Violence

Violence in England and Wales in 2013: an Accident and Emergency perspective – Cardiff University – 23 April 2014

Posted on April 24, 2014. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Violence |

Violence in England and Wales in 2013: an Accident and Emergency perspective – Cardiff University – 23 April 2014

News release: Serious violence in England and Wales drops 12% in 2013

“Numbers of people injured in serious violence dropped by 12% in 2013 compared to 2012, according to an England and Wales study by Cardiff University.

Overall, an estimated 234,509 people attended Emergency Departments (EDs), Minor Injury Units (MIUs) and Walk-in Centres in England and Wales for treatment following violence in 2013 – 32,780 fewer than in 2012.

The data was gathered from a scientific sample of 117 EDs, MIUs and Walk-in Centres in England and Wales. All are certified members of the National Violence Surveillance Network (NVSN).

Lead author of the study and Director of the Violence and Society Research Group at Cardiff University, Professor Jonathan Shepherd said: “The data show another significant year on year fall in serious violence across England and Wales. Apart from a 7% increase in 2008, levels of serious violence have fallen every year since 2001.

“Violence is falling in many Western countries and we don’t know all the reasons why,” said Professor Shepherd. “In England and Wales, the growth of multi-agency violence prevention involving police, the NHS and local authorities may well be a factor; violence has fallen more in regions where this is best organised. Another probable explanation is changes in alcohol habits. Binge drinking has become less frequent, and the proportion of youth who don’t drink alcohol at all has risen sharply. Also, after decades in which alcohol has become more affordable, since 2008 it has become less affordable. For people most prone to involvement in violence, those aged 18-30, falls in disposable income are probably an important factor.”

… continues on the site

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Helping health and care services manage difficult patient behaviour – Department of Health, England – 3 April 2014

Posted on April 15, 2014. Filed under: Mental Health Psychi Psychol, Violence |

Helping health and care services manage difficult patient behaviour – Department of Health, England – 3 April 2014

“There are a range of different approaches that limit an individual’s movement, liberty and/or freedom to act independently. These are called restrictive interventions.

This document provides guidance for adult health and social care staff to develop a culture where restrictive interventions are only ever used as a last resort.

The report identifies actions that will improve people’s quality of life which should then reduce the need for restrictive interventions. It sets out ways to know who is responsible for making these improvements, including effective governance, transparency and monitoring.

The guidance is for commissioners of services, executive directors, frontline staff and all those who care for and support people.”

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Domestic violence and abuse – how services can respond effectively (PH50) – NICE guidance – February 2014

Posted on February 28, 2014. Filed under: Violence |

Domestic violence and abuse – how services can respond effectively (PH50) – NICE guidance – February 2014

“Domestic violence and abuse is a complex issue that needs sensitive handling by a range of health and social care professionals. The cost, in both human and economic terms, is so significant that even marginally effective interventions are cost effective.

Women and men can experience this type of violence in heterosexual and same-sex relationships.

The recommendations cover the broad spectrum of domestic violence and abuse, including violence perpetrated on men, on those in same-sex relationships and on young people.

Working in a multi-agency partnership is the most effective way to approach the issue at both an operational and strategic level. Initial and ongoing training and organisational support is also needed.

The guidance is for health and social care commissioners, specialist domestic violence and abuse staff and others whose work may bring them into contact with people who experience or perpetrate domestic violence and abuse. In addition it may be of interest to members of the public.”

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Reducing violence and aggression in A&E: Through a better experience – report by Frontier Economics for the Design Council – November 2013

Posted on December 17, 2013. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Hosp Design Planning Architecture, Violence |

Reducing violence and aggression in A&E: Through a better experience – report by Frontier Economics for the Design Council – November 2013

A&E departments urged to implement proven design solutions that improve patient experience and save money – Design Council [UK] – 28 November 2013

“Today, Design Council and Frontier Economics published evidence that Accident & Emergency departments could improve patient experience, increase staff wellbeing and save money by implementing a new, proven design solution created by studio PearsonLloyd. Based on this evidence, Design Council recommends that other Trusts adopt the designs.

The two-pronged solution called ‘A Better A&E’ incorporates a ‘Guidance Solution’ – signage to guide and reassure patients, and a ‘People Solution’ – a programme to support staff in their interactions with frustrated, aggressive and sometimes violent patients through communications training and reflective practices.

The solutions have been implemented at two pilot Trusts – St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust in London and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHS). The implementation has been rigorously evaluated over the last year. Key findings show:”

… continues on the site

A Better A&E

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Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2013

Posted on October 22, 2013. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Violence | Tags: , |

Elder Abuse and Its Prevention: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2013

ISBN 978-0-309-29351-8

“Description

Elder Abuse and Its Prevention is the summary of a workshop convened in April 2013 by the Institute of Medicine’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention. Using an ecological framework, this workshop explored the burden of elder abuse around the world, focusing on its impacts on individuals, families, communities, and societies. Additionally, the workshop addressed occurrences and co-occurrences of different types of abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, and financial, as well as neglect. The ultimate objective was to illuminate promising global and multisectoral evidence-based approaches to the prevention of elder maltreatment. While the workshop covered scope and prevalence and unique characteristics of abuse, the intention was to move beyond what is known about elder abuse to foster discussions about how to improve prevention, intervention, and mitigation of the victims’ needs, particularly through collaborative efforts. The workshop discussions included innovative intervention models and opportunities for prevention across sectors and settings.

Violence and related forms of abuse against elders is a global public health and human rights problem with far-reaching consequences, resulting in increased death, disability, and exploitation with collateral effects on well-being. Data suggest that at least 10 percent of elders in the United States are victims of elder maltreatment every year. In low- and middle-income countries, where the burden of violence is the greatest, the figure is likely even higher. In addition, elders experiencing risk factors such as diminishing cognitive function, caregiver dependence, and social isolation are more vulnerable to maltreatment and underreporting. As the world population of adults aged 65 and older continues to grow, the implications of elder maltreatment for health care, social welfare, justice, and financial systems are great. However, despite the magnitude of global elder maltreatment, it has been an underappreciated public health problem. Elder Abuse and Its Prevention discusses the prevalence and characteristics of elder abuse around the world, risk factors for abuse and potential adverse health outcomes, and contextually specific factors, such as culture and the role of the community.”

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Hospital Responsiveness to Family Violence: 96-month evaluation – NZ Ministry of Health – 12 March 2013

Posted on March 14, 2013. Filed under: Violence |

Hospital Responsiveness to Family Violence: 96-month evaluation – NZ Ministry of Health – 12 March 2013

“The VIP evaluation tests systems of all 27 New Zealand public hospitals on their capability to respond to family violence, as part of implementing the Ministry of Health-funded Violence Intervention Programme (VIP).

VIP aims to raise health system awareness and capability to identify, assess and refer people experiencing partner abuse and child abuse and neglect as part of routine health care practice.”

ISSN 2230-6366 (print), ISSN 2230-6370 (online)

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Contagion of Violence – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 3 October 2012

Posted on October 4, 2012. Filed under: Violence | Tags: |

Contagion of Violence – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 3 October 2012

Full text

“In the past 25 years, there has been a shift in the field of violence prevention, from the assumption that violence is inevitable to the recognition that violence is preventable. In exploring the occurrence of violence, researchers have recognized the tendency for violent acts to cluster, to spread from place to place, and to mutate from one type to another – similar to the infectious disease model, in which an agent or vector initiates a specific biological pathway leading to symptoms of disease and infectivity.

On April 30 – May 1, 2012, the IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention held a workshop to explore the contagious nature of violence. The workshop focused on the epidemiology of the contagion, possible processes and mechanisms by which violence is transmitted, how contextual factors mitigate or exacerbate the issue, and ways in which the contagion of violence might be interrupted. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Gender and health – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2012

Posted on August 2, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Violence | Tags: , |

Gender and health – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2012

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Communications and Technology for Violence Prevention – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 13 June 2012

Posted on June 18, 2012. Filed under: Violence | Tags: |

Communications and Technology for Violence Prevention – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 13 June 2012

full text

“In the last 25 years, a major shift has occurred in the field of violence prevention, from the assumption that violence is inevitable to the realization that violence is preventable. As we learn more about what works to reduce violence, the challenge facing those who work in the field is how to use all of this new information to rapidly deploy or enhance new programs. At the same time, new communications technologies and distribution channels have altered traditional means of communications, and have made community-based efforts to prevent violence possible by making information readily available. How can these new technologies be successfully applied to the field of violence prevention?

On December 8-9, 2011, the IOM’s Forum on Global Violence Prevention held a workshop to explore the intersection of violence prevention and information and communications technology. The workshop – called “mPreventViolence” – provided an opportunity for practitioners to engage in new and innovative thinking concerning these two fields with the goal of bridging gaps in language, processes, and mechanisms. The workshop focused on exploring the potential applications of technology to violence prevention, drawing on experience in development, health, and the social sector as well as from industry and the private sector. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Responding to Domestic Abuse: Guidance for General Practices – Royal College of General Practitioners – 24 May 2012

Posted on May 28, 2012. Filed under: Violence | Tags: |

Responding to Domestic Abuse: Guidance for General Practices – Royal College of General Practitioners – 24 May 2012

“Responding to Domestic Abuse: Guidance for General Practices, is produced in collaboration with national charity Co-ordinated Action Against Domestic Abuse (CAADA), the Identification & Referral to Improve Safety (IRIS) programme and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and was funded by the Department of Health.”

… continues on the site

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‘Striking the Balance’: Practical Guidance on the application of Caldicott Guardian Principles to Domestic Violence and MARACs (Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conferences) – 16 April 2012

Posted on April 18, 2012. Filed under: Violence | Tags: , |

‘Striking the Balance’: Practical Guidance on the application of Caldicott Guardian Principles to Domestic Violence and MARACs (Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conferences) – 16 April 2012

Christopher Fincken, UK Council of Caldicott Guardians

“This guidance is intended to assist those involved in information sharing between agencies about Domestic Violene to make decisions. It identifies the underlying ethical considerations so that tensions between confidentiality and information sharing may be resolved.”

Extract

“Domestic Violence and abuse is a large scale national problem. This guidance is intended to assist those involved in information sharing between agencies about Domestic Violence to make decisions. In particular Caldicott Guardians and those responsible for making decisions about the appropriateness of sharing information (including sensitive health information) about individuals involved in domestic violence. It identifies the underlying ethical considerations so that tensions between confidentiality and information sharing may be resolved.

A MARAC (Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference) is a local, multi agency victim-focused meeting where information is shared on the highest risk cases of domestic abuse between different agencies including: police, criminal justice, health, child protection, housing, IDVAs (Independent Domestic Violence Advisers) as well as other specialists from the statutory and voluntary sectors. A safety plan for each victim is then created. Within the MARAC it is important that trust is fostered. If a particular agency is not seen as trustworthy, others will feel they should not share information. In particular the development of trusting relationships between health, social services and the police are absolutely crucial to the effectiveness of the MARAC.

The legislative and ethical considerations are often complex and Caldicott Guardians in their role as Gatekeepers to individuals’ records may need guidance as to the application of Caldicott principles in relation to making judgements and authorising information sharing about domestic violence.

It should be clear to all those staff involved:
• What information they CAN share and under what circumstances.
• What information they CANNOT share and under what circumstances.
• What they should do if they are NOT SURE or are challenged, who they can ask for advice and how and to whom the matter should be escalated.

Caldicott Principles”

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RCN lone worker survey 2011 – 5 January 2012

Posted on January 9, 2012. Filed under: Nursing, Violence, Workforce | Tags: |

RCN lone worker survey 2011 – 5 January 2012

“The Royal College of Nursing has said that assaults on nursing staff are completely unacceptable, as new survey findings show that over 60 per cent of nurses working in the community have been subjected to abuse in the past two years.”

… continues on the site

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Building Partnerships, Staying Safe -The health sector contribution to HM Government’s Prevent strategy: guidance for healthcare workers – 22 December 2011

Posted on January 4, 2012. Filed under: Violence, Workforce | Tags: , , , |

Building Partnerships, Staying Safe -The health sector contribution to HM Government’s Prevent strategy: guidance for healthcare workers – 22 December 2011

Document type: Guidance
Author: Department of Health

“The attached document provides guidance and toolkit for front-line healthcare workers to support implementation of the Prevent awareness-raising programme. The health service is a critical partner in Prevent. Supporting vulnerable individuals and reducing the threat from radicalisers is a priority for the health service and its partners.”

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Reducing violence and aggression in A&E – Design Council [UK] – November 2011

Posted on November 18, 2011. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Violence | Tags: |

Reducing violence and aggression in A&E – Design Council [UK] – November 2011

“According to the National Audit Office, violence and aggression towards frontline hospital staff is estimated to cost the NHS at least £69 million a year in staff absence, loss of productivity and additional security. We know designers have what it takes to develop new systems that help reduce violence and aggression in A&E and commissioned a multi-disciplinary design team lead by PearsonLloyd to develop solutions.

Solutions
The Reducing violence and aggression in A&E design team have developed prototype solutions including:”

… continues

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Social and Economic Costs of Violence: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – October 2011

Posted on October 26, 2011. Filed under: Violence | Tags: |

Social and Economic Costs of Violence: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – October 2011
ISBN-10: 0-309-22024-6     ISBN-13: 978-0-309-22024-8

“Measuring the social and economic costs of violence can be difficult, and most estimates only consider direct economic effects, such as productivity loss or the use of healthcare services. Communities and societies feel the effects of violence through loss of social cohesion, financial divestment, and the increased burden on the healthcare and justice systems. Initial estimates show that early violence prevention intervention has economic benefits. The IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention held a workshop to examine the successes and challenges of calculating direct and indirect costs of violence, as well as the potential cost-effectiveness of intervention.”

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Domestic abuse services – Tool to improve domestic abuse services – Audit Commission [UK] – September 2011

Posted on September 27, 2011. Filed under: Violence | Tags: |

Domestic abuse services – Tool to improve domestic abuse services – Audit Commission [UK] – September 2011
An Audit Commission web resource for local commissioners and practitioners.

“Like all local public service providers, domestic abuse services are facing budget reductions. With less funding, partnerships need clear priorities. You may want to focus more on using mainstream staff and resources. You will want to show existing managers as well as new health and police commissioners how domestic abuse services can support mainstream statutory work and save money for partners as well as helping victims. This web resource can help you to do this. If you are involved in domestic abuse services either as an officer or a councillor, there should be something here for you. The links below walk you through the characteristics of a successful service and show you how to make practical changes with your partners to improve your own service.”

Download the domestic abuse self-assessment tool
Domestic abuse self-assessment tool ( XLS, 1mb )

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Preventing Violence Against Women and Children – Institute of Medicine Workshop Summary – 15 September 2011

Posted on September 16, 2011. Filed under: Violence | Tags: , |

Preventing Violence Against Women and Children – Institute of Medicine Workshop Summary – 15 September 2011

full text online 

“Across the world, violence against women and children poses a high burden on global health. Women and children are particularly susceptible to violence because often they have fewer rights or lack legal protection. Many women and children victims of violence know their perpetrators – often as family members or intimate partners – and are sometimes hesitant to report the crimes. Sometimes, a “cycle of violence” occurs, in which the victim eventually becomes a perpetrator. Over the last decade, researchers have gathered data on the growing magnitude of this violence, but many knowledge gaps still remain.

The IOM Forum on Global Violence Prevention held its first workshop January 27-28, 2011 to explore the prevention of violence against women and children. The workshop was designed to examine approaches to violence prevention from multiple perspectives and diverse levels of society. The workshop brought together stakeholders to discuss intervention strategies to prevent violence before it starts, prevent the recurrence of violence, prevent violence-related trauma, and stop the spread of violence to the next generation or social level. Speakers suggested a need to advance research on the co-occurrence of abuse on both child and partner, changing social norms, and the state of violence prevention research in low- and middle-income countries. This document is a summary of the workshop.”

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National Evaluation of Safe Start Promising Approaches. Assessing Program Outcomes – RAND – 2011

Posted on August 30, 2011. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Violence | Tags: |

National Evaluation of Safe Start Promising Approaches. Assessing Program Outcomes – RAND – 2011

by Lisa H. Jaycox, Laura J. Hickman, Dana Schultz, Dionne Barnes-Proby, Claude Messan Setodji, Aaron Kofner, Racine Harris, Joie Acosta, Taria Francois

“Safe Start Promising Approaches (SSPA) is the second phase of a community-based initiative focused on developing and fielding interventions to prevent and reduce the impact of children’s exposure to violence (CEV). This report shares the results of SSPA, which was intended to implement and evaluate promising and evidence-based programs in community settings. Fifteen program sites across the country were selected to implement a range of interventions for helping children and families cope with the effects of CEV. The settings, populations served, intervention types, types of violence addressed, community partners, and program goals differed across the 15 sites. The main body of this report provides information on the designs of the studies, instruments used, data collection and cleaning, analytic methods, and an overview of the results across the 15 sites. The appendixes provide a detailed description of the outcome evaluation conducted at each SSPA program, including a description of the enrollees, enrollment and retention, the amount and type of services received, and child and family outcomes over time.”

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Response to sexual violence needs assessments (RSVNA) toolkit: informing the commissioning and development of co-ordinated specialist services for victims of sexual violence – UK – 1 April 2011

Posted on April 5, 2011. Filed under: Violence |

Response to sexual violence needs assessments (RSVNA) toolkit: informing the commissioning and development of co-ordinated specialist services for victims of sexual violence – UK – 1 April 2011

Pages: 34

“This document is guidance for local area partnerships conducting a Response to Sexual Violence Needs Assessment.”

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Threatening Communications and Behavior: Perspectives on the Pursuit of Public Figures – National Academies Press – March 2011

Posted on March 28, 2011. Filed under: Violence |

Threatening Communications and Behavior: Perspectives on the Pursuit of Public Figures – National Academies Press – March 2011

“The papers in the collection were written within the context of protecting high-profile public figures from potential attach or harm. The research, however, is broadly applicable to U.S. national security including potential applications for analysis of communications from leaders of hostile nations and public threats from terrorist groups. This work high-lights the complex psychology of threatening communications and behavior, and it offers knowledge and perspectives from multiple domains that contribute to a deeper understanding of the value of communications in predicting and preventing violent behaviors.”

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Community-Based Violence Prevention: An Assessment of Pittsburgh’s One Vision One Life Program – RAND – March 2011

Posted on March 24, 2011. Filed under: Violence | Tags: |

Community-Based Violence Prevention: An Assessment of Pittsburgh’s One Vision One Life Program – RAND – March 2011

“In 2006, more than 6 million individuals were victimized by violent crimes. Although violence is below levels of the early 1990s, it remains high. The extent of violence and its impact highlight a critical need to develop and implement effective programs to reduce violence and victimization. Communities have initiated a wide range of such programs, and scholars have conducted numerous evaluations of varying quality of them. Reviews have found certain types of strategies and specific programs to be promising, but additional critical evaluations are needed to plan violence-reduction programs. This monograph assesses the implementation and impact of the One Vision One Life violence-prevention strategy in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 2003, Pittsburgh witnessed a 49-percent increase in homicides, prompting a “grassroots” creation and implementation of the One Vision One Life antiviolence strategy. This initiative used a problem-solving, data-driven model, including street-level intelligence, to intervene in escalating disputes, and seeks to place youth in appropriate social programs. Analysis of the program, which is modeled on similar efforts elsewhere, can help inform other efforts to address urban violence.”

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Family Violence and Commonwealth Laws – Australian Law Reform Commission issues paper – Employment and Superannuation – February 2011

Posted on March 15, 2011. Filed under: Violence | Tags: , , |

Family Violence and Commonwealth Laws – Australian Law Reform Commission issues paper – Employment and Superannuation – February 2011

“The ALRC was requested to consider what, if any, improvements could be made to relevant legal frameworks to protect the safety of those experiencing family violence.”

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Seeking security: promoting women’s economic wellbeing following domestic violence – Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse – March 2011

Posted on March 15, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Violence | Tags: , |

Seeking security: promoting women’s economic wellbeing following domestic violence – Australian Domestic & Family Violence Clearinghouse – March 2011

Rochelle Braaf & Isobelle Barrett Meyering

“This critical report analyses the experiences of 57 women affected by domestic violence and 50 workers to investigate the impact of domestic violence on women’s economic wellbeing, as well as the intersection of financial insecurity with their recovery overall.  Funded through FaHCSIA, Australian Domestic and Family Violence Clearinghouse researchers conducted the study during 2009-2010.”

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NHS joins forces with designers to tackle violence and aggression in A and E departments – 26 February 2011

Posted on February 28, 2011. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Violence | Tags: , |

NHS joins forces with designers to tackle violence and aggression in A and E departments – 26 February 2011

Reducing violence and aggression in A&E by design – Design Council

“Can you develop solutions that reduce the human and financial costs of violence and aggression in hospital Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments?

According to the National Audit Office, violence and aggression towards frontline hospital staff is estimated to cost the NHS at least £69 million a year in staff absence, loss of productivity and additional security.

Reducing violence and aggression in A&E by design challenges multi-disciplinary ‘design and make’ teams to improve the experience of A&E departments and make them safer for staff, patients and visitors. To participate in this open innovation challenge designers and architects need to team up with fabricators, building contractors, manufacturers, service producers and other specialist consultancies.”  … continues

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Anti-social behaviour – Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary – September 2010

Posted on September 29, 2010. Filed under: Violence |

Anti-social behaviour – Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary – September 2010

“In Spring 2010, HMIC carried out a review of anti-social behaviour (ASB) in England and Wales. This included an Ipsos MORI survey in which ASB victims were asked about their experiences and what happened when they called the police. HMIC also inspected the quality of the processes that forces use to tackle and respond to the problem.

Working with the Universities Police Science Institute at Cardiff University, we then used these results to identify how the police can best tackle ASB.

What works?

Forces have the best chance of providing victims with a good service if they do three key things:”

…continues on the site

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Effect of Drug Law Enforcement on Drug-Related Violence: Evidence from a Scientific Review – International Centre for Science in Drug Policy (ICSDP) – 2010

Posted on September 16, 2010. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Violence |

Effect of Drug Law Enforcement on Drug-Related Violence: Evidence from a Scientific Review – International Centre for Science in Drug Policy (ICSDP) – 2010

Extract from the Executive Summary
“Violence is among the primary concerns of communities around the world, and research from many settings has demonstrated clear
links between violence and the illicit drug trade, particularly in urban settings. While violence has traditionally been framed as resulting from the effects of drugs on individual users (e.g., druginduced psychosis), violence in drug markets and in drug-producing areas such as Mexico is increasingly understood as a means for drug gangs to gain or maintain a share of the lucrative illicit drug market.

Given the growing emphasis on evidence-based policy-making and the ongoing severe violence attributable to drug gangs in many countries around the world, a systematic review of the available English language scientific literature was conducted to examine the impacts of drug law enforcement interventions on drug market violence. The hypothesis was that the existing scientific evidence would demonstrate an association between increasing drug law enforcement expenditures or intensity and reduced levels of violence.

…most studies found that increasing drug law enforcement intensity resulted in increased rates of drug market violence.”

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The Joint Commission – Sentinel Event Alert: Preventing violence in the health care setting – Issue 45, June 3, 2010

Posted on June 16, 2010. Filed under: Violence | Tags: |

The Joint Commission – Sentinel Event Alert:  Preventing violence in the health care setting – Issue 45, June 3, 2010

Article about this in Health Leaders Media

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New report [UK] shows extent of peak in A&E attendances for assault on Friday and Saturday nights – January 2010

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Violence | Tags: |

New report [UK] shows extent of peak in A&E attendances for assault on Friday and Saturday nights

“Hospital records published today by The NHS Information Centre reveal for the first time the pattern of people attending A&E due to assault.

Of the nearly 13.8 million recorded attendances at A&E in 2008/09, 1.3 per cent (181,568) were due to assault – with attendances for assault peaking sharply on Friday and Saturday nights.

Nearly 50 per cent of recorded A&E attendances for assault took place over the weekend (between 6pm Friday and 00.59am Monday).

Because not all hospitals submit full records for A&E attendances to Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), the numbers reflected in today’s report are likely to underestimate the true totals.

Accident and Emergency Attendances in England, (Experimental Statistics) 2008/09 is the second annual publication by The NHS Information Centre from A&E HES data. It also follows, Accident and Emergency – Patient journey: Further analysis of the published 2007-08 A&E HES data (experimental statistics) which was published in November 2009.”

… continues on the website

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A Compendium of Sexual Assault Research – RAND – December 2009

Posted on December 31, 2009. Filed under: Violence | Tags: , |

A Compendium of Sexual Assault Research
By: Margaret C. Harrell, Laura Werber Castaneda, Marisa Adelson, Sarah Gaillot, Charlotte Lynch, Amanda Pomeroy
RAND Corporation   ISBN/EAN: 9780833047922   Pages: 318   Document Number: TR-617-OSD    Year: 2009

“Recognition of the prevalence and pernicious effects of sexual assault, and especially of acquaintance rape, has increased dramatically since the early 1990s. During this time, a large volume of research has enhanced understanding of the problem. This volume summarizes recent studies on sexual assault that the authors deem useful and relevant to the U.S. Department of Defense and other policymakers interested in sexual assault issues. The authors provide a brief overview of the prevalence and effects of sexual assault, and of important events and laws pertaining to sexual assault in both the civilian and military sectors. They then discuss the research that has been conducted on ten aspects of sexual assault, including its prevalence, victim and perpetrator characteristics and risk factors, prevention, recovery and coping, and the responses of the health care, law enforcement, and criminal justice systems. Finally, in this compendium’s annotated bibliography, the authors summarize more than 450 studies of sexual assault, tailoring their descriptions of research from a variety of fields for an audience of policymakers and informed lay readers.”

Free, downloadable PDF file(s) are available.

Full Document    (File size 1.8 MB, 7 minutes modem, < 1 minute broadband)

Summary Only   (File size 0.1 MB, < 1 minute modem, < 1 minute broadband)

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Towards healthier, fairer and safer communities – connecting people to prevent violence: a framework for violence and abuse prevention

Posted on April 7, 2009. Filed under: Violence |

The Framework for Violence and Abuse Prevention (UK Department of Health) outlines the impact of violence and abuse upon health and inequalities. It takes a life-course perspective in understanding why violence and abuse happens and makes links between the different forms of violence and abuse. It also provides an evidence-based framework for the best areas to intervene to prevent violence and abuse from occurring in the first place.

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