Age-specific housing and care for low to moderate income older people – Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute – 2011

Posted on September 22, 2011. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: , |

Age-specific housing and care for low to moderate income older people – Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute – 2011

Bridge, C. et al. (2011) Age-specific housing and care for low to moderate income older people, AHURI Final Report No.174. Melbourne: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.

“Aims and questions

This report presents the final findings of a national, interdisciplinary research project into age-specific housing for lower-income older Australians. The key research aim addressed in this report is to assess Australia’s current age-specific housing market and its potential growth among low to moderate income older people, in order to develop effective policy strategies for the provision of age-specific housing for this disadvantaged group.

This project examines the increasing demand for age-appropriate and affordable housing that can adequately encompass the care needs of older people with low to moderate incomes, the housing types and options currently available to lower-income older people, and future trends and policy strategies that may emerge in answer to this demand.”

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Age-specific housing for low to moderate-income older people – Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) – 6 August 2010

Posted on September 14, 2010. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: |

Age-specific housing for low to moderate-income older people – Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) – 6 August 2010

Laura Davy, and others Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI)

August 2010
AHURI Positioning Paper No. 134
ISSN: 1834-9250 ISBN: 978-1-921610-48-6

“Description
This research project seeks to better understand the nature of the age-specific housing market in Australia and what drives or does not encourage older people to seek age specific accommodation.

Our research approach is framed by aims as follows: to acquire knowledge and understanding of the nature of the age-specific housing market in Australia; how providers perceive the age-specific housing market and what they view as incentives and disincentives to invest therein and how older people perceive age specific housing; and what drives or does not encourage older people to seek age specific accommodation. Our multi-method research design involves a literature review, a survey questionnaire and in-depth semi-structured interviews of residents, providers and key national and State policy players. The interviews and survey data will provide detailed information requiring the needs and expectations of low-moderate income older persons and the age specific housing market. A public forum will be organised in each of the three states to present and discuss the findings to representatives of industry, age specific peak bodies and policymakers. These discussions will feed into our policy recommendations.

In order to ensure the expertise and breadth of knowledge needed to undertake this research, this will be a collaborative project undertaken between the UNSW/UWS and WA AHURI Centres. A major strength of the team is its interdisciplinary nature with social science, architectural, health and economics knowledge expertise. Additionally the team draws on and will extend skill sets for two less experienced and emerging housing researchers in two different states.”

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Housing needs of asset-poor older Australians & Housing, support and care for older Australians

Posted on August 24, 2010. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics | Tags: |

Two from the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.

Housing needs of asset-poor older Australians: other countries’ policy initiatives and their implications for Australia

authored by Gavin Wood, Val Colic-Peisker, Rachel Ong, Naomi Bailey and Mike Berry for the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute August 2010

This Positioning Paper is the first output of a project that explores the housing options and actual housing circumstances of asset-poor older Australians. The overall aim of the project is to provide evidence to Australian policy makers confronted with the issue of asset-poor older Australians who may not be able to spend their retirement years as appropriately and securely housed self-funded retirees.

Housing, support and care for older Australians: the role of service integrated housing

Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) Research and Policy Bulletin – August 2010

Forms of service integrated housing- such as retirement villages – have been developed by the community and private sectors to provide housing, support and care for older people in Australia. Is there a need for a more hands-on role for government in directing, shaping and expanding service integrated housing?

•    Service integrated housing (SIH) is a new term developed in this research to cover all forms of housing for people in later life where the housing provider deliberately makes available or arranges for one or more types of support and care services to be delivered in conjunction with the housing provision.

•    SIH is identified as a third component of aged care in Australia, intermediate between community care and residential care, and overlapping with both these components.

•    Retirement villages are the main form of SIH in Australia. At the 2006 Census, some 130 000 older Australians lived in retirement villages, and when other forms of SIH are added, the scale of SIH is comparable to residential aged care (with 167 000 residents as of 2006).

• SIH is becoming more diverse with the development of assisted living apartments and innovative approaches to integrating services with housing for older people at risk of homelessness or insecurely housed.

•    Development of SIH over the last 25 years has been shaped largely by providers’ decisions in response to consumer demand, with only limited direct influence from government policy.

• Current initiatives to expand the supply of affordable housing in Australia, such as the National Affordable Rental Scheme, present opportunities for increasing access to SIH for lower income, low wealth older renters and others whose needs are not well met through general programs.

Authors: Professor Andrew Jones, Dr Anna Howe, Associate Professor Cheryl Tilse, Professor Helen Bartlett and Professor Robert Stimson, AHURI Queensland Research Centre

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