Rural Remote Health

Access all areas: new solutions for GP shortages in rural Australia – Grattan Institute – 29 September 2013

Posted on October 1, 2013. Filed under: General Practice, Pharmacy, Rural Remote Health, Workforce | Tags: |

Access all areas: new solutions for GP shortages in rural Australia – Grattan Institute – 29 September 2013

by Stephen Duckett and Peter Breadon

“This report outlines a plan for the parts of rural Australia with the lowest access to GP services. We don’t aim to bring these areas up to the national average, just to end the most extreme shortages. To achieve this, we have to make the most of scarce resources, while keeping GPs at the centre of the system.

The first step is to make much better use of pharmacists’ skills. Pharmacists are highly trained, have deep expertise in medicines, and are located in communities throughout Australia. But their role is far more limited in Australia than in many other countries.

With the agreement of GPs and patients, pharmacists should be able to provide repeat prescriptions to people with simple, stable conditions. They should also be able to provide vaccinations and to work with GPs to help patients manage chronic conditions.

We also need to increase access to other services, including diagnosis, which currently only GPs can provide. Australia should introduce physician assistants, health workers who practise medicine under the supervision of a doctor. There is good evidence that physician assistants could expand the care available in under-served areas, without compromising quality or safety, and at an affordable cost.

The proposals in this report only apply to the seven rural areas with the worst shortages of GP services. They can be in place within five years. In 2011-12, they would have resolved the worst shortages for just $30 million. The costs would mostly have been offset by fewer, or less costly, hospitalisations as a result of better population health.”

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Access all areas: new solutions for GP shortages in rural Australia – Grattan Institute – 29 September 2013 )

Cancer of the bush or salvation for our cities? Fly-in, fly-out and drive-in, drive-out workforce practices in Regional Australia – House Standing Committee on Regional Australia – Committee report – 13 February 2013

Posted on February 14, 2013. Filed under: Health Status, Rural Remote Health, Workforce | Tags: , |

Cancer of the bush or salvation for our cities? Fly-in, fly-out and drive-in, drive-out workforce practices in Regional Australia – House Standing Committee on Regional Australia – Committee report – 13 February 2013

About the Committee report

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Cancer of the bush or salvation for our cities? Fly-in, fly-out and drive-in, drive-out workforce practices in Regional Australia – House Standing Committee on Regional Australia – Committee report – 13 February 2013 )

Caring for the last 3%: telehealth potential and broadband implications for remote Australia – CSIRO – 26 November 2012

Posted on November 30, 2012. Filed under: Rural Remote Health, Telehealth | Tags: |

Caring for the last 3%: telehealth potential and broadband implications for remote Australia – CSIRO – 26 November 2012

Dr Sarah Dods, Ms Sarah Wood

“Australians living in rural and remote communities currently live with poorer health outcomes than those in urban areas. The current roll out of nationwide broadband connectivity brings new potential for telehealth services to these areas. While most premises will receive broadband by optical-fibe, the most remote areas will receive fixed-wireless or satellite services.

This report discusses how differences in bandwidth and latency between these types of broadband connection can have critical implications for telehealth services.”

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Caring for the last 3%: telehealth potential and broadband implications for remote Australia – CSIRO – 26 November 2012 )

National Strategic Framework for Rural and Remote Health – Standing Council on Health – 27 April 2012

Posted on May 1, 2012. Filed under: National Health Strategies, Rural Remote Health |

National Strategic Framework for Rural and Remote Health – Standing Council on Health – 27 April 2012

“Purpose and scope

The National Strategic Framework for Rural and Remote Health promotes a national approach to policy, planning, design and delivery of health services in rural and remote communities.

The Framework has been developed through the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council’s (AHMAC) Rural Health Standing Committee (RHSC)1 with the valued input of the National Rural Health Alliance and a wide range of other rural health stakeholders.

The Framework is directed at decision and policy makers at the national, state and territory levels. It emphasises the need for health and prevention services, programs, workforce and supporting infrastructure designed to meet the unique characteristics, needs,  strengths and challenges experienced in rural and remote parts of the country.

By providing this direction and identifying the systemic issues that most require attention, the Framework aims to improve health outcomes and return on investment for rural and remote Australians.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on National Strategic Framework for Rural and Remote Health – Standing Council on Health – 27 April 2012 )

Australian Medical Association – Regional/Rural Workforce Initiatives – 2012 – position statement – April 2012

Posted on April 18, 2012. Filed under: Medicine, Rural Remote Health, Workforce | Tags: , |

Australian Medical Association – Regional/Rural Workforce Initiatives – 2012 – position statement – April 2012

“How to use this Position Statement

The AMA has developed a Position Statement on regional/rural workforce initiatives because of the importance of improving the medical workforce supply in regional and rural Australia.

The Position Statement outlines a range of factors that influence Medical Practitioners to work in regional and rural areas and offers a range of solutions that would relieve current pressures and entice more doctors to work outside metropolitan areas. The Position Statement addresses undergraduate, post-graduate and continuing education. It covers remuneration together with a range of other influences such as hospital and general infrastructure, family support and rostering and locum services. It includes a section on International Medical Graduate (IMG) doctors.

Policy makers at all levels of government, medical educators and doctors interested in pursuing a career in regional and rural Australia can use this Position Statement.”

… continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Australian Medical Association – Regional/Rural Workforce Initiatives – 2012 – position statement – April 2012 )

Expenditure on health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2008-09: an analysis by remoteness and disease – AIHW – 2 November 2011

Posted on November 2, 2011. Filed under: Aboriginal TI Health, Health Economics, Rural Remote Health | Tags: |

Expenditure on health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2008-09: an analysis by remoteness and disease – AIHW – 2 November 2011

“In 2008-09, health expenditure for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people varied across remoteness areas, service types and disease groupings. The greatest difference in expenditure between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians was in Remote and very remote areas where, for every dollar spent per non-Indigenous Australian, $2.41 was spent per Indigenous Australian. Expenditure on genitourinary diseases, and mental and behavioural disorders, accounted for the highest proportions of admitted patient expenditure for Indigenous Australians (11% and 10% respectively). Additional analysis has been undertaken in the 2008-09 report to include expenditure on potentially preventable hospitalisations.”

ISSN 1323-5850; ISBN 978-1-74249-220-9; Cat. no. HWE 54; 30pp

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Expenditure on health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2008-09: an analysis by remoteness and disease – AIHW – 2 November 2011 )

Preparedness and Response to a Rural Mass Casualty Incident: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2011

Posted on February 24, 2011. Filed under: Disaster Management, Rural Remote Health | Tags: |

Preparedness and Response to a Rural Mass Casualty Incident: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2011

“Problems contacting emergency services and delayed assistance are not unusual when incidents occur in rural areas, and the consequences can be devastating, particularly with mass casualty incidents. The IOM’s Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events held a workshop to examine the current capabilities of emergency response systems and the future opportunities to improve mass casualty response in rural communities.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Videoconference consultants boost emergency stroke care – 16 February 2011

Posted on February 17, 2011. Filed under: Neurology, Rural Remote Health, Telehealth | Tags: |

Videoconference consultants boost emergency stroke care.  Allowing consultants to order drugs remotely is saving lives and money, according the medical lead of the NHS Stroke Improvement Programme – 16 February 2011

“Dr Damian Jenkinson said that letting groups of hospitals share stroke consultants, who use videoconferencing to examine patients and view brain scans, increases the use of clot-busting drugs.

There are too few consultants to provide round-the-clock cover at every major hospital in person, he told the Mobile and Wireless Healthcare conference in Birmingham: “We need network solutions to make this happen.”

Consultants aim to use the clot-busting drugs within three hours of a stroke taking place, as they help arrest the rapid death of brain cells caused by the condition.

Jenkinson, who is national clinical lead for the NHS Stroke Improvement Programme, said Lancashire and Cumbria had calculated that it would be able to provide the drugs to 400 patients from the 4,000 stroke admissions the area makes each year, rather than 20 as at present. In doing so it would save £2m annually, in return for one-off spending of £285,000 and annual costs of £115,000, with the savings including reduced hospital stays.”

…continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Australian health expenditure by remoteness: a comparison of remote, regional and city health expenditure – AIHW – 14 January 2010

Posted on January 14, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Rural Remote Health | Tags: |

Australian health expenditure by remoteness: a comparison of remote, regional and city health expenditure – AIHW – 14 January 2010

“The report looks at selected health services for the financial years 2001-02, 2004-05 and 2006-07 and examines the way these services were delivered across Australia. This analysis was performed using the Australian Standard Geographical Classification System to compare the expenditure and usage rates of the health services by residents of Major cities, Inner regional, Outer regional, Remote and Very remote areas of Australia.”

ISSN 1323-5850; ISBN-13 978-1-74249-099-1; AIHW cat. no. HWE 50; 172pp

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Insights from stroke survivors and providers of stroke care in rural England: Summary report – Commission for Rural Communities – 20 December 2010

Posted on January 14, 2011. Filed under: Neurology, Rural Remote Health | Tags: , |

Insights from stroke survivors and providers of stroke care in rural England: Summary report – Commission for Rural Communities – 20 December 2010

“This summary report traces the ‘care pathway’ that stroke sufferers typically follow in rural areas– from emergency care, through acute and rehabilitative care in hospital, to care received afterpatients return home.

Concern for the adequacy of service delivery in a rural context has been a major theme of thework of the Commission for Rural Communities (CRC) and its predecessor bodies for manyyears – not least because in any survey of rural people accessibility to services always figures asa major concern.

This report provides insights from users and providers about both the delivery of stroke-related services in England and the challenge that rurality poses for those services. By examining how living in a rural area affects stroke patients’ experiences, this summary is a first stage in tacklingproblems of access.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Ontatio – Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Rural and Northern Health Care Framework – December 2010

Posted on January 10, 2011. Filed under: Rural Remote Health |

Ontatio – Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Rural and Northern Health Care Framework – December 2010

“Ensuring rural and northern Ontarians have access to health care, as close to home as possible is a key priority for the Ontario government. As such, the government formed a Rural and Northern Health Care Panel as stage one of the development of a rural and northern health care framework. The mandate of this panel was to identify a vision, strategic directions and principles to assist government and Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs) in ensuring quality of care as defined by access to care in rural and northern communities. The panel has completed their work and submitted their report to the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care. The report is now available to the public.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

How to boost the rural/remote health workforce? It’s not all about the dollars – Croakey – 10 September 2010

Posted on September 10, 2010. Filed under: Rural Remote Health, Workforce | Tags: , |

How to boost the rural/remote health workforce? It’s not all about the dollars – Croakey – 10 September 2010

“The World Health Organization has released the first global recommendations for improving the retention of health workers in remote and rural areas.

You might think from the way that we often discuss this issue that it is a peculiarly Australian problem, and one that simply requires us to pay rural doctors more. Wrong on both counts.”

…continues on the Croakey site

Increasing access to health workers in remote and rural areas through improved retention: global policy recommendations – WHO 
Number of pages: 79
Publication date: July 2010
ISBN: 9789241564014

“Globally, approximately one half of the population lives in rural areas, but less than 38% of the nurses and less than 25% of the physicians work there. While getting and keeping health workers in rural and remote areas is a challenge for all countries, the situation is worse in the 57 countries that have an absolute shortage of health workers.

After a year-long consultative effort, this document proposes sixteen evidence-based recommendations on how to improve the recruitment and retention of health workers in underserved areas. It also offers a guide for policy makers to choose the most appropriate interventions, and to implement, monitor and evaluate their impact over time.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

A Bright Future for Rural Health: Evidence-Based Policy and Practice in Rural and Remote Australian Health Care – 2010

Posted on June 9, 2010. Filed under: Rural Remote Health | Tags: |

A Bright Future for Rural Health: Evidence-Based Policy and Practice in Rural and Remote Australian Health Care
Editors Ann Larson and David Lyle    Australian Rural Health Education Network    2010

ISBN 978-0-9775687-3-4

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Rural Health: Challenges of Distance, Opportunities for Innovation – NZ – National Health Committee – February 2010

Posted on February 18, 2010. Filed under: Rural Remote Health |

Rural Health: Challenges of Distance, Opportunities for Innovation – NZ – National Health Committee – February 2010

ISBN: 978-0478-33963-5 (print) 978-0-478-33964-2 (online)   HP: 4979

“Summary of publication

Rural Health: Challenges of Distance, Opportunities for Innovation focuses on how to protect and improve the health status of people living in rural New Zealand communities. The report examines the very real challenges faced in delivering sustainable, comprehensive health and disability services to rural communities and highlights the need for, and makes recommendations for improvements in three key areas: service delivery; system performance; and planning, data collection and research.

New Zealand rural communities are diverse with small populations spread over large geographic areas. In its report, the National Health Committee identifies a variety of factors that might impede people’s access to health and disability services in rural areas including socioeconomic deprivation, geographical barriers and distance, transport, telecommunications, the cost of accessing services and the acceptability of services. The National Health Committee concludes that these are all things that need to be addressed if the health needs of people living in rural areas are to be met.

The report identifies a number of recommendations and suggests actions to enable better access to health and disability services, with an emphasis on providing:

  • rural communities with comprehensive primary health care
  • supportive medical and non-medical technology
  • visiting services and transport support
  • supportive business models
  • community governance
  • increased scopes of practice
  • flexible, sustainable and efficient contract and funding arrangements.”
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...