Exploring Accountable Care in Canada: Integrating Financial and Quality Incentives for Physicians and Hospitals – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 1 April 2014

Posted on April 23, 2014. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: |

Exploring Accountable Care in Canada: Integrating Financial and Quality Incentives for Physicians and Hospitals – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 1 April 2014

“ACOs are promising vehicles for aligning physician and hospital interests in improving quality and reducing cost. However, successful implementation and realization of the ACO mission requires that attention be paid to supporting capacity building within the ACOs, development of a culture of learning and improvement, as well as rigorous monitoring and evaluation. While the jury is still out on success of ACO implementation efforts in the United States, the results presented here suggest that further exploration of their potential in Canada is warranted, and that distinct characteristics of the Canadian system might require a slightly different approach.”

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Exploring Accountable Care in Canada: Integrating Financial and Quality Incentives for Physicians and Hospitals – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 1 April 2014 )

Reassessing existing funded health services and products to support appropriate care – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 29 November 2013

Posted on December 4, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Policy, Health Systems Improvement | Tags: |

Reassessing existing funded health services and products to support appropriate care – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 29 November 2013

“In Ontario, new healthcare services and technologies coming into the system must undergo a rigorous evidence-based assessment. But what about existing services and technologies that are already in use? Which of those should be subjected to new evidence-based analyses to determine if they add value and are appropriate? Without a framework to identify priorities for reassessment from the thousands of existing funded services and products, the prospect of determining which services to scale back, focus or discontinue would be problematic at best.”

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Reassessing existing funded health services and products to support appropriate care – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 29 November 2013 )

Making the Case for Change: Advancing the NWT Chronic Disease Management Strategy – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 26 September 2013

Posted on October 1, 2013. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt | Tags: |

Making the Case for Change: Advancing the NWT Chronic Disease Management Strategy – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 26 September 2013

NWT = Northwest Territories – has one of the highest burden of diseases in Canada

Media release: NWT chronic disease management collaboration results in better care, roadmap for system change – 26 September 2013

“A new report released by the Northwest Territories Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) in partnership with the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) provides a detailed strategy for reducing the rate and impact of chronic disease in the region. It highlights the successes, challenges and lessons learned through three improvement projects focused on renal disease, mental health and diabetes.”

… continues

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Making the Case for Change: Advancing the NWT Chronic Disease Management Strategy – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 26 September 2013 )

Safety at Home: A Pan Canadian Home Care Study – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 26 June 2013

Posted on September 4, 2013. Filed under: Patient Safety | Tags: , , , |

Safety at Home: A Pan Canadian Home Care Study – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 26 June 2013

“One out of every six seniors receives home care services in Canada. As the aging population continues to grow there is a greater need to ensure the delivery of Home Care in Canada is safe.

The release today of The Safety at Home: A Pan Canadian Home Care Study is the first of its kind that examines adverse events in the home and includes recommendations on how to make care safer.

The Canadian Patient Safety Institute (CPSI) partnered with other sponsoring organizations for the study including, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Institutes of Health Services and Policy Research (IHSPR), The Change Foundation, and the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI). The study examined the reasons for harmful incidents, determined the impact on families and clients and made suggestions on how to make home care safer.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Safety at Home: A Pan Canadian Home Care Study – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 26 June 2013 )

Leading the Way to Healthcare Improvement in Quebec: Three CFHI-Funded Healthcare Transformation and Coordination Approaches Realize Results – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 14 March 2013

Posted on March 26, 2013. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality | Tags: , , |

Leading the Way to Healthcare Improvement in Quebec: Three CFHI-Funded Healthcare Transformation and Coordination Approaches Realize Results – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 14 March 2013

“Three Quebec-led teams are accelerating the transformation of healthcare and seeing positive change, as a result of having applied innovative project and change-management processes to the healthcare challenges in their regions.

The findings are revealed in three reports funded by the Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement (CFHI) released today. They include:

Strategic Community (SC): An Approach for Developing Interorganizational Collaboration by the members of the Work Organization Studies Chair, Université de Sherbrooke, led by Dr. Mario Roy and Madeleine Audet

Innovative Strategy in Organizational Transformation: Creating and Implementing a Transition Support Office within a University Health Centre led by Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay, Associate Professor, Ingram School of Nursing, McGill University and Marie Claire Richer, Director Transition Support Office (TSO)
In 2008, the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) set up the Transition Support Office (TSO) to guide the implementation of its large scale redevelopment project which is still underway. Once complete in 2015, the care and services now provided at six hospital sites will be absorbed into three. More than 10,000 staff and thousands of clients will be impacted by the redevelopment. The TSO’s goal is to ensure consistency around the harmonization of clinical practices, team consolidation and process optimization.

Knowledge in Action: Healthcare Management and Governance Innovation Lab, led by Dr. Denis A. Roy, Vice-president of Scientific Affairs, National Institute of Public Health, Quebec”

… continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Leading the Way to Healthcare Improvement in Quebec: Three CFHI-Funded Healthcare Transformation and Coordination Approaches Realize Results – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – 14 March 2013 )

Reviewing the Potential Roles of Financial Incentives for Funding Healthcare in Canada – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – December 2012

Posted on February 26, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics | Tags: , |

Reviewing the Potential Roles of Financial Incentives for Funding Healthcare in Canada – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – December 2012

ISBN 978-1-927024-65-2
Jason M. Sutherland, Nadya Repin, R. Trafford Crump

“Key Messages

Healthcare costs have been consistently rising, now constituting around 40 percent of provincial GDPs, and threaten to overwhelm the ability of provinces to fund the breadth of healthcare needs of their residents. The ways in which Canadian provinces fund healthcare is an important issue facing policymakers since ineffective, inefficient and unsafe care is a waste of taxpayers’ money and potentially harms patients.
Currently, most provinces fund healthcare through a ‘global budget,’ where a fixed amount of funding is distributed to a provider (e.g. a hospital or a health authority) to pay for all insured healthcare services for a fixed period of time. The key benefit of global budgets is that they provide a method to control expenditures. Hospitals account for the largest piece of these expenditures, at about 28 percent of total healthcare costs.
Compared to international norms, Canada is unusual in its extensive use of global budgets to fund healthcare. Most countries fund healthcare based on the type and amount of services provided, known as activity-based funding (ABF).
Funding healthcare providers based on the type and amount of services provided increases transparency in the healthcare system and creates financial incentives for increasing access. However, with more services provided, there is a commensurate increase in healthcare expenditures.
Many countries have been able to use the financial incentives of ABF to improve access to care while effectively minimizing the downside risks to quality and safety.
With clearly articulated policy objectives, provinces are in a position to learn from other countries’ experiences in healthcare funding reforms, adapt effective strategies and avoid risks to quality and access.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Reviewing the Potential Roles of Financial Incentives for Funding Healthcare in Canada – Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement – December 2012 )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...