Accountability in the NHS: Implications of the government’s reform programme – The King’s Fund – 1 June 2011

Posted on June 3, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Health Mgmt Policy Planning | Tags: , |

Accountability in the NHS: Implications of the government’s reform programme – The King’s Fund – 1 June 2011

64 pages ISBN: 978 1 85717 617 9

“Summary

The government’s health reforms propose radical changes to the structures and processes within the National Health Service (NHS) in England that have provoked unprecedented debate, protest and opposition. One of the core issues is how providers and commissioners of care will be held to account in the future if many of the existing lines of accountability are removed, and there are deep concerns about whether the proposed substitutes are adequate for the task.

The reforms could significantly reduce the day-to-day involvement of politicians, civil servants and managers in health care. Localisation, GP empowerment and patient choices will be the new priorities.

Accountability in the NHS: Implications of the government’s health reform programme seeks to inform the debate around the nature of accountability relationships in the NHS and how these will change under the reforms. The authors identify five types of accountability most relevant to health care – by scrutiny, management, regulation, contract and election.”

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For the Public’s Health: The Role of Measurement in Action and Accountability – Institute of Medicine Consensus Report – 8 December 2010

Posted on February 23, 2011. Filed under: Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , , , |

For the Public’s Health: The Role of Measurement in Action and Accountability – Institute of Medicine Consensus Report – 8 December 2010

“Despite having the costliest medical care delivery system in the world, Americans are not particularly healthy. Recent international comparisons show that life expectancy in the U.S. ranks 49th among all nations, and infant mortality rates are higher in the U.S. than in many far less affluent nations. While these statistics are alarming, the bigger problem is that we do not know how to reverse this trend. Our lack of knowledge is due in large part to significant inadequacies in the system for gathering, analyzing, and communicating health information about the population.

To inform the public health community and all other sectors that contribute to population health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation commissioned the IOM to examine three major topics that influence the health of the public—measurement, laws, and funding. In this, the first of three reports, the IOM reviews current approaches for measuring the health of individuals and communities and suggests changes in the processes, tools, and approaches used to gather information about health outcomes and their determinants. The IOM recommends developing an integrated and coordinated system in which all parties—including governmental and private sector partners at all levels—have access to timely and meaningful data to help foster individual and community awareness and action.”

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