Radiology

Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014-2024 – AIHW – 1 July 2014

Posted on July 1, 2014. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology | Tags: |

Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014-2024 – AIHW – 1 July 2014

“Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014–2024 presents cancer incidence projections at the jurisdictional health planning region level for 2014 to 2024. These projections were developed specifically for Australian Government Department of Health planning purposes.”

ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-588-0; Cat. no. CAN 82; 42pp

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Radiation Oncology National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Plan – NZ Ministry of Health – 20 June 2014

Posted on June 25, 2014. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology, Workforce |

Radiation Oncology National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Plan – NZ Ministry of Health – 20 June 2014

“This Radiation Oncology National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Plan (‘the Plan’) is intended to inform a nationally coordinated approach to radiation oncology service and capacity development, within the context of the National Cancer Programme.

The Plan focuses in particular on projected demand growth for radiation therapy, its implications for linear accelerator (‘linac’) and workforce capacity, and associated cost impacts. It also considers issues arising from this capacity modelling, including:

variation in access to radiation therapy
radiation therapy intervention rates
development of national benchmarking and standards to support performance and quality improvement
evaluation and uptake of new techniques and models of care
fostering national collaboration.

It builds on initial capacity planning of radiation therapy services published in 2012 by the regional cancer networks, and provides national guidance and a tool (the ‘National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Capacity Model’) to support further development of local and regional service and capacity planning by DHBs. In addition, the Plan will inform national decision-making by the Ministry and other central agencies on radiation oncology services over the next 5–10 years.

The aims of national planning for radiation oncology services are to support:”

… continues on the site

 

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Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute – 2014

Posted on June 12, 2014. Filed under: Radiology |

Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute – 2014

Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Opportunities for the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2014.
978-0-309-30209-8

“Description

It is probably only a matter of time before we witness the next event in which large numbers of people are exposed to ionizing radiation. In the past, planning a response to such an occurrence would have likely focused on the management of casualties from high-dose exposure. However, more recently, a different threat has come to the fore: accidental (through a containment breach in a nuclear power plant, for example) or intentional (via a “dirty bomb”) releases of radioactivity resulting in low-dose exposure to a population. The magnitude of the health risks arising from low-dose radiation exposure is uncertain, and this uncertainty has significant economic implications for public health decision making.

Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure examines recent scientific knowledge about the human effects of exposure to low-dose radiation from medical, occupational, and environmental ionizing-radiation sources. This report is intended to provide advice to the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) about its role in low-dose radiation health effects research. The report identifies current research directions in radiobiological science and assesses how AFRRI programs are advancing research along these directions. The recommendations of Research on Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation Exposure will provide guidance for AFRRI to build on its strengths and advance its mission while contributing to the body of scientific knowledge on the health effects of exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation.”

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CAR Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards for Breast Imaging and Intervention – Canadian Association of Radiologists – 24 October 2013

Posted on October 25, 2013. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology | Tags: |

CAR Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards for Breast Imaging and Intervention – Canadian Association of Radiologists – 24 October 2013

News release

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Extent of diagnostic imaging use in hospitals highlighted by new analysis [UK] – hscic – 2 October 2013

Posted on October 4, 2013. Filed under: Acute Care, Radiology | Tags: |

Extent of diagnostic imaging use in hospitals highlighted by new analysis [UK] – hscic – 2 October 2013

“Two in five patients using hospital services in 2012-13 had a diagnostic imaging procedure as part of their care, first-time data linkage by the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) shows today.

Today’s new analysis relates to all three main hospital services (admitted patient care, A&E and outpatients) in England and represents the first ever linkage of hospital data (Hospital Episode Statistics) to diagnostic imaging data (Diagnostic Imaging Dataset).

The report offers a starting point to better understanding imaging requirements and outcomes for patients undergoing different procedures in acute care.

It relates to almost 27 million patients (who were present in both the HES and DID datasets) who used an NHS-funded hospital service at least once in 2012/13. The key findings are:

Nine million patients were admitted to hospital at least once and of these, five million (58 per cent) had at least one imaging procedure during the year
Twelve million patients had at least one accident and emergency attendance and almost six million (around 48 per cent) of these also had at least one imaging procedure during the year
Twenty million patients had at least one outpatient appointment and nine million of these patients (45 per cent) had at least one imaging procedure in the year.

The HSCIC aims to build on today’s initial findings with a more in-depth report in 2014.”

… continues on the site

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National Maximum Wait Time Access Targets for Medical Imaging (MRI and CT) – Canadian Association of Radiologists – January 2013

Posted on April 3, 2013. Filed under: Radiology | Tags: |

National Maximum Wait Time Access Targets for Medical Imaging (MRI and CT) – Canadian Association of Radiologists – January 2013

Extract from the executive summary

“The Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) is a member of the Wait Time Alliance (WTA)1. Since 2005, the WTA has produced annual reports on the progress of addressing wait times in the five priority areas identified for focus in the 2004 First Ministers’ Health Accord. One
of those five priority areas was diagnostic imaging, particularly around MRI and CT. Clinical specialties established the national targets for wait times in these priority areas. Recognizing that any guidance that has been produced should undergo periodic review for continuing relevance in light of any new evidence or literature, the CAR determined that the medical imaging benchmarks for MRI and CT established in 2005 should be updated (the 2005 benchmarks are shared in Appendix A).”

… continues

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Human Radiosensitivity – RCE 21 – Health Protection Agency [UK] – 14 March 2013

Posted on March 15, 2013. Filed under: Radiology | Tags: , |

Human Radiosensitivity – RCE 21 – Health Protection Agency [UK] – 14 March 2013

Synopsis

“This report reviews evidence for variation in human radiosensitivity from epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies, considers mechanisms of radiosensitivity and ethical implications of current and potential future knowledge on the range of radiosensitivity in the human population. It concludes that there is growing evidence from a range of sources for variation in radiosensitivity that can affect the risk of radiation-induced cancer or, at higher doses, tissue damage. A proportion of this range is likely to have a genetic origin but there is also substantial evidence for lifestyle factors, and particularly tobacco smoking, affecting individual risk. Currently there is no adequate test predictive of individual radiation health risk, but knowledge is accumulating and therefore consideration of how this new knowledge might be used in radiological protection is important and timely.”

News release

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Cancer patients in crisis: responding to urgent needs – Royal College of Physicians (RCP), Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) – 21 November 2012

Posted on November 22, 2012. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Oncology, Radiology | Tags: , |

Cancer patients in crisis: responding to urgent needs – Royal College of Physicians (RCP), Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) – 21 November 2012

full report 

“Emergency admissions for patients with cancer remain problematic despite the development of acute oncology. There is more that could be done to improve their care and subsequent experiences and outcomes.

Patients and their carers often have a lack of information about what to expect and who to contact when their condition suddenly worsens and requires urgent medical attention – this is often referred to as a crisis.  Cancer management is complex and involves a number of teams and there has been little emphasis on planning for potential problems.  More proactive care would ensure that patients, their carers and health professionals are better equipped to respond when a person becomes acutely unwell.

When admitted to hospital there is a need to improve decision-making, coordination of care and communication between professionals and – crucially – with patients themselves. In unplanned and urgent situations, patients themselves may receive confusing or conflicting information or feel less able to assert their concerns and wishes. Too often patients receive fragmented care. Patients are often seen by multiple healthcare professionals and sometimes multiple medical specialties during an admission.

This results in some patients being treated suboptimally, especially where the cancer diagnosis clouds other considerations in their management. Others, especially nearing the end of life, may undergo repeated investigations and interventions that are not to their benefit. Some admissions, especially among patients already approaching the end of life, may be avoidable.

This new report Cancer patients in crisis: responding to urgent needs from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) and Royal College of Radiologists (RCR), including a foreword from Professor Sir Mike Richards, national clinical director for cancer, provides decision making tools to health professionals working in hospitals and the community, to help improve the care of cancer patients in crisis. It also proposes  standards of good practice in each care setting which should reduce risk and improve outcomes.

Patient and carer representative members of the working party have led on the development of an innovative planning wallet for patients. This is intended to encourage timely discussions about unexpected problems at any point in  a patient’s journey. It will prompt patients to seek and keep to hand important information and help to facilitate forward planning regarding their care.”

… continues on the media release site

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Towards best practice in interventional radiology – NHS Improvement – 29 June 2012

Posted on July 3, 2012. Filed under: Radiology | Tags: |

Towards best practice in interventional radiology – NHS Improvement – 29 June 2012

Towards best practice in interventional radiology draws together the findings from visits to interventional radiology (IR) services at proposed major trauma centres in England during 2011/12.

“Key messages
• High quality IR services are essential for safe and effective patient care.
• There is variation in provision of IR throughout England, particularly for potentially lifesaving emergency and out-of-hours procedures.
• Despite this there are already many examples of good practice and service delivery across the country.
• Networking will be essential to improve access to IR. There are challenges in developing effective operational delivery networks but there are already good examples of these in the UK.
• A good well resourced IR service can contribute to significant savings (both financial and non-financial) along care pathways in both planned and emergency care.
• The opportunity exists to use improvement techniques of standard work and visual management to create agreed standard operating procedures. This can support a network approach to providing on-call across a number of organisations.”

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Tracking Radiation Exposure from Medical Diagnostic Procedures: Workshop Reports – National Academies Press – 2012

Posted on June 18, 2012. Filed under: Patient Safety, Radiology |

Tracking Radiation Exposure from Medical Diagnostic Procedures: Workshop Reports – National Academies Press – 2012

Authors:  Committee on Tracking Radiation Doses from Medical Diagnostic Procedures; Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council [US]

ISBN-10: 0-309-25766-2    ISBN-13: 978-0-309-25766-4

“The growing use of medical diagnostic procedures is correlated with tremendous and undeniable benefits in the care of most patients. However, it is accompanied by growing concerns about the risks associated with diagnostic computed tomography and other procedures that utilize ionizing radiation. A number of initiatives in radiation safety in medicine have taken place in the United States and internationally, each serving different purposes. Their ultimate goals are to provide higher quality clinical management of the patient and to ensure that reasonable steps are taken to keep the exposures as low as possible without compromising diagnostic efficacy.

Tracking Radiation Exposure from Medical Diagnostic Procedures: Workshop Reports provides a summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the December 8-9, 2011, workshop titled “Tracking Radiation Exposure from Medical Diagnostic Procedures.” This workshop was organized by the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Academy of Sciences and sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. This workshop report was authored by a six-member committee of experts appointed by the National Academy of Sciences. This committee brought together public health regulators, physicians, manufacturers, researchers, and patients to explore “why,” “what,” and “how” to track exposure from medical diagnostic procedures and possible next steps.”

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Health Effects from Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields – Health Protection Agency – 26 April 2012

Posted on April 26, 2012. Filed under: Health Technology Assessment, Radiology | Tags: |

Health Effects from Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields – Health Protection Agency – 26 April 2012

ISBN: ISBN 978-0-85951-714-0

“Synopsis

A report by the Health Protection Agency’s independent Advisory Group on Non-ionising Radiation (AGNIR) has concluded that there is still no convincing evidence that mobile phone technologies cause adverse effects on human health.

The report updates AGNIR’s previous review in 2003, considers the scientific evidence on exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields, which are produced by mobile phone technologies and other wireless devices, such as Wi-Fi, as well as television and radio transmitters.”

Press release:  Comprehensive review on mobile phone technologies finds no solid evidence of health effects

26 April 2012

“A new report by the Health Protection Agency’s independent Advisory Group on Non-ionising Radiation (AGNIR) has concluded that there is still no convincing evidence that mobile phone technologies cause adverse effects on human health.”

… continues

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How trusts can make radiology reporting world class – Health Service Journal – 22 March 2012

Posted on April 23, 2012. Filed under: Radiology, Telehealth |

How trusts can make radiology reporting world class – Health Service Journal – 22 March 2012

by Charles House, Rhiannon Williams

“A new initiative could transform the way trusts manage their radiology reports and deliver substantial efficiency benefits.

It’s 2am, a time when most radiologists are tucked up in bed. As they sleep, urgent diagnostic images ping their way through a secure virtual private network from University College Hospital, in the heart of London, to Australia, where it’s lunchtime. Here they are picked up by UK-qualified consultant radiologists, reported and sent back across to London to the referring doctor.

This is an example of the NHS at its innovative best, working in a commercial partnership to improve efficiency and productivity along with the quality of care for patients. Radiology Reporting Online is a joint venture between University College London Hospitals Foundation Trust and Imaging Partners Online, a private company based in Sydney. It provides a rapid, round-the-clock reporting system that is already paying dividends.”

… continues on the site

Sollefteå and Borås hospitals. Sjunet, Sweden – radiologyconsultations between Sweden and Spain – European Commission – October 2006

“Tele radiology enables radiology departments in hospitals to connect with, and expand, the performance of their radiology services without having to employ extra locum or additional permanent radiologists. Reacting to a shortage of radiologists in Sweden, the involved hospitals implemented the analysed eHealth application, allowing regular teleconsultations for Swedish patients given by specialists in Spain.

This case study evaluates the economic impact of such services at two Swedish hospitals. Radiology nurses at Sollefteå and Borås hospitals conduct magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations, and for less urgent cases the images are sent to the Telemedicine Clinic in Barcelona for analysis via the Swedish secure ICT network for healthcare, Sjunet. Borås also regularly sends a number of computed tomography (CT) images. This lowers the pressure on the radiologists in Sollefteå and Borås, and shortens the patient waiting lists. The hospitals can not only better cope with the shortage of specialists in Sweden, but are also more flexible in coping with short term peaks in demand.”

… continues on the site

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Implementing 7 day working in imaging department: good practice guidance. A report from the National Imaging Clinical Advisory Group [NHS] – 9 January 2012

Posted on January 10, 2012. Filed under: Radiology, Workforce |

Implementing 7 day working in imaging department: good practice guidance. A report from the National Imaging Clinical Advisory Group [NHS] – 9 January 2012

“The focus of the work programme of the National Imaging Clinical Advisory Group (NICAG) led by Professor Erika Denton, National Clinical Director for Imaging is to improve the quality of services, and enhance the patient experience and outcomes.

This document will contribute towards the wider work around how routine seven day working could be introduced successfully across the NHS.”

 

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Managing high value capital equipment in the NHS in England – 25 October 2011

Posted on October 25, 2011. Filed under: Health Technology Assessment, Radiology |

MPs report on high value equipment in the NHS  – 25 October 2011
House of Commons, Public Account Committee

“The Commons Public Accounts Committee publishes it fifty third report of Session 2010-12, on the basis of evidence from the Department of Health.

The Rt Hon Margaret Hodge MP, Chair of the Committee of Public Accounts, said:

“High value equipment in the NHS – like MRI and CT scanners – is worth around £1 billion, but the way this equipment is bought and used is not providing value for money for the taxpayer.

We were shocked by the unacceptable response times for certain conditions. A modern NHS should not allow 50% of people who have a stroke to wait more than 24 hours for a scan. There are unacceptable variations between trusts in the number of scans per machine, from 7,800 to almost 22,000 a year; opening hours and waiting times.

The Department of Health has got to look at how machines can be used more efficiently to make the best use of scarce resources.

Not enough trusts are taking full advantage of the framework agreements the NHS Supply Chain negotiates. Even where they do, money is being wasted because trusts don’t join together to buy equipment and get the best deals by exploiting their bulk buying power.

The Department of Health is accountable for securing value for money in health spending but has no way of getting trusts to work together or tell them how to buy their equipment.

At a time when the NHS has to make £20 billion of savings, it is unacceptable that money is being wasted.

The Department must set out how it is going to drive value for money in a devolved world where every trust is an independent foundation trust not answerable to the Department.

… continues on the site

Media commentary
http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2011/oct/25/nhs-inefficiency-stroke-scan-delays

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Investigation into Medical Imaging, Credentialing and Quality Assurance. Phase 2 Report – Dr. Doug Cochrane, chair of the BC Patient Safety and Quality Council – 31 August 2011

Posted on September 30, 2011. Filed under: Patient Safety, Radiology |

Investigation into Medical Imaging, Credentialing and Quality Assurance. Phase 2 Report – Dr. Doug Cochrane, chair of the BC Patient Safety and Quality Council – 31 August 2011

Report of a review of suspect diagnostic scans

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Risk of Solid Cancers following Exposure to Ionising Radiation: Estimates for the UK Population – 23 August 2011

Posted on August 24, 2011. Filed under: Patient Safety, Radiology |

Risk of Solid Cancers following Exposure to Ionising Radiation: Estimates for the UK Population

New estimates on the risk of developing some types of cancer after exposure to ionising radiation have been published by the Health Protection Agency’s Advisory Group on Ionising Radiation (AGIR).

“AGIR reviewed the latest scientific evidence on the lifetime risks of developing ‘solid cancers’ – such as cancer of the breast, lung and colon cancer – following exposure to ionising radiation.

Professor Bryn Bridges, chairman of AGIR, said: “The new estimates are broadly in line with previous figures and have been used to calculate the cancer risks from various medical investigations that use ionising radiation; particularly CT scans and mammographic examinations which have become more common.”

Professor Sir Nicholas Wald, who chaired the Working Group, added: “The benefits of a medical procedure, such as surgery, should always outweigh the risks – including the risk of radiation induced cancer from an x-ray. This needs particular consideration in medical screening for cancers among people who are not showing any symptoms.”

Among the report’s conclusions are risk estimates for:

Mammography screening of women for breast cancer
Computed tomography (CT) assessment of coronary artery calcification in screening for heart disease
CT scanning in colorectal and lung cancer screening”

… continues on the site

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Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy – AHRQ – May 2011

Posted on May 23, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology | Tags: |

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy – AHRQ – May 2011

Tipton KN, Sullivan N, Bruening W, Inamdar R, Launders J, Uhl S, Schoelles K.
Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.
Technical Brief No. 6. (Prepared by ECRI Institute Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. HHSA-290-02-0019.) AHRQ Publication No. 10 (11)-EHC058-EF.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. May 2011.

“Objectives. Conduct a systematic literature scan for published data for the treatment of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and provide a broad overview of the current state of SBRT for solid malignant tumors.”

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Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) – launched 4 February 2011

Posted on February 4, 2011. Filed under: Radiography, Radiology |

Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) – launched 4 February 2011

“On Friday 4 February 2011, The Parliamentary Secretary for Health and Ageing, The Hon Catherine King MP, officially launched the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service at ARPANSA’s Yallambie campus.

About the ACDS

In 2010, the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council accepted the Commonwealth’s offer to fund the establishment of the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service to be located within the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, with the new service commencing operating at the beginning of 2011. The service will initially operate for a period of three years, under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Health and Ageing.

The ACDS will provide an integrated national approach to promoting safety and quality in radiotherapy, which is expected to lead to further improvements in radiotherapy treatment outcomes. Around 50,000 Australians require radiotherapy for cancer treatment every year. Australia has approximately 56 radiotherapy facilities at which these treatments are delivered, mostly by use of linear accelerators, of which there are nearly 150.

Radiation doses delivered to patients in Australia are checked by teams of medical physicists and radiation therapists employed in the radiotherapy clinics. The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service will provide these specialists with a source of independent checks for equipment and patient doses.

The result of the new service will mean that recipients of radiotherapy and their families can have even greater confidence that they are receiving the highest standard of treatment.

The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service will also help to maintain the quality of radiotherapy in Australia, and provide a national approach to radiation measurements, making radiotherapy more consistent across the country and safer for patients.”

…continues on the site

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Inside the Learning Curve: Customer-, Domain-, and Technology-Specific Learning in Outsourced Radiological Services – Harvard Business School – 3 December 2010, published online 21 January 2011

Posted on January 24, 2011. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Radiology | Tags: , |

Inside the Learning Curve: Customer-, Domain-, and Technology-Specific Learning in Outsourced Radiological Services – Harvard Business School – 3 December 2010, published online 21 January 2011
Jonathan R. Clark, Robert S. Huckman, Bradley R. Staats

“Abstract
We explore the specificity of volume-based learning in an outsourced setting. When producing a unit of output, the content of the knowledge gained can vary dramatically from one unit to the next. This suggests that while aggregate experience in learning-by-doing is generally valuable, not all prior experience has an equal impact on performance. To examine these differences we introduce a framework to unpack the multiple dimensions of experience that exist within one unit of work. We then empirically examine the customer-, domain-, and technology-specificity of learning. Our empirical setting is the context of outsourced radiological services where individual doctors at an outsourcing firm complete radiological reads for hospital customers. We find that customer-, domain-, and technology-specific experience—as compared to other experience—leads to improved productivity. We discuss the implications of our results for the study of learning and experience, as well as for outsourcers and the firms that use their services.”

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An evaluation of the impact of implementation of consultant practitioners in clinical imaging – Society of Radiographers – 2010

Posted on September 23, 2010. Filed under: Radiology, Workforce | Tags: , |

An evaluation of the impact of implementation of consultant practitioners in clinical imaging

ISBN: 987 1-871101-70-0
Published: 2010-07-01

Extract from the executive summary:

“Research to identify the scope of radiographic practice in 20081 recommended further work to evaluate the impact of implementation of the Career Progression Framework (CPF), and, in particular, the consultant practitioner role in clinical imaging.

As a result the Society and College of Radiographers (SCoR) commissioned two exploratory case studies. These were undertaken at two NHS trusts where all four tiers of the CPF had been adopted (assistant practitioner, radiographer, advanced practitioner and consultant). One case study was undertaken in the south of England and the other in the north. The sites had consultants specialising in gastro-intestinal (GI) imaging, breast imaging and Emergency Department (ED) services.

Interviews were undertaken with key personnel at each trust. Those participating consisted of consultant radiographers, service managers, a clinical manager (radiologist) and a consultant radiologist.

Each trust viewed the adoption of the CPF as a means of modernising service development and addressing gaps in service delivery. At both sites, the consultant role had been instrumental in bringing about change to meet service needs.  In planning prior to introduction of the CPF within the two trusts, the role requirements for the post (and the ‘four pillars’ of the consultant role) had been contextualised to the specific needs and situation within the relevant departments. Key steps were consultation within and external to the trust and agreement of job descriptions. Gaining the support of radiologists within trusts had also been essential. The strengths of individuals viewed as likely candidates for the consultant roles once they were instituted were also taken into account during the design process. External recruitment to consultant posts had been challenging; they had been mainly filled through internal promotion.”

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Canada – Use of MRI and CT exams varies greatly among provinces – July 2010

Posted on July 23, 2010. Filed under: Radiology | Tags: |

Canada – Use of MRI and CT exams varies greatly among provinces – July 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information

Canada performs fewer diagnostic imaging scans relative to population size than OECD average

“July 22, 2010—Diagnostic tests, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans, are more commonly used on patients in some provinces than in others, according to new data released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). For example, in 2009, rates of MRI exams performed in Alberta or New Brunswick were more than twice as high as those in Prince Edward Island or Newfoundland and Labrador, varying from highs of 54 exams per 1,000 people in Alberta and 51 per 1,000 in New Brunswick to lows of 23 per 1,000 in P.E.I. and 24 per 1,000 in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Similarly, the data shows significant variation among the provinces in the rates of CT exams performed on patients. New Brunswick and Nova Scotia had the highest rates of CT use (193 and 155 per 1,000 people, respectively) while P.E.I. and British Columbia had the lowest rates of use (104 and 106 exams per 1,000 people, respectively).”

…continues

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Imaging for acute kidney injury (acute renal failure): good practice recommendations from the National Imaging Board [UK] – 4 February 2010

Posted on February 9, 2010. Filed under: Nephrology, Radiology |

Imaging for acute kidney injury (acute renal failure): good practice recommendations from the National Imaging Board [UK] – 4 February 2010

Document type:   Publication
Author:   National Imaging Board

“The National Imaging Programme is led by Dr Erika Denton, National Clinical Lead for Diagnostic Imaging and chair of the National Imaging Board. The Imaging Programmes focus has been on reducing waiting times for imaging services in line with the 18 weeks target. The focus is now on sustaining these low waits; along with addressing wider diagnostic imaging issues to improve the quality of services, and enhance the patient experience.

The National Imaging Board was tasked to undertake this piece of work by Donal O’Donoghue, National Director for Kidney Care at DH, because of a consequence of the increased recognition of kidney disease following the publication of Part 2 of the Renal NSF and the inclusion of a CKD domain into the Quality Outcomes Framework and published NICE guidance on Chronic Kidney Disease has meant that there has been an increase in referrals into secondary care, and an increased uptake of diagnostics including renal ultrasound scanning.

These good practice recommendations support the implementation of existing guidelines as well as considering the possibility of “standardisation” of reporting to support optimal management of patients at the most appropriate part of the pathway. This document had also been reviewed by the Renal Association – Clinical Affairs Board, who support and endorse these best practice recommendations.”

* Download Imaging for Acute Kidney Injury (PDF, 41K)

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Scientists issue comprehensive report into health effects of ultrasound – [UK] Health Protection Agency – 2 February 2010

Posted on February 5, 2010. Filed under: Radiology | Tags: , |

Scientists issue comprehensive report into health effects of ultrasound – [UK] Health Protection Agency – 2 February 2010

“The independent Advisory Group on Non-Ionising Radiation (AGNIR), which reports to the Health Protection Agency, has reviewed the latest scientific evidence on the health effects of ultrasound (frequencies above 20 kilohertz) and infrasound (below 20 Hz).

The report finds that the available evidence does not suggest that diagnostic ultrasound affects mortality of babies during pregnancy or soon after birth. The evidence also does not suggest any effect on childhood cancer risk. There have, however, been some unconfirmed reports suggesting possible effects on the developing nervous system – for instance, on handedness of the child.

AGNIR concluded that there is no established evidence that diagnostic levels of ultrasound are hazardous. However, further research is needed to determine whether there are any long-term adverse health effects, especially following exposure of the unborn child.”

…continues

AGNIR report: Health Effects of Exposure to Ultrasound and Infrasound

The Health Protection Agency’s full response to the AGNIR report

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Interventional Radiology (IR): Improving Quality and Outcomes for Patients – UK – A Report from the National Imaging Board – November 2009

Posted on December 4, 2009. Filed under: Radiology |

Interventional Radiology (IR): Improving Quality and Outcomes for Patients – UK –  A Report from the National Imaging Board – November 2009

“There is variable provision of interventional radiology (IR) services throughout the NHS in England that can result in a variation in the quality of care delivered to patients both in emergency and planned care pathways.”

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Application of the 2007 Recommendations of the ICRP to the UK – Advice from the Health Protection Agency. RCE-12. June 2009

Posted on July 3, 2009. Filed under: Radiography, Radiology | Tags: , |

Update of radiation exposure guidance for the UK
Info copied from from the Health Protection Agency’s website:
2 July 2009

“Scientists at the Health Protection Agency have published their advice to UK bodies following new international guidance on ionising radiation*.

The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) published updated recommendations on protection against ionising radiation in 2007. The Health Protection Agency (HPA) has now published its advice on applying those recommendations.

Broadly the HPA has welcomed the ICRP’s recommendations and says that much of the advice is already being applied in the UK.

After reviewing ICRP guidance, the HPA recommends that the Government tightens control of public radiation exposure at any new build nuclear power stations or radioactive waste disposal sites to a level of less than 0.15 millisieverts (mSv) a year. The average annual dose that a person receives from natural ionising radiation is 2.2 mSv a year.

Part of the ICRP report looks at management of, and responses to, radiation emergencies. The HPA has concluded the ICRP’s guidance is helpful and is calling on all appropriate bodies to review their plans on how the aftermath of an incident could be managed.

Dr John Cooper, Director of the HPA’s Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, said: “ICRP’s recommendations have resulted from extensive international consultation, and in the UK we have also carried out an open consultation.

“Mostly there is no need to change UK regulations and procedures, but when these are reviewed in the future, the new recommendations should be implemented as described in our advice”.

Press enquiries:  Contact the Press Office at HPA Chilton, the Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards. Tel no: 01235 822786, 8822745 or 822737.

* Application of the 2007 Recommendations of the ICRP to the UK – Advice from the Health Protection Agency. RCE-12. June 2009. ISBN: 978-0-85951-647-1. Available by download from the HPA website:

Notes to editors
*The International Commission on Radiological Protection published its recommendations in 2007 following extensive consultation. In 2008 the HPA carried out a national consultation on the ICRP’s recommendations, and the feedback received during that process will be published later.
*Under the Health Protection Act 2004 which set up the HPA, one of its functions is to advise Government and other interested parties on the application of international recommendations on radiation protection in the UK.
*Previous advice from the former National Radiological Protection Board was that public exposure levels at radiation facilities, including new build, should be controlled below a maximum of 0.3mSv. ”

Last reviewed: 2 July 2009

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Radiology kit launched – NHS Institute for Improvement and Innovation – May 2009

Posted on May 21, 2009. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Radiology | Tags: |

Radiology kit launched

“The NHS Institute for Improvement and Innovation has launched a kit designed to help radiology departments review and assess their booking processes and identify areas for improvement for the benefit of patients and staff.

Developed in co-production with radiology departments and front line NHS staff Transforming your Radiology Services Kit: Focus on Booking Processes will help identify areas for improvement and provide solutions and tools.

Two copies of the kit will be sent to every NHS trust in England.”

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How many radiologists do we need? A guide to planning hospital radiology services

Posted on April 29, 2009. Filed under: Radiology, Workforce |

How many radiologists do we need? A guide to planning hospital radiology services – UK Royal College of Radiologists 2008  ISBN 978-1-905034-35-2 Ref No. BFCR(08)17

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Ontario Wait Times [for Emergency Room and for Surgery & Diagnostic Imaging]

Posted on April 9, 2009. Filed under: Diagnostics, Emergency Medicine, Pathology, Radiology, Surgery | Tags: , |

A wait times website from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

From Canada’s Health Newsweekly – Health Edition Online

Ontario sets ER wait-time targets
February 20, 2009
Ontario is setting firm targets for ER wait times.

The clock starts ticking when a patient registers at the ER and stops when the patient is discharged home or admitted to a hospital bed.

….continues on the Health Edition website

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Screening for the early detection of acoustic neuroma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss – 26 March 2009 – Health Services Assessment Collaboration (HSAC), NZ

Posted on April 9, 2009. Filed under: Otorhinolaryngology, Radiology | Tags: |

Paech, D, and Weston, A. Screening for the early detection of acoustic neuroma in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss: a rapid literature scan of MRI and other surveillance methods HSAC Report 2009; 2(1). 2009 Health Services Assessment Collaboration (HSAC), University of Canterbury ISBN 978-0-9582973-5-6 (online) ISBN 978-0-9582973-6-3 (print) ISSN 1178-5748 (online)
ISSN 1178-573X (print)

This report provides a brief scan of the literature available on the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and comparative surveillance techniques in screening for the early detection of acoustic neuroma (AN) in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL). It was commissioned by the New Zealand Ministry of Health

Health Services Assessment Collaboration (HSAC), NZ

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