Physiotherapy

Unlocking skills in hospitals: better jobs, more care – Grattan Institute – 13 April 2014

Posted on April 14, 2014. Filed under: Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy, Workforce | Tags: |

Unlocking skills in hospitals: better jobs, more care – Grattan Institute – 13 April 2014

Stephen Duckett and Peter Breadon

“Enabling less highly-trained hospital workers to play a bigger role could improve jobs for doctors and nurses, save public hospitals nearly $430 million a year and fund treatment for more than 85,000 extra people.

Doctors, nurses and allied health professionals such as physiotherapists and occupational therapists are all squandering their valuable skills on work that other people could do.

It doesn’t take 15 years of training to provide light sedation for a stable patient having a simple procedure, or a three-year degree to help someone bathe or eat – but that is the situation in Australian hospitals today. This mismatch of skills and jobs is putting heavy pressure on hospitals when there are already long waiting lists for many treatments and demand is growing fast.

The report suggests three ways – among many – that hospitals can get a better match between workers and their work. Nursing assistants could free up nurses’ time by providing basic care to patients. Specialist nurses could free up doctors’ time by doing common, low-risk procedures now done by doctors. More assistants could be employed to support physiotherapists and occupational therapists.”

… continues on the site

 

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Allied Health Professionals QIPP Toolkits – NHS – 14 March 2012

Posted on March 22, 2012. Filed under: Allied Health, Diabetes, Dietetics, Neurology, Oncology, Physiotherapy |

Allied Health Professionals QIPP Toolkits – NHS – 14 March 2012

“The Strategic Health Authority AHP Leads for England have worked with NHS London who compiled the AHP QIPP Toolkits These are designed to help commissioners design services that are of high quality whilst reducing cost. The Toolkits will be launched by Karen Middleton and Jim Easton at the kings Fund in London on March 19th Clinicians and provider organisations can use the toolkits to stimulate discussion and help planning. The NHS needs to find £20 billion pounds of savings through working transformationally. These toolkits show how AHPs are a vital part of that solution. The toolkits have been designed collaboratively with all 12 Allied Health Professional Bodies who endorsed their content and have been co produced in many areas with National clinical directors.”

AHP Stroke toolkit

AHP ONS toolkit – Oral Nutritional Support

AHP Musculoskeletal (MSK) care toolkit

AHP Cancer toolkit

AHP Diabetes toolkit

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Stretched to the limit: An audit of physiotherapy services in England – Chartered Society of Physiotherapy – 7 October 2011

Posted on October 18, 2011. Filed under: Physiotherapy |

Stretched to the limit:  An audit of physiotherapy services in England – Chartered Society of Physiotherapy – 7 October 2011

“There is clear evidence that early access to physiotherapy services is highly cost effective and clinically effective for a wide range of patients including stroke survivors, those with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and patients with long term conditions. Physiotherapy is particularly effective in the management and treatment of many health conditions, including musculoskeletal disorders
(back, neck and joint problems).

MSDs are the most commonly reported type of work related illness. According to the latest Labour Force Survey data, the number of working people with MSDs had risen from 538,000 in 2008/9 to 572,000 in 2009/10 . Over 9.3 million working days are lost each year through MSDs, costing society an estimated £7.4billion each year .

Despite the cost savings to the NHS and the benefits to patients that physiotherapy can deliver, the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) has discovered that physiotherapy services across the UK are currently being reduced – and this is having a negative impact on the quality of care for patients.”

… continues

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RA and Physiotherapy: a national survey – The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society in collaboration with the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy – 12 October 2011

Posted on October 18, 2011. Filed under: Physiotherapy, Rheumatology |

RA and Physiotherapy: a national survey – The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society in collaboration with the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy – 12 October 2011

New research reveals ‘significant breach of Rheumatoid Arthritis medical guidelines on the use of physiotherapy’

One in three people with RA wait for more than a year for referral to a physiotherapist

The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS) and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) today (12 October) publish a new UK-wide report highlighting the medical evidence around the benefits of physiotherapy in the treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), but also uncovering serious problems in the way physiotherapy services are being organised and accessed throughout the UK.

The report, the launch of which coincides with World Arthritis Day, calls for new measures to be introduced in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to increase compliance with RA medical guidelines and to protect existing physiotherapy services. A survey of NRAS members with RA also uncovered shockingly low referral rates, despite clear evidence that physiotherapy improved their function and mobility.”  … continues

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Engagement exercises to seek views on possibilities for introducing independent prescribing responsibilities for physiotherapists and podiatrists – UK – Consultation paper – 3 September 2010

Posted on September 9, 2010. Filed under: Allied Health, Physiotherapy, Podiatry |

Engagement exercises to seek views on possibilities for introducing independent prescribing responsibilities for physiotherapists and podiatrists – UK – Consultation paper – 3 September 2010

Document type: Consultation paper
Author: Department of Health
Published date: 3 September 2010

“The Allied Health Professionals Prescribing and Medicines Supply Mechanisms Scoping Project recommended further work be undertaken to take forward independent prescribing by physiotherapists and podiatrists. The two engagement exercises are seeking views on the development of independent prescribing for physiotherapists and for podiatrists.

Depending on the outcome, and subject to agreement by Ministers, these views may then inform and assist the development of a formal public consultation led by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) proposing specific amendments to the relevant legislation.

Responses can be made online, by email or in writing and are welcomed from individuals, groups and organisations.

Closing date for responses is Friday 26 November 2010.”

Download engagement exercise: physiotherapists (PDF, 1686K)

Download engagement exercise: podiatrists (PDF, 1826K)

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New NICE guidelines to help millions of people with low back pain – 27 May 2009

Posted on May 27, 2009. Filed under: Orthopaedics, Physiotherapy | Tags: , |

2009/031 New NICE guidelines to help millions of people with low back pain

“Millions of people with low back pain will benefit from new guidance issued to the NHS on the most effective ways to treat this often painful and distressing condition.

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) and the National Clinical Guideline Centre today (Wednesday 27 May) publish a guideline to improve the early management of persistent non-specific low back pain.  This covers people who have been in pain longer than six weeks but less than one year, where the pain may be linked to structures in the back such as the joints, muscles and ligaments.  Setting out a range of effective mainstream and complementary treatments, the guideline recommends what care and advice the NHS should offer to people affected by low back pain.” … continues on the website

Full text of the low back pain guideline (36.35 Kb 10 sec @ 28.8Kbps)

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AHRQ Releases New Evidence Report on Back Pain – February 2009

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Orthopaedics, Physiotherapy | Tags: |

US Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality – Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Back Pain Utilization, was conducted by AHRQ’s McMaster University Evidence-based Practice Center and funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Structured Abstract

Objectives: This systematic review was undertaken to evaluate which complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are being used for persons with back pain in the United States.
Data Sources: MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, CINAHL® and Cochrane Central® and a variety of CAM specific databases were searched from 1990 to November 2007. A grey literature search was also undertaken, particularly for clinical practice guidelines (CPG) related to CAM.
Review Methods: Standard systematic review methodology was employed. Eligibility criteria included English studies of adults with back pain, and a predefined list of CAM therapies.
Results: A total of 103 publications were evaluated; of these 29 did not present CAM therapy use stratified for back pain. There were a total of 65 utilization studies, 43 of which were American. Four publications evaluated the concurrent use of four or more CAM therapies and these suggest that chiropractic/manipulation is the most frequently used modality followed by massage and acupuncture. A limited number of publications evaluated utilization rates within multiple regions of the back and show that CAM was used least for treating the thoracic spine and most for the low back. However, rates of use of massage were similar for neck and lower back regions. Concurrent use of different CAM or conventional therapies was not well reported.
From 11 eligible CPG, only one (for electro-acupuncture) provided recommendations for frequency of use for low back pain of all acuity levels.
Eighteen cost publications were reviewed and all but one publication (cost-effectiveness) were cost identification studies. There is limited information on the impact of insurance coverage on costs and utilization specific to back pain.
Conclusions: There are few studies evaluating the relative utilization of various CAM therapies for back pain. For those studies evaluating utilization of individual CAM therapies, the specific characteristics of the therapy, the providers, and the clinical presentation of the back pain patients were not adequately detailed; nor was the overlap with other CAM or conventional treatments.

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