Initiative.

Nurse-led models of care can be financed by costs averted from hospitals and emergency departments to home or community care. For example, after managing the current hospital caseload of patients awaiting alternative levels of care, the number of hospital beds could be reduced to free up funds for this reallocation of funding.

In Ontario alone, representing 37% of the Canadian population, independent reports estimate that millions of dollars could be saved in direct healthcare costs within one year by:

having nurses provide leading practices in home wound care
integrating nurse-led models of care to reduce high hospital readmissions by 10% for those with chronic conditions
providing 25% of palliative care in the home as opposed to in acute hospital settings
providing community care for patients in hospital designated as needing an alternative
providing proactive community care and patient self-management for those with congestive heart failure and other chronic conditions

Getting from problems to solutions is possible.”

… continues on the site

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Better Value: An analysis of the impact of current healthcare system funding and financing models and the value of health and healthcare in Canada – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Posted on June 27, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: , , , , |

Better Value: An analysis of the impact of current healthcare system funding and financing models and the value of health and healthcare in Canada – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Stuart N. Soroka

“Key Messages

Discussions of healthcare reform must acknowledge the following context: on the one hand, public opinion data suggest that Canadians are increasingly concerned about the future viability of public healthcare; on the other hand, Canadians remain highly supportive of universal healthcare in principle, and they remain largely pleased with their own interactions with the system.

There has been a striking increase in public spending on healthcare over the last 10-15 years. Specifically, controlling for inflation, per capita spending on healthcare in Canada was more than 50% higher in 2010 than in 1996.

This investment in healthcare has positive consequences where public assessments are concerned. Increased healthcare expenditures over the past decade appear to have made a difference: Canadians’ assessments of the current system have improved alongside increased expenditures.

Cross-provincial differences in the relationship between various measures of healthcare policy outcomes provide a valuable source of evidence on “value” in healthcare, and results confirm that value is not simply about spending more. For instance, the relationship between spending on physicians and the number of doctors per capita or wait times, or between hospital spending and the nursing workforce, clearly varies across provinces. In some cases increased spending appears to lead to better health policy outcomes; in other cases the relationship is much less clear.

The relationship between increased spending and improved public assessments also appears to vary across spending domains. Specifically, investments in hospitals, in drugs and in public health are more reliably linked to improved public assessments of the system, while spending in other healthcare domains is not clearly associated with improved public assessments.

Capturing “value” in healthcare is possible, then. But at present the required data – including data on key healthcare indicators and public attitudes on healthcare – are only intermittently available. A stronger commitment to monitor system outcomes should accompany a renewed investment in the Canadian healthcare system.”

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Better Health: An analysis of public policy and programming focusing on the determinants of health and health outcomes that are effective in achieving the healthiest populations – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Posted on June 27, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , , |

Better Health: An analysis of public policy and programming focusing on the determinants of health and health outcomes that are effective in achieving the healthiest populations – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Carles Muntaner, et al.

“Key Messages

Although major health inequalities exist in Canada, minimal action has been taken by municipal, provincial/territorial and federal levels of governments to narrow health inequalities through the social determinants of health (SDOH) and public policy.

Income, housing, food insecurity and social exclusion are four major social determinants in generating and reproducing health inequalities over the life course (childhood, adulthood and the elderly stage).

Low-income individuals and families have significantly higher rates of mortality, morbidity and healthcare use as compared with middle- and high-income groups. Health inequalities between the richest 20% and the poorest 20% have decreased from 1971 to 1996 in Canada; however, continued monitoring is needed given that income inequality has increased over the past decade.

Food insecurity and unstable housing are associated with poor health and, in turn, mediate the link between income and health (hunger and unstable housing affect health and result from low income). Mortality rates among homeless and marginally housed individuals were much higher than expected on the basis of low income alone.

Social exclusion is a powerful determinant of health inequalities; however, its effects are dependent upon which groups are compared. The health consequences of social exclusion are most unequal between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal groups. Immigrant health favours recent arrivals over long-term residents. Compared with non-minority ethnic groups, minority racial/ethnic groups are more likely to experience social and health disadvantages. However, no clear association exists for health inequalities between minority racial/ethnic groups.

Taking action on SDOH to narrow health inequalities offers new opportunities for the nursing profession to expand its role to include:

… continues on the site

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The Economic Impact of Improvements in Primary Healthcare Performance – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 22 May 2012

Posted on May 28, 2012. Filed under: Primary Hlth Care | Tags: |

The Economic Impact of Improvements in Primary Healthcare Performance – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 22 May 2012

Full report

Key Messages

“The performance of Canada’s primary healthcare (PHC) system lags behind that of other industrialized countries. Well-targeted investments in PHC can improve the health of individuals and populations, which can in turn have a positive impact on macro-economic indicators, such as employment rates, productivity and economic growth.
There are important gaps in Canadian PHC systems that require improvement. These include accessibility of PHC services, technical quality of care, quality improvement initiatives andpractice organization.
Various interventions and investments have been shown to enhance the performance of PHC, improve the quality of care and produce economic savings. These include incorporating pharmacists into PHC teams, case-management strategies to enhance chronic disease management, and electronic medical records that include patient recall and provider reminders for preventive care and chronic disease management.
This report presents the results of four different approaches to evaluate the economic impact of enhancements to PHC: 1. A synthesis of the literature on the macro- and micro-economic effects of good health, with specific relevance to PHC performance. 2. A systematic review of the economic impact of incorporating a pharmacist into a PHC practice. 3. A simulation exercise that evaluates the economic impact of improvements to influenza immunization rates for older adults brought about by provider reminder systems in PHC. 4. A literature review of reductions in burden of illness associated with four specific enhancements to chronic disease management in PHC that produce health benefits. These include PHC improvements that result in improved blood pressure control, enhanced diabetes management, increased uptake of cancer screening and improved continuity of care.”

… continues on the site

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Contexts and Models in Primary Healthcare and their Impact on Interprofessional Relationships – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – April 2012

Posted on May 21, 2012. Filed under: Primary Hlth Care | Tags: |

Contexts and Models in Primary Healthcare and their Impact on Interprofessional Relationships – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – April 2012

Cathie Scott, Laura Lagendyk

“This report examines Alberta’s experience in the development of Primary Care Networks (PCNs) over the period 2007 to 2011.”

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Clinical Nurse Specialists’ Role in Selecting & Using Knowledge to Improve Practice & Develop Practice-based Policies Designed to Promote Optimum Patient Outcomes – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 30 January 2012

Posted on February 14, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Nursing | Tags: |

Clinical Nurse Specialists’ Role in Selecting & Using Knowledge to Improve Practice & Develop Practice-based Policies Designed to Promote Optimum Patient Outcomes – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 30 January 2012

by Dr. Joanne Profetto-McGrath (Principal Investigator) and Dr. Anna Ehrenberg, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta and Susan Young and Wendy Hill, Capital Health Authority, Edmonton, Alberta

“Main Messages

Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNSs) are advanced practice nurses with expert knowledge and skills in a specific area of practice (Canadian Nurses Association, 2003). The role of the CNS in the field of evidence-based practice has largely been ignored, in spite of the fact that it is pivotal to the facilitation of research into practice in the clinical setting. The published literature is limited in terms of how CNSs access and transfer research knowledge in making clinical decisions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify and develop a preliminary understanding of the approaches utilized by CNSs to select and use research knowledge in their daily practice, with the long-term aim of developing concrete strategies for this group beyond obtaining and disseminating evidence.”

… continues on the site

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The Fiscal Sustainability of Canadian Publicly Funded Healthcare Systems and the Policy Response to the Fiscal Gap – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 30 January 2012

Posted on February 14, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: |

The Fiscal Sustainability of Canadian Publicly Funded Healthcare Systems and the Policy Response to the Fiscal Gap – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 30 January 2012

by Livio Di Matteo and Rosanna Di Matteo, Lakehead University

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The Use of Health Technology Assessment to Inform the Value of Provider Fees: Current Challenges and Future Oportunities – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 October 2011

Posted on November 1, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Technology Assessment | Tags: |

The Use of Health Technology Assessment to Inform the Value of Provider Fees: Current Challenges and Future Oportunities – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 October 2011

Don Husereau, Chris G. Cameron

“Health technology assessment (HTA) is becoming an increasingly prominent policy tool in response to concerns about rising healthcare costs driven by the use of technology. HTA is a multi-disciplinary process of policy analysis that aims to bridge the world of research with the world of decision-making by examining the medical, economic, social and ethical implications of the use of a health technology and their associated interventions. HTA seeks to define and measure (i.e., capture) the value of new products and services. It is currently being used in Canadian hospitals to decide what technologies to adopt and by some health jurisdictions to decide whether to create new provider fee codes. However, decisions to adopt a new technology are also driven by the need to provide consumer choice, provider autonomy, and patient access, underlying the principles of Canada’s Health Act. Additionally, not funding a new technology may provide disincentives to service providers to practice in health systems where services are not reimbursed, threatening the ability of the health system to reliably provide care and leading to additional costs if specialty services are not available. This, in turn, may harm the relationship between payers and providers.

In Canada, new codes for provider fees are developed in each jurisdiction using separate approaches and with very little coordination. This makes the Canadian health system susceptible to perceived inequities across jurisdictions and can lead to the phenomenon known as “whipsawing”—pressure to fund a service in other jurisdictions if only one province or territory is funding the service. There may also be pressure to pay the same amount of money for similar services without considering the social and economic context in which it will be delivered. This can result in unnecessary growth in health system costs.

The prices of new provider fees in Canada are largely based on costs to deliver the service and do not consider the relative value-for-money of the new service. This approach means providers have little incentive to perform high-value services compared to low-value services. HTA can play an important role in linking the price of a provider fee with a tangible value. This means that service prices can be modified upward for high-value services and downward for low-value services, averting unnecessary growth in health system costs.” 

… continues on the site

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The Sources of Attitudes on the Canadian Healthcare System – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – September 2011

Posted on October 17, 2011. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , |

The Sources of Attitudes on the Canadian Healthcare System – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – September 2011
ISBN: 978-1-927024-17-1

“Understanding the sources of Canadians’ attitudes toward healthcare is a critical step in making public opinion useful for healthcare policy-makers. This report examines three sources of opinion concerning the healthcare system: demographic characteristics, mass media and direct experiences with the health system.”

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A Comparative Study of Three Transformative Healthcare Systems: Lessons for Canada – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 28 August 2011

Posted on August 30, 2011. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: |

A Comparative Study of Three Transformative Healthcare Systems: Lessons for Canada – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 28 August 2011

“This synthesis examines three high performing healthcare systems and identified the key themes that are relevant to Canadian Jurisdictions. The authors identify how these themes can be applied in the Canadian context and suggest steps forward.”

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Leadership Accountability in Canadian Healthcare: Creating the momentum to improve quality – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 29 August 2011

Posted on August 30, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Leadership | Tags: |

Leadership Accountability in Canadian Healthcare: Creating the momentum to improve quality – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 29 August 2011

Report on the Fifth Annual CEO Forum

“The theme of the 2011 CEO Forum, Leadership Accountability in Canadian Healthcare: Creating the momentum to improve quality, grew from a clear message heard at the 2010 forum: Canada must create a culture of excellence in healthcare. We wanted to use this year’s meeting to discuss how to create an atmosphere that encourages quality improvement, and to share practical strategies to create a high-performing, integrated healthcare system. We also wanted to talk about the infrastructure needed to support innovation and quality improvement; how to align accountability at different levels, and how to measure performance to improve outcomes and reduce inefficiency. The afternoon sessions explored strategies for getting better value for money in healthcare—variation research, integrated care models and disinvestments strategies. These strategies are described briefly in the “Breakout Discussion” boxes in this report.”  … continues on the site

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Assessing initiatives to transform healthcare systems: Lessons for the Canadian healthcare system

Posted on August 30, 2011. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: |

Assessing initiatives to transform healthcare systems: Lessons for the Canadian healthcare system  – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 21 July 2011

“Canada has invested significant financial resources and energy (including numerous federal and provincial commissions) in efforts to make the healthcare system more responsive to evolving needs. Nonetheless, there is general consensus that Canada’s healthcare systems have been too slow to adapt. A 2008 report by the Health Council of Canada concludes that since the 2003 Health Accord there have been improvements in access to care in some clinical priority areas, such as hip and knee replacement and cataract surgery. However, it also identifies a number of areas where “progress on the accord commitments is not a cause for celebration” (HCC, 2008:34). These areas include drug coverage and safe and appropriate prescribing; home care; aboriginal health; primary healthcare; the healthcare workforce; electronic health records and information technology; and accountability.

This paper suggests avenues that governments can take to support the transformation of the healthcare system to provide better care and services.”

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Adopting a Common Nursing Practice Model Across a Recently Merged Multi-Site Hospital – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 2011

Posted on August 30, 2011. Filed under: Nursing | Tags: |

Adopting a Common Nursing Practice Model Across a Recently Merged Multi-Site Hospital – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 2011

Extract from the executive summary.

Background

Many health care organizations have recently undergone extensive reorganization and administrative change. Combined with the additional stresses of ongoing budget restraints, increasing patient acuity and shortages in nursing staff, it is likely that these organizations will continue to experience even more change in the future. With nursing care serving as the cornerstone of most patients’ hospital experience, this study examined the multi-faceted impact of introducing a new model of nursing care on several key outcomes related to patients, nurses and health care organizations.

The study was a multi-faceted evaluation of the impact of introducing a new standardized model of nursing clinical practice at three sites of a previously merged tertiary care hospital. Each former hospital site within the merged structure had previously been using either one predominant nursing model of care throughout the hospital or a mixture of models within different sub-components of the hospital, creating a situation whereby a multitude of approaches to nursing care existed across the newly merged hospital. A local committee, the Model of Nursing Care Work Group, composed of multidisciplinary staff from The Ottawa Hospital, developed a new clinical practice model using resources and personnel from within their own organization, thereby ensuring a high degree of applicability and appropriateness across the sites. The new model has a strong emphasis on “direct” nursing care and uses a set of guiding principles to emphasize continuity of care for patients as well as the provision of clinical experts for nursing staff. Our project provided The Ottawa Hospital with the independent resources and expertise required to complete such an evaluation, in order to contribute important knowledge to the evidence base on the effects of changes to patient care delivery within the health care system.

… continues

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Better with Age: Health systems planning for the aging population – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – July 2011

Posted on August 5, 2011. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: |

Better with Age: Health systems planning for the aging population – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – July 2011
Full text
“This new report from CHSRF, Better with Age: Health systems planning for the aging population, is a synthesis of what we heard from more than 200 policy-makers, healthcare executives, researchers and citizen representatives during six roundtables across the country. The main message? Now is the time to formulate policies and implement sustainable reforms that will improve healthcare for the growing number of older Canadians—and the population as a whole.”

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Effective Strategies for Interactive Public Engagement in the Development of Healthcare Policies and Programs – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 9 March 2011

Posted on March 16, 2011. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: |

Effective Strategies for Interactive Public Engagement in the Development of Healthcare Policies and Programs – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 9 March 2011
Julia Abelson, PhD

“Summary

Identifying effective strategies for involving the public in healthcare issues is a priority for Canadian health system managers and policy-makers. This synthesis aims to answer an overarching question: What is known about the effectiveness of interactive strategies for engaging the public in the development of healthcare policies and programs?

This report was prepared for and funded by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation and the New Brunswick Health Research Foundation. As such, attention was paid to aspects of the New Brunswick context relevant to public engagement design, with specific emphasis on interactive public engagement – that is, informed discussion among citizens designed to contribute to decision-making.{”  …continues

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Pass it on: Patients as Part of the Healthcare Team – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation

Posted on June 15, 2010. Filed under: Patient Participation | Tags: |

Pass it on:  Patients as Part of the Healthcare Team – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation

“rom giving children a voice in their care to providing peer support for mental health patients, these articles tell the stories of four organizations that are successfully including patients and their families in the provision of healthcare.”

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CSSS Territories: A Framework for Actions to Improve Population Health – Canada – February 2010

Posted on March 9, 2010. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

CSSS Territories: A Framework for Actions to Improve Population Health – Canada – February 2010
Infoletter: the evolution of health-system management and evaluation practices – v.7 no. 1 February 2010

“Since 2004, Quebec’s Centres de santé et de services sociaux (CSSSs) [health and social services centres] have officially been responsible for protecting and improving the health and well-being of the population in their territory. This responsibility entails unique management and governance challenges that arise, in particular, out of the requirement that organizations operate and resources be deployed as part of territory-based networks. In the context of health-care system governance, this concept of territory also provides an opportunity to rethink actions targeted at improving population health. Indeed, when methods to enhance population health are implemented, the importance of both local-level actions and territorial organization increase.

In this context, what is the innovative potential of the concept of territory in health care? What changes are sparked, or should be introduced,  in governance and management practices to benefit from the decision to territorialize actions? This issue of Infolettre presents three articles that address these questions.”

… continues

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Effective Governance for Quality and Patient Safety in Canadian Healthcare Organizations – January 2010

Posted on February 18, 2010. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality | Tags: |

Effective Governance for Quality and Patient Safety in Canadian Healthcare Organizations – January 2010
G. Ross Baker, Jean-Louis Denis, Marie-Pascale Pomey, Anu Macintosh-Murray

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Primary Healthcare: Improving Canada’s primary healthcare: benefits and opportunities – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – January 2010

Posted on January 27, 2010. Filed under: General Practice, Primary Hlth Care | Tags: |

Primary Healthcare: Improving Canada’s primary healthcare: benefits and opportunities – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation

“About the reports

These three reports summarize the current state of primary healthcare in Canada, investigate best international practices and provide concrete recommendations on how Canada can redefine its priorities in order to strengthen the system.

Commissioned by CHSRF and the Canadian Working Group for Primary Healthcare Improvement, the three reports will be used to guide activities in developing a pan-Canadian strategy for using evidence to improve the design and delivery of primary healthcare.

The Canadian Working Group for Primary Healthcare Improvement was formed at an April 2008 meeting of leaders in primary healthcare (researchers, practitioners, funders and policy makers) that was convened by CHSRF – the group’s lead agency.

The reports

What are the Critical Attributes and Benefits of a High-quality Primary Healthcare System?
Dale McMurchy
January 2009 (released January 2010)

This paper summarizes the key attributes and benefits of high-quality primary healthcare systems. It covers factors such as orientation and design, organization and process, effective governance, physician supply and the critical features unique to primary care delivery.

The Health and Economic Consequences of Achieving a High-quality Primary Healthcare System in Canada – “Applying What Works in Canada: Closing the Gap”
Alan Katz, Richard H. Glazier, Janani Vijayaraghavan
February 2009 (released January 2010)

Currently, there is a large gap between the ideal primary healthcare system – one that relies on evidence-based practice – and the reality of Canada’s system. This report analyzes the effects, both health-related and economic, of moving the reality toward the ideal.

A Structure for Co-ordinating Canadian Primary Healthcare Research
G. Russell, S. Johnston, P. Thille, R. Geneau, J. Conklin, W. Hogg, Y. Ikezawa
February 2009 (released January 2010)

If Canada wants a high-quality primary healthcare system that integrates emerging evidence into practice and policy, then it needs a co-ordinating body to support all those working to improve primary healthcare through evidence. The authors investigate international and domestic models, examine various frameworks and processes, compare the pros and cons, and explore the feasibility of implementing a network model in the Canadian context.”

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