Pharmacy

Now or Never: Shaping Pharmacy for the Future – Nuffield Trust for the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) – 10 December 2014

Posted on December 10, 2014. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Now or Never: Shaping Pharmacy for the Future – Nuffield Trust for the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) – 10 December 2014

“In 2013 the RPS established a Commission on Future Models of Care Delivered Through Pharmacy. The commission’s report, Now or Never: Shaping Pharmacy for the Future, urged the RPS to take the lead in enabling pharmacists in England to take on roles in patient care.

The RPS accepted this accountable role, and followed the recommendation in Now or Never by commissioning an independent review from the Nuffield Trust to assess progress towards achieving the report’s vision.

Now More Than Ever: Why Pharmacy Needs to Act sets out the findings from this review. It comes soon after NHS England’s Five Year Forward View created broader opportunities for pharmacists than ever before, opening the door for them to provide frontline urgent and out-of hours care services, and work as part of new GP federations.”

… continues on the site

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Ensuring access to working antimicrobials – Parliament [UK] Commons Select Committee [Science and Technology] – 7 July 2014

Posted on July 11, 2014. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Ensuring access to working antimicrobials – Parliament [UK] Commons Select Committee [Science and Technology] – 7 July 2014

Report

“Ministers must stop unnecessary use of antibiotics in healthcare and farming

The Government’s announcement of a review of the economics of antimicrobial research is a welcome step in addressing one aspect of antimicrobial resistance. However, current practice across both health and veterinary services is failing to prevent the inappropriate prescription of antibiotics. The Government needs to set clear responsibilities at all levels of the NHS and veterinary medicine to achieve better stewardship of the antimicrobial drugs vital in modern medicine, the Science and Technology Committee has warned.”

… continues on the site

 

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Professional Standards for Hospital Pharmacy Services [Revised, version 2] – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – July 2014

Posted on July 11, 2014. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

Professional Standards for Hospital Pharmacy Services [Revised, version 2] – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – July 2014

About Professional Standards for Hospital Pharmacy Services [Revised, version 2] –  Royal Pharmaceutical Society – July 2014

“In 2012, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society published professional standards for hospital pharmacy services. These professional standards aimed to ensure that patients receive a high quality pharmacy service across the full range of service providers, whether provided in house or outsourced. We identified 10 overarching professional standards, under which sit several ‘dimensions’of practice that encompass all pharmacy services across a range of care settings.

In 2014, we are delighted to re-launch the refreshed professional standards, which have been revisited in light of the Francis review of events at Mid Staffordshire Foundation Trust and the response to that review, the report of the National Advisory Group on the Safety of Patients in England (commonly referred to as the Berwick report).

More emphasis has been given to some of the key themes, including:”

… continues on the site

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Management of the National Medical Stockpile – Australian National Audit Office – 26 June 2014

Posted on July 2, 2014. Filed under: Pharmacy |

Management of the National Medical Stockpile – Australian National Audit Office – 26 June 2014

“The audit objective was to assess the effectiveness of the Department of Health’s management of the National Medical Stockpile.”

 

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The Review of Specialist Pharmacy Services in England – NHS England – 28 May 2014

Posted on May 30, 2014. Filed under: Pharmacy |

The Review of Specialist Pharmacy Services in England – NHS England – 28 May 2014

Specialist Pharmacy Services (SPS)

“Delivered by around 100 senior pharmacy professionals and primarily focused on hospital care, Specialist Pharmacy Services (SPS), underpin the safe, effective and efficient use of medicines across the country. This review, led by Dr Keith Ridge CBE, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer, sets out a way to provide SPS in a safe, sustainable and equitable manner.

The first steps towards this are set out in the accompanying letter from the Dr Keith Ridge CBE, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer.”

 

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Declaration on Antibiotic Resistance – Antibiotic Resistance Coalition – 22 May 2014

Posted on May 26, 2014. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy | Tags: |

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New medicines, better medicines, better use of medicines: a guide to the science underpinning pharmaceutical practice – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – May 2014

Posted on May 12, 2014. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

New medicines, better medicines, better use of medicines: a guide to the science underpinning pharmaceutical practice – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – May 2014

Report: New medicines, better medicines, better use of medicines: a guide to the science underpinning pharmaceutical practice – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – May 2014

“Pharmaceutical science in the UK has a long and excellent record of medicines research and development, being at the forefront of many major advances in modern medicines and their use.

The guide, New Medicines, Better Medicines, Better Use of Medicines, developed by the Society’s Pharmaceutical Science Expert Advisory Panel, summarises the important role pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists have played and continue to play in the development and use of medicines. It highlights the major challenges and opportunities faced when creating new medicines, improving existing medicines or ensuring the better, safer, use of medicines. The guide contains seven recommendations arising from the challenges, and which identify areas for development, expansion, change and innovation for the future.”

 

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Handbook for Homecare Services in England – Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) – 7 May 2014

Posted on May 12, 2014. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , , |

 

Handbook for Homecare Services in England – Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) – 7 May 2014

 

“The RPS believes that patients receiving homecare services must receive consistently high quality services so they can get the best outcomes from their medicines. Multiple agencies need to work together to ensure the seamless provision of this care. The Handbook for Homecare Services in England is designed to further support this aim, by sharing best practice and facilitating shared care for those involved in the provision of medicines.”

 

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Redirecting innovation in US health care: options to decrease spending and increase value – RAND Health – 2014

Posted on May 6, 2014. Filed under: Health Informatics, Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Redirecting innovation in US health care: options to decrease spending and increase value – RAND Health – 2014

Extract:

“A leading cause of high and growing spending is new medical technologies. Previous studies aimed at reining in spending considered changing the ways in which existing technologies are used. Our work for this project focused on identifying promising policy options to change which medical technologies are created in the first place, with
these two related policy goals:

1. Reduce total health care spending with the smallest possible loss of health benefits.
2. Ensure that new medical products that increase spending are accompanied by health benefits that are worth the spending increases.

These goals reflect our definition of the “value” of a medical technology, which compares the increase in population health from using it to the extra spending attributable to its use. A medical product can have large health benefits for some patients and little or no benefit for others. Thus, a key issue for increasing value is improving the alignment between products and patients who will benefit from them.We define medical technology broadly to include all applications of knowledge to practical medical problems. However, in this study we focused more narrowly on medical products, specifically drugs, devices, and health information technology (HIT).”

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Drug Use Among Seniors on Public Drug Programs in Canada, 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 1 May 2014

Posted on May 5, 2014. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Drug Use Among Seniors on Public Drug Programs in Canada, 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 1 May 2014

“Most seniors in Canada are taking at least 5 drugs—and that number increases dramatically for older seniors and those living in long-term care facilities, according to a new report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

Drug Use Among Seniors on Public Drug Programs in Canada, 2012 found that nearly two-thirds of seniors (those age 65 and older) are taking 5 or more prescription drugs. Drug use increases with age, with more than 40% of Canadians age 85 and older taking more than 10 drugs. Additionally, seniors living in long-term care facilities take more medications than those who are living in the community; nearly two-thirds are taking at least 10 drugs.”

Report

“Although seniors those age 65 and older account for only 15% of the Canadian population, they are estimated to account for 40% of all spending on prescribed drugs and 60% of public drug program spending. Seniors take more drugs than younger Canadians because, on average, they have a higher number of chronic conditions. Although taking multiple medications may be necessary to manage these conditions it is important to consider the benefits and risks of each medication and the therapeutic goals of the patient. Drug use is also important to monitor from a spending perspective, as increased drug utilization has been found to be the biggest driver of drug spending in Canada.”

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Antimicrobial resistance: global report on surveillance 2014 – WHO – April 2014

Posted on May 1, 2014. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Antimicrobial resistance: global report on surveillance 2014 – WHO – April 2014

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First major survey of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians reveals picture of pharmacy today – 3 April 2014

Posted on April 9, 2014. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Pharmacy, Workforce |

First major survey of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians reveals picture of pharmacy today – 3 April 2014

“The General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) has published the findings of its first major survey about the day-to-day roles and responsibilities of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians.

The findings will be used by the GPhC to inform its ongoing work to improve the way pharmacy professionals and services are regulated. This includes developing new approaches to assuring the continuing fitness to practise of registrants and the quality of education and training.

The full results of the Registrant Survey 2013 are also being made publicly available to help others, including those working in public health policy and workforce planning, to develop a greater understanding of pharmacy practice today.

Over twenty nine thousand registered pharmacy professionals responded to the survey; 15,553 pharmacists and 13,515 pharmacy technicians. This is the first survey of its kind of pharmacy technicians and it provides important insights into areas including employment, responsibilities and appraisals.

Roles and responsibilities:

Ninety per cent of pharmacist and 91% of pharmacy technicians reported being in patient-facing roles:

• When asked about their main responsibilities, pharmacists most frequently mentioned providing advice and information to patients and carers (70%), supplying medicines and medical devices (63%) and providing advice and information to health professionals (35%)

• Pharmacy technicians most frequently mentioned supplying medicines and medical devices (71%), providing advice and information to patients and carers (55%) and routine tasks to manage pharmacy environment (49%).

Appraisals:

The majority of pharmacists (60%) and pharmacy technicians (72%) reported having an appraisal in the last 12 months. The survey found high levels of appraisal in hospitals (80% of pharmacists and 81% of pharmacy technicians) and large multiple pharmacies (69% of pharmacists and 75% of pharmacy technicians) in particular. There were much lower levels of appraisal in community pharmacies with four or fewer stores (17% of pharmacists and 45% of pharmacy technicians).

• 70% of pharmacists and 90% of pharmacy technicians said their appraisal was carried out by another professional

• When appraisals in community pharmacies with four or fewer stores occurred these were more likely to be carried out by another professional (80%) than appraisals in large multiple settings (52%).

The information gathered by the survey gives a useful insight into appraisals as the GPhC begins work to develop the framework for continuing professional development. The GPhC also plans to carry out further work with employers, professional bodies and others to gain a more detailed understanding of how pharmacy professionals are assessed in the workplace.”

… continues on the site

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Consultation skills for pharmacy practice framework launched – NHS Health Education England – 19 March 2014

Posted on March 21, 2014. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Pharmacy |

Consultation skills for pharmacy practice framework launched – NHS Health Education England – 19 March 2014

“Pharmacy, alongside the whole of the NHS, is committed to putting patients at the centre of their own healthcare, enabling them to share decisions and make informed choices about their own health. Effective consultations with patients lie at the heart of delivering patient-centred care.

Health Education England (HEE) has today launched a new framework to help pharmacy professionals to improve their skills in carrying out consultations with patients and in delivering public health messages.

The framework, developed by HEE, the Centre for Pharmacy Postgraduate Education (CPPE) and key stakeholders across the profession, represents a national programme of change in pharmacy and will apply to more than 60,000 pharmacy professionals across England. This includes pharmacists, pharmacy technicians and pre-registration trainee pharmacists across a number of sectors such as hospitals, community pharmacies, primary care, GP practices, care homes, secure environments and the armed forces. It will also impact on Universities and Colleges who are training the next generation of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians.

The framework, which has been endorsed by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and the Association of Pharmacy Technicians UK, has been structured around the following six questions:

Why are consultation and public health skills important for all pharmacy professionals?
How do I know what standard is expected of me?
How do I know how effective my consultation skills are now?
How do I improve my performance?
How can I check my learning and development?
How do I continue to develop my performance?

The key components are”

… continues on the site

Consultation skills for pharmacy practice: practice standards for England For all pharmacy professionals – March 2014

Website

Standards of Conduct, ethics and performance – General Pharmaceutical Council

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Patient safety alert to improve reporting and learning of medication and medical devices incidents – NHS England – 20 March 2014

Posted on March 21, 2014. Filed under: Health Technology Assessment, Patient Safety, Pharmacy |

Patient safety alert to improve reporting and learning of medication and medical devices incidents – NHS England – 20 March 2014

“NHS England and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) have today jointly issued two patient safety alerts to help healthcare providers increase incident reporting for medication errors and medical devices. The alerts instruct providers to take specific steps that will improve data report quality; and will see the establishment of national networks to maximise learning and provide guidance on minimising harm relating to these two incident types.

The patient safety alerts call on large healthcare provider organisations across a range of healthcare sectors, along with healthcare commissioners, to identify named leaders in both medication and medical device safety roles. These leaders will be supported by two new national networks for medication and medical device safety. The networks will improve communication and feedback on reported safety issues, and enable safer practice to be discussed and shared through webinars, online forums, conferences and workshops.

Smaller healthcare provider organisations should continue to report medication and device incidents, take action to improve medication and device safety locally and work with local safety champions.

This joint work responds to a number of strategic drivers including recommendations by Sir Robert Francis QC and Professor Don Berwick on patient safety and a review by Earl Howe into MHRA’s handling of the PIP breast implant fraud. All recommended taking steps to maximise the quality and quantity of adverse incident reports from healthcare organisations.”

… continues on the site

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Drug Shortages: public health threat continues, despite efforts to help ensure product availability – GAO – February 2014

Posted on February 12, 2014. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Drug Shortages: public health threat continues, despite efforts to help ensure product availability – GAO – February 2014

Drug Shortages Continue to Vex Doctors – New York Times – 10 February 2014

“Despite efforts by the Obama administration to ease shortages of critical drugs, shortfalls have persisted, forcing doctors to resort to rationing in some cases or to scramble for alternatives, a government watchdog agency said on Monday. The number of annual drug shortages — both new and continuing ones — nearly tripled from 2007 to 2012.

In recent years, drug shortages have become an all but permanent part of the American medical landscape. The most common ones are for generic versions of sterile injectable drugs, partly because factories that make them are aging and prone to quality problems, causing temporary closings of production lines or even entire factories.

The analysis by the United States Government Accountability Office, released Monday, was required by a 2012 law that gave the Food and Drug Administration more power to manage shortages. The watchdog agency was designated to evaluate whether the F.D.A. had improved its response to the problem, among other things.

The accountability office concluded that the F.D.A. was preventing many more shortages now than in the past — 154 potential shortages in 2012 compared with just 35 in 2010 — but that the total number of shortages has continued to grow. In 2012, the number of drugs in short supply, both new and long-term, was 456, the report said, up from 154 in 2007. Such drugs now include the heart medicine nitroglycerin, and cisatracurium, which is used to paralyze muscles during surgery and for patients on ventilators.

“We are at a public health crisis when we don’t have the medicines to treat acutely ill patients and we don’t have the basics like intravenous fluids,” said Erin Fox, a drug expert at the University of Utah whose data was used in the analysis. The most acute shortage now is that of basic IV fluids, she said.”

… continues on the site

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Getting a grip on safer medicine for children – European Commission – 10 January 2014

Posted on January 31, 2014. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Pharmacy |

Getting a grip on safer medicine for children – European Commission – 10 January 2014

“Many drugs prescribed for children have not been appropriately tested for use on this age group. Such drugs frequently lack adequate information about the correct dosage and how best to administer them.

These longstanding problems with potential health risks have triggered an international response in the form of the European Union (EU)-funded GRiP (Global Research in Paediatrics) project.

Since 2011 the GRiP network of specialists in the medical care of children (paediatrics) has been working to improve the development and safe use of medicines for children. With involvement from research institutes and organisations from across Asia, Europe and the United States, as well as partnerships with major international networks, the project involves input from more than 1,000 researchers.

To pool this information, an ‘infrastructure matrix’ on the safe use of medicine in children has been developed. This ‘matrix’ is linking existing healthcare databases in Europe and the US to assess the occurrence of diseases in children and the effects of drugs used (including vaccines).

“We have developed an international platform for paediatric drug formulation. This enables us to share knowledge and educate professionals on drug development and support clinical trials worldwide,” explains Carlo Giaquinto, coordinator of the GRiP network. “Our ultimate goal is to better use the available knowledge and the existing research capacity. We focus particularly on the needs of newborn babies,” he adds.

Research needs to be stepped up in this area and the GRiP project is developing an internationally recognised training programme to increase the number of trained paediatric clinical pharmacologists, researchers and formulation scientists.

The team is also exploring new procedures and methodologies for clinical trials in children in order to fill the important gaps that currently exist in paediatric medicine.

“The infrastructure matrix and training programme being developed by the GRiP team are essential tools for improving the safe use of medicines for children. The project brings together an exceptional range of high quality scientists and organisations that are active in the EU and US paediatric medicines research,” says Carlo Giaquinto.

The work of the GRiP team is expected to support the paediatric legislation being introduced in the EU and the US which obliges companies to test the impact of new drugs on children.”

GRIP

“Global Research in Paediatrics (GRiP) is a network of scientists which aims to stimulate and facilitate the development and safe use of medicines in children. GRiP aims to become the leading research network in the field of paediatric clinical pharmacology.”

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Capturing Value from Health Technologies in Lean Times – C.D. Howe Institute – 18 December 2013

Posted on January 14, 2014. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy |

Capturing Value from Health Technologies in Lean Times – C.D. Howe Institute – 18 December 2013

“In budget-constrained times, adopting new drugs or medical technology is a high-stakes challenge that requires a comprehensive, balanced approach, according to a report released today by the C.D. Howe Institute. In “Capturing Value from Health Technologies in Lean Times,” authors Ake Blomqvist, Colin Busby and Don Husereau argue healthcare policymakers should make greater use of Health Technology Assessment (HTA), a policy tool that can help them balance demand and supply pressures for new technologies within a health-system budget.”

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Realizing the Promise of Healthcare Innovation in Ontario – Increasing Value for the Patient, Health System and Economy – Ontario Bioscience Innovation Organization – December 2013

Posted on January 14, 2014. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Realizing the Promise of Healthcare Innovation in Ontario – Increasing Value for the Patient, Health System and Economy – Ontario Bioscience Innovation Organization – December 2013

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Drugs: new psychoactive substances and prescription drugs – [UK] House of Commons, Home Affairs Committee – 20 December 2013

Posted on December 31, 2013. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Pharmacy |

Drugs: new psychoactive substances and prescription drugs – [UK] House of Commons, Home Affairs Committee – 20 December 2013

“In December 2012, we publish ed a report entitled Drugs: Breaking the Cycle, which contained a number of recommendations relating to drugs policy, all of which are reproduced in the annex below. In November 2013, we undertook to follow up on two of the specific issues raised with in that report—new psychoactive substances and addiction to prescription drugs.”

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Evidence briefings on interventions to improve medication safety (several) – Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – 17 December 2013

Posted on December 18, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Evidence briefings on interventions to improve medication safety (several) – Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – 17 December 2013

Evidence briefings on interventions to improve medication safety: Electronic medication administration records

Evidence briefings on interventions to improve medication safety: Reducing interruptions during medication preparation and administration

Evidence briefings on interventions to improve medication safety: Double-checking medication administration

Evidence briefings on interventions to improve medication safety: Automated dispensing systems

Evidence briefings on interventions to improve medication safety: Bar code medication administration systems

National Medication Alert Vincristine administration

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Now or Never: Shaping pharmacy for the future – Report of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s independent Commission into Future Models of Care – 5 November 2013

Posted on December 17, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Now or Never: Shaping pharmacy for the future – Report of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society’s independent Commission into Future Models of Care – 5 November 2013

 

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Poor pricing progress: price disclosure isn’t the answer to high drug prices – Grattan Institute – 1 December 2013

Posted on December 3, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Poor pricing progress: price disclosure isn’t the answer to high drug prices – Grattan Institute – 1 December 2013

“While the wholesale price of seven medicines fell by about a third today, Australia has a long way to go before consumers pay fair prices for pharmaceuticals.

Even after today’s reductions, Australian prices for the seven drugs are on average 14 times higher than prices for the same medicines in the United Kingdom.

Australia’s “price disclosure” policy was introduced in 2007 in a bid to cut costs. But drugs that have just been through this process have wholesale prices that are on average over 16 times the lowest price in New Zealand, the UK and the Canadian province of Ontario.

Under price disclosure, pharmacies are forced to reveal discounts on drug prices that manufacturers provide them, and the Government accordingly reduces the amount paid to pharmacies for each drug.

But Grattan Institute’s earlier report, Australia’s bad drug deal, revealed that if the Government benchmarked the prices of generic drugs against prices paid overseas it could save more than $1 billion a year in payments to manufacturers.

The Government’s purchasing policy needs to be much tougher on manufacturers and much fairer for consumers. It is not just a matter of saving money: nearly one in 10 Australians doesn’t take medicines a doctor prescribes because of cost.

For six of the seven drugs with price cuts today, benchmarking would save patients nearly $20 more for each box of pills, on average.”

… continues on the site

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Polypharmacy and medicines optimisation: Making it safe and sound – The King’s Fund – 28 November 2013

Posted on December 2, 2013. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Pharmacy |

Polypharmacy and medicines optimisation: Making it safe and sound – The King’s Fund – 28 November 2013

“Polypharmacy – the concurrent use of multiple medications by one individual – is an increasingly common phenomenon that demands attention at clinical policy and practice level. Driven by the growth of an ageing population and the rising prevalence of multi-morbidity, polypharmacy has previously been considered something to avoid. It is now recognised as having both positive and negative potential, depending on how medicines and care are managed.

This report proposes a pragmatic approach, offering the terms ‘appropriate’ and ‘problematic’ polypharmacy to help define when polypharmacy can be beneficial. Drawing on literature from predominantly Western countries, the report traces the occurrence of polypharmacy in primary and secondary care, and in care homes. It explores systems for managing polypharmacy and considers it in the context of multi-morbidity and older people, offering recommendations for improving care in both cases.”

… continues on the site

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Health Professionals Prescribing Pathway project [final pathway and report] – Health Workforce Australia – November 2013

Posted on November 19, 2013. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Health Professions, Pharmacy |

Health Professionals Prescribing Pathway project [final pathway and report] – Health Workforce Australia – November 2013

“Overview

Improvements to health workforce productivity and flexibility are vital if the workforce is to meet the growing demand for healthcare across Australia. One strategy to assist with this improvement is the development of a national pathway to prescribing by health professionals other than doctors.

The Health Professionals Prescribing Pathway (HPPP) is a Health Workforce Australia (HWA) project that seeks to deliver:

A national approach to prescribing by health professionals, other than doctors, that covers important concepts such as prescribing models, competency attainment, registration and endorsement, and safety, quality and practice issues.
An implementation strategy for a national prescribing pathway.

Latest news

The first stage of the HPPP project is complete and work will now commence on implementation. A report containing the final HPPP and high level recommendations for implementation was approved by the Standing Council on Health on 8 November 2013.

The final HPPP can be accessed here (pdf).

The final HPPP report can be accessed here (pdf).

HWA will now work with governments, educators, accreditation bodies and the national boards on the implementation of HPPP. This will include addressing key issues such as regulatory practice, education standards, accreditation and training.”

… continues on the site

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Access all areas: new solutions for GP shortages in rural Australia – Grattan Institute – 29 September 2013

Posted on October 1, 2013. Filed under: General Practice, Pharmacy, Rural Remote Health, Workforce | Tags: |

Access all areas: new solutions for GP shortages in rural Australia – Grattan Institute – 29 September 2013

by Stephen Duckett and Peter Breadon

“This report outlines a plan for the parts of rural Australia with the lowest access to GP services. We don’t aim to bring these areas up to the national average, just to end the most extreme shortages. To achieve this, we have to make the most of scarce resources, while keeping GPs at the centre of the system.

The first step is to make much better use of pharmacists’ skills. Pharmacists are highly trained, have deep expertise in medicines, and are located in communities throughout Australia. But their role is far more limited in Australia than in many other countries.

With the agreement of GPs and patients, pharmacists should be able to provide repeat prescriptions to people with simple, stable conditions. They should also be able to provide vaccinations and to work with GPs to help patients manage chronic conditions.

We also need to increase access to other services, including diagnosis, which currently only GPs can provide. Australia should introduce physician assistants, health workers who practise medicine under the supervision of a doctor. There is good evidence that physician assistants could expand the care available in under-served areas, without compromising quality or safety, and at an affordable cost.

The proposals in this report only apply to the seven rural areas with the worst shortages of GP services. They can be in place within five years. In 2011-12, they would have resolved the worst shortages for just $30 million. The costs would mostly have been offset by fewer, or less costly, hospitalisations as a result of better population health.”

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Our Health, Our Community – Consumers Health Forum of Australia – Drugged by reality – losing $2,000 a minute and counting

Posted on September 24, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Our Health, Our Community – Consumers Health Forum of Australia – Drugged by reality – losing $2,000 a minute and counting 

The Consumers Health Forum has just launched a website containing information about the cost of generic drugs in Australia compared to other countries. Each day, Australians pay $3 million dollars more for these drugs than they would if they bought them in NZ or the UK. Unless the policy is changed, that $3 million will add up to $1 billion in lost savings by this time next year.

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Professional Standards for Homecare Services – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 9 September 2013

Posted on September 12, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

Professional Standards for Homecare Services – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 9 September 2013

These overarching developmental standards give a broad framework which will support teams providing and commissioning homecare services to improve services continually and to shape future services and pharmacy roles to deliver quality patient care. These standards will help patients experience a consistent quality of homecare services, irrespective of homecare provider, that will protect them from incidents of avoidable harm and help them to get the best outcomes from their medicines.”

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Professional standards for hospital pharmacy services; optimising patient outcomes from medicines – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 9 September 2013

Posted on September 12, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

Professional standards for hospital pharmacy services; optimising patient outcomes from medicines – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 9 September 2013

“From admission through to discharge, across multiple care pathways, and in a range of settings, (e.g. acute hospitals, in the community, homecare provision), patients access hospital pharmacy services.

To ensure that patients experience a consistent quality of hospital pharmacy services, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS) has defined ten overarching professional standards. These standards, (applicable across the full range of service providers in Great Britain) will help ensure patients are protected from incidents of avoidable harm and get the best outcomes from their medicines.

The ten overarching standards give:”

… continues on the site

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Ensuring a sustainable supply of pharmacy graduates: Proposals for consultation (first stage) – Higher Education Funding Council for England – September 2013

Posted on September 6, 2013. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Pharmacy, Workforce |

Ensuring a sustainable supply of pharmacy graduates: Proposals for consultation (first stage) – Higher Education Funding Council for England – September 2013

Proposal

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A strategic review of the future pharmacist workforce: informing pharmacy student intake – Centre for Workforce Intelligence [UK] – September 2013

Posted on September 6, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy, Workforce | Tags: , |

A strategic review of the future pharmacist workforce: informing pharmacy student intake – Centre for Workforce Intelligence [UK] – September 2013

“The Centre for Workforce Intelligence (CfWI) has published a review of the future supply and demand for the pharmacist workforce in England looking ahead to 2040.

The work, which was commissioned by the Department of Health, was set in the context of the ongoing rise in pharmacist student numbers (more than doubling from 1999 to 2009) and the Modernising Pharmacy Careers (MPC) Professional Board recommendation that the four-year pharmacy masters degree and pre-registration training year should be integrated into a single five-year course. It considers the risks of an oversupply of MPharm graduates compared with the demand for qualified pharmacists and supply of pre-registration placements.

Key findings include that it is likely that there will be a surplus supply of pharmacists in the future unless action is agreed in the short-term. In order to tackle this potential oversupply, the CfWI has issued a series of recommendations including:”

… continues on the site

More

Press release

 

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Patient self-monitoring of oral anticoagulation therapy: Advice Statement 007/12 – Healthcare Improvement Scotland – 11 July 2013

Posted on August 2, 2013. Filed under: Haematology, Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Patient self-monitoring of oral anticoagulation therapy: Advice Statement 007/12 – Healthcare Improvement Scotland – 11 July 2013

“Is patient self-monitoring (including self-testing and self-management) of oral anticoagulation therapy safe, efficacious and cost-effective?”

 

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ePrescribing joint statement – Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association – December 2012

Posted on May 29, 2013. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pharmacy |

ePrescribing joint statement – Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Pharmacists Association – December 2012

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Medicines Optimisation: Helping patients to make the most of medicines. Good practice guidance for healthcare professionals in England – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – May 2013

Posted on May 14, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

Medicines Optimisation: Helping patients to make the most of medicines. Good practice guidance for healthcare professionals in England – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – May 2013

News release 

“The Royal Pharmaceutical Society is calling on all care professionals to provide more help for patients with their medicines to improve outcomes and avoid medicines waste.

The Society has today published Medicines Optimisation: helping patients make the most of medicines, providing four guiding principles to help front-line professionals in England support patients to improve their quality of life and outcomes from better use of medicines.

Developed with health professionals, patients, lay representatives and patient groups, the principles are endorsed by NHS England, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Royal College of Nursing and the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry.

Sir Bruce Keogh, Medical Director of NHS England, said:
“This important document represents a collaboration between patients and the health professionals that care for them. It sets out four simple but important principles of “medicines optimisation” that could revolutionise medicines use and outcomes:

aim to understand the patient’s experience
make sure choice of medicine is made on the best available evidence
ensure medicines use is as safe as possible
make medicines optimisation part of routine practice

I would encourage everyone to adopt these principles whether prescribing, dispensing, administering or taking medicines.”

… continues on the site

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Adverse Drug Reaction-Related Hospitalizations Among Seniors, 2006 to 2011- Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 26 March 2013

Posted on March 27, 2013. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Adverse Drug Reaction-Related Hospitalizations Among Seniors, 2006 to 2011- Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 26 March 2013

This analysis examines hospital discharge data for seniors in all Canadian provinces and territories from 2006-2007 to 2010-2011 to provide an overview of the prevalence of hospitalizations related to adverse drug reactions ADRs. The relationship between various potential risk factors and the likelihood of being hospitalized for an ADR were examined for Alberta, Manitoba and P.E.I.

Media release: Seniors five times more likely to be hospitalized for adverse drug reactions

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Ending Australia’s bad drug deal: the three elements of pharmaceutical pricing reform – Grattan Institute – 17 March 2013

Posted on March 18, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Ending Australia’s bad drug deal: the three elements of pharmaceutical pricing reform – Grattan Institute – 17 March 2013

“Australia’s Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme pays at least $1.3 billion a year too much for prescription drugs. New Zealand, which has capped its budget and appointed independent experts to make decisions, pays a sixth as much as the PBS for the same drugs. This report proposes three ways Australia can regain its lost leadership in pharmaceutical pricing.”

ABC News report: Government ‘wasting millions’ on prescription drugs – 18 March 2013

Grattan report misses point on PBS reforms – Medicines Australia – 18 March 2013

“Patients would be worse off if Australia adopted a New Zealand-style access to medicines policy, Medicines Australia chief executive Dr Brendan Shaw said today.

Responding to a report on pharmaceutical prices published today by the Grattan Institute, Dr Shaw said proposals to cap spending on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme would limit patient’s access to medicines.

“If you want a how-to guide for turning your health system into that a third-word country, this report would be it,” Dr Shaw said.

“Capping the PBS would kill consumer access to new therapies as the experience in New Zealand proves.

“It undermines the fundamental principal of universal and affordable access to medicines that underpins the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme and has done for 60 years.

“Anyone who wants to emulate the New Zealand model of medicines policy should remember that New Zealanders have access to less than half the number of new medicines that Australians have and that New Zealand is stone motherless last in the OECD access to medicines rankings.

“So much so that when New Zealanders can’t access a variety of new medicines in their country they come over here.”

continues on the site

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Posted on February 14, 2013. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Countering the Problem of Falsified and Substandard Drugs – Institute of Medicine – 13 February 2013

“Falsified and substandard medicines provide little protection from disease and, worse, can expose consumers to major harm. Bad drugs pose potential threats around the world, but the nature of the risk varies by country, with higher risk in countries with minimal or non-existent regulatory oversight. While developed countries are not immune, – negligent production at a Massachusetts compounding pharmacy killed 44 people from September 2012 to January 2013 – the vast majority of problems occur in developing countries where underpowered and unsafe medicines affect millions.

It is difficult to measure the public health burden of falsified and substandard drugs, the number of deaths they cause, or the amount of time and money wasted using them. The FDA asked the IOM to assess the global public health implications of falsified, substandard, and counterfeit pharmaceuticals to help jumpstart international discourse about this problem. At the international level, productive discussion relies on cooperation and mutual trust. This report lays out a plan to invest in quality to improve public health.”

Full text

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Australian statistics on medicines 2011 – Therapeutic Goods Administration – 17 January 2013

Posted on January 21, 2013. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , , |

Australian statistics on medicines 2011 – Therapeutic Goods Administration – 17 January 2013

“Australian Statistics on Medicines is produced by the Drug Utilisation Sub-Committee (DUSC) of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Advisory Committee (PBAC) and is aimed at providing comprehensive and valid statistics on the Australian use of medicines in the public domain to allow access by all interested parties.

The report from the OPR includes a brief overview on the following aspects of post-market monitoring of medicines in Australia:

•Adverse event reporting statistics for 2011
•Processing and use of adverse event reports
•Reporting adverse events
•Expert advisory committee
•Medicines Safety Update
•Product vigilance”

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Improving the use of medicines for better outcomes and reduced waste: An Action Plan – Steering Group on Improving the Use of Medicines [UK] – October 2012

Posted on January 8, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy |

Improving the use of medicines for better outcomes and reduced waste: An Action Plan – Steering Group on Improving the Use of Medicines [UK] – October 2012

More from RightCare
“This Action plan aims to identify how people can be better supported in taking their medicines as prescribed, thus improving health outcomes, reducing waste and ensuring better value for the NHS.”

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Developing and updating local formularies: NICE good practice guidance – NICE – 14 December 2012

Posted on January 4, 2013. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

Developing and updating local formularies: NICE good practice guidance – NICE – 14 December 2012

“The purpose of this guidance is to provide good practice recommendations for the systems and processes needed to ensure NHS organisations develop and update local formularies effectively and in accordance with statutory requirements. This guidance is for people involved in handling, prescribing and commissioning medicines within the NHS, to support the development of local formularies that reflect local needs, reduce variation in prescribing, and allow rapid uptake of innovative medicines and treatments.”

… continues

Press release

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Bridging the gap: Why some people are not offered the medicines that NICE recommends – IMS Health – November 2012

Posted on December 4, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Bridging the gap: Why some people are not offered the medicines that NICE recommends – IMS Health – November 2012

by Peter Stephens

Extract from the Executive Summary:

“The extent of variation in the uptake of NICE recommended medicines across the NHS in England has been described before. The reasons for such variations are less well understood.

With the encouragement of the Metrics Oversight Group, a joint Department of Health, Industry and NHS group, IMS Health conducted a qualitative study during the summer and autumn of 2012 to help investigate the reasons for that variation.”

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Medication reconciliation in Canada – raising the bar – 2012

Posted on November 2, 2012. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy |

Medication reconciliation in Canada – raising the bar – 2012

Accreditation Canada, the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Canadian Patient Safety Institute, and the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada. (2012). Medication Reconciliation in Canada: Raising The Bar – Progress to date and the course ahead. Ottawa, ON: Accreditation Canada.

Extract

“Communicating effectively about medications is a critical component of delivering safe care. Without it, patients are at risk. By identifying and resolving medication discrepancies, the likelihood of adverse events occurring within health care organizations across the continuum of care will be reduced.

Using medication reconciliation, health care providers follow a formal process to work together with patients, families and care providers to ensure accurate and comprehensive medication1 information is communicated consistently across transitions of care. Medication reconciliation is a systematic and comprehensive review of all the medications a patient is taking to ensure that medications being added, changed or discontinued are carefully assessed and documented. Endorsed by patient safety organizations around the world, medication reconciliation is intended to ensure accurate communication at care transition points, for example, when patients enter a hospital, transition to another service or provider, or are discharged home.”

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Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy – AHRQ [US] – 5 October 2012

Posted on November 2, 2012. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy | Tags: , , |

Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy – AHRQ [US] – 5 October 2012

Full text

Soni NJ, Samson DJ, Galaydick JL, Vats V, Pitrak DL, Aronson N. Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Therapy. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 78. (Prepared by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10058-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 12(13)-EHC124-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. October 2012.

“Structured Abstract

Objectives. To systematically review comparative studies of the use of procalcitonin in the clinical management of adult and pediatric patients with suspected local or systemic infection.

Data sources. MEDLINE®, Embase®, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, National Institute for Clinical Excellence, the National Guideline Clearinghouse, and the Health Technology Assessment Programme were searched from January 1, 1990, to December 16, 2011; the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane searches were updated in December 2011. A search of the gray literature included databases with regulatory information, clinical trial registries, abstracts and conference papers, grants and federally funded research, and information from manufacturers.

Review methods. We sought studies that compared procalcitonin-guided versus clinical-criteria-guided initiation, discontinuation, or change of antibiotic therapy. Outcomes were antibiotic use, mortality, morbidity, and adverse drug events of antibiotic therapy. Data were abstracted by a single reviewer and fact-checked by a second reviewer. Study quality was assessed using the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force framework. A meta-analysis on short-term mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients was performed using a random-effects model. Strength of the body of evidence was assessed according to the AHRQ Methods Guide.

Results. There were 18 randomized, controlled trials that addressed five patient populations. Procalcitonin guidance reduces antibiotic use when used to discontinue antibiotics in adult ICU patients and to initiate or discontinue antibiotics in patients with respiratory tract infections (high evidence), without increasing morbidity (moderate evidence) and mortality (low evidence). In contrast, procalcitonin-guided intensification of antibiotics in adult ICU patients increases morbidity (moderate evidence). There is moderate evidence from a single good quality study that procalcitonin guidance reduces antibiotic use for suspected early neonatal sepsis, but insufficient evidence on morbidity and mortality outcomes was found. Evidence is insufficient to draw conclusions on outcomes of procalcitonin guidance for: (1) fever of unknown source in children 1–36 months of age; and (2) preemptive antibiotics after surgery.
Immunocompromised hosts and other special populations were generally excluded from procalcitonin guidance studies. Thus, findings from this review should not be extrapolated to patients with the following conditions: pregnancy; absolute neutropenia; immunocompromised states; chronic infections, and infections for which prolonged antibiotic therapy is standard of care (e.g., infective endocarditis).

Conclusions. Procalcitonin guidance reduces antibiotic use when used to discontinue antibiotics in adult ICU patients and to initiate or discontinue antibiotics in patients with respiratory tract infections. Populations for future research include immunocompromised patients, patients with other conditions (e.g., pregnancy, cystic fibrosis), and pediatric patients. Future research should compare procalcitonin guidance with antibiotic stewardship programs and to implementation of guidelines. Outcomes of high interest for future research are the consequences of reduction in antibiotic use for antibiotic resistance and for adverse events of antibiotic therapy.”

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The safer management of controlled drugs. Annual report 2011 – Care Quality Commission – July 2012

Posted on August 1, 2012. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

The safer management of controlled drugs. Annual report 2011 – Care Quality Commission – July 2012

Controlled drugs

“This section provides information about our role and the legal responsibilities of healthcare providers that handle controlled drugs.

You can also download the Self assessment tools for primary care trusts (PCTs) and acute NHS trusts or independent hospitals.”

…  continues

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Professional Standards for Hospital Pharmacy Services – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 31 July 2012

Posted on August 1, 2012. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Health Professions, Pharmacy, Workforce | Tags: |

Professional Standards for Hospital Pharmacy Services – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 31 July 2012

Supporting resources for Professional Standards for Hospital Pharmacy

Media release

“We are pleased to announce the launch of the RPS Professional Standards for Hospital Pharmacy Services: Optimising patient outcomes from medicines. The standards have been developed by a wide range of stakeholders across GB and covers pharmacy services delivered by acute, mental health, private and community service providers.

The 10 overarching standards underpin patient experience and the safe, effective management of medicines within and across organisations.  They will enable patients to experience a consistent quality of service within and across healthcare providers, that helps protect them from incidents of avoidable harm and enables them to get the best outcomes from their medicines.”

… continues

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WHO HIV drug resistance report 2012 – 18 July 2012

Posted on July 19, 2012. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

WHO HIV drug resistance report 2012 – 18 July 2012

ISBN: 978 92 4 150393 8

“Overview

This report assesses the general levels of transmitted and acquired drug resistance in select geographical areas of low- and middle-income countries. It is based on two distinct data sources: surveys performed to assess transmitted and acquired drug resistance using standardized WHO methods (WHO surveys) and a broad systematic review of the published literature on transmitted and acquired drug resistance. Findings from the monitoring of early warning indicators of HIV drug resistance are also presented and discussed. This report is organized as follows.”

… continues on the site

Media release: WHO: HIV drug resistance is present but can be managed

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Common medicines dictionary approved for NHS – 3 July 2012

Posted on July 4, 2012. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pharmacy |

Common medicines dictionary approved for NHS – 3 July 2012

“A common medicines dictionary, approved today, will reduce the chance of medical errors by ensuring all staff who work in the NHS and healthcare use the same common language when referring to medicines.

The Information Standards Board for Health and Social Care has approved the NHS dictionary of medicines and devices (dm+d) as a fundamental standard which must be used by all staff.

All doctors, nurses and pharmacists should move towards using the common medicines dictionary so that information exchanged electronically is accurate and safe. Using a single drug terminology will enable information about patients’ medicines to transfer more effectively between different healthcare settings, reducing the risk of medication mistakes caused by human error.

The NHS dictionary of medicines and devices is already widely used in the UK for the exchange of clinical information, including the Electronic Prescription Service and for patients’ Summary Care Records.

… continues on the site

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Keeping patients safe when they transfer between care providers – getting the medicines right. Final report – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – June 2012

Posted on June 20, 2012. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Keeping patients safe when they transfer between care providers – getting the medicines right. Final report – Royal Pharmaceutical Society – June 2012

Extract from the media release

“A new report published today by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society calls for improvements to the transfer of information about medicines when patients move between care settings.

Keeping patients safe when they transfer between care providers: Getting the medicines right outlines the results of a six-month project involving over 30 healthcare organisations which volunteered to implement RPS guidance on transfer of medicines information.  The guidance was endorsed by the Royal College of General Practitioners, the Royal College of Nursing, the Royal College of Physicians and the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and had a joint foreward from the Medical Director of the NHS, the Chief Nursing Officer and the Chief Pharmaceutical Officer.

The likelihood that an elderly medical patient will be discharged on the same medicines that they were admitted on is less than 10%[1]. Between 28-40% of medicines are discontinued during hospitalisation[2] and 45% of medicines prescribed at discharge are new medicines[3]. Around 60% of patients have 3 or more medicines changed during their hospital stay[4] and adverse drug events occur in up to 20% of patients after discharge.

“Getting the transfer of medicines information right can be challenging as patients follow complex pathways and systems vary between providers.  However, it’s totally unacceptable that poor transfer of medicines information continues to compromise patient care” said RPS Policy and Practice Lead Heidi Wright.

“Strategies must improve and the experiences of the volunteer sites in driving change in their organisations have created a set of recommendations which should be adopted across the NHS”.

The recommendations of the report are:”

… continues on the site

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EU launches site on adverse drug side effects – CMIO – 31 May 2012

Posted on June 5, 2012. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

EU launches site on adverse drug side effects – 31 May 2012

European Database of Suspected Adverse Drug Reaction Reports

“Physicians and patients who want to track the safety of pharmaceuticals in Europe have a new resource with the launch of a public website. Reports published on the site are derived from EudraVigilance, the drug safety database used by European Union (EU) regulators to monitor benefits and risks of a medicine once it has been approved.

The European Medicines Agency (EMA), which is publishing the reports, announced May 31 that it has begun offering reports on suspected adverse reactions to drugs as part of its effort to maintain transparency in EU regulatory processes.

Information on the website is presented in the form of a single report per medicine or active substance. Each report pulls together the total number of individual suspected side effect reports submitted to EudraVigilance by member states and marketing-authorization holders. The aggregated data can be viewed by age group, sex, type of suspected side effect and by outcome.

Adverse drug reactions include side effects from use of a medicine within the terms of the marketing authorization as well as from use outside the terms of the marketing authorization, including overdose, misuse, abuse and medication errors, and those associated with occupational exposure. Suspected side effects may not be related to or caused by the medicine, and as a result, the published information cannot be used to determine the likelihood of experiencing a side effect or as an indication that a medicine is harmful.

The initial round includes information published on approximately 650 medicines and active substances. According to the EMA, additional published reports of suspected adverse effects for common drug substances used in nationally authorized medicines will become available in the future.”

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Ensuring the Safety and Integrity of the World’s Drug, Vaccine, and Medicines Supply – Council on Foreign Relations – 14 May 2012

Posted on May 21, 2012. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Ensuring the Safety and Integrity of the World’s Drug, Vaccine, and Medicines Supply – Council on Foreign Relations – 14 May 2012

Policy Innovation Memorandum No. 21

“The world is facing two immediate health crises concerning drugs and vaccines: affordable and reliable access to life-sparing medicines and the safety and reliability of those medicines. Regulation and distribution systems to ensure access and protect public safety, where they exist, are outdated. And over the past decade all aspects of raw materials extraction, ingredients synthesis, formulation, packaging, and distribution have globalized to such an extent that nearly every pill, injection, and salve contains elements derived from multiple countries. The supply chain of production is compromised: hundreds of thousands of people are dying annually from false, poisonous, or substandard medicines. Unless this issue is addressed, millions more lives and the credibility of medicines and vaccines will be lost. The Groups of Eight (G8) and Twenty (G20) countries should take the lead, as a matter of urgency, in promoting cooperation among national safety regulators, tougher legal frameworks, and regional networks of surveillance and prosecution.”

… continues on the site

Media on this – Drug Safety Crisis – ABC RN – 19 May 2012

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Advanced Pharmacy Practice Consultation – National Alliance for Pharmacy Education (NAPE) response – 16 May 2012

Posted on May 17, 2012. Filed under: Pharmacy, Workforce |

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Consultation – National Alliance for Pharmacy Education (NAPE) response – 16 May 2012

NAPE supports Advanced Practice

Pharmaceutical Society of Australia

“The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Framework Steering Committee has released a Consultation Paper on Advanced Pharmacy Practice and is seeking feedback from members of the pharmacy profession in Australia.

This initiative is directed at defining and recognising advanced pharmacy practice in Australia and may help form the basis for the further development of the profession and of the professional roles performed.”

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Report of the All Party Pharmacy Group (APPG) inquiry into medicines shortages [UK] – 15 May 2012

Posted on May 16, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Report of the All Party Pharmacy Group (APPG) inquiry into medicines shortages [UK] – 15 May 2012

Chair: Rt Hon Kevin Barron MP
Vice Chairs: Baroness Cumberlege CBE DL & Oliver Colvile MP
Treasurer: Margot James MP
Secretary: Stephen Lloyd MP

Extract from the executive summary:

“UK has been experiencing shortages of NHS prescription medicines for four years. These shortages are caused principally by the export of medicines intended for the UK market to other EU countries. This exporting is conducted by speculators and is legal under EU, and therefore UK, law.

We have no objection to the export of medicines in principal, so long as this practice does not harm patients. However, throughout this inquiry we have seen evidence that patients are suffering and that pharmacists’ time and resources is being diverted away from patient care as a result of medicines being in short supply.

Pharmacists have no choice but to divert resources away from clinical and public health services for patients in order to dedicate time to sourcing medicines in shortage. Where pharmacists are able to source a medicine in the face of a shortage, as they often do, they prevent patients being inconvenienced or harmed. Being able to trade medicines between pharmacies on a low level is crucial to their ability to continue doing this. We therefore support the continuation of the “5% trading rule” or a similar arrangement. Were it not for the efforts of pharmacists, the problem would be even worse. But sourcing products in short supply is not the best use of these highly-qualified health professionals’ time.

Despite the best efforts of many pharmacists, medicine shortages are having an adverse impact on patients. We have been told of various cases involving vulnerable patients not receiving the medicine they need. This has included patients with: mental health problems; epilepsy sufferers; diabetics; and even pregnant women in need of medicine to stabilise their pregnancy. Evidence we received highlights the stress, anxiety and sometimes harm that patients suffer.”

… continues

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Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 3 May 2012

Posted on May 4, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 3 May 2012

“Drug spending continues to increase in Canada; overall annual growth has slowed to its lowest rate in 15 years.

Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2011 updates trends in drug spending in Canada, primarily from retail establishments, in total, by public and private payers, and by type of drug (prescribed and non-prescribed). Provincial/territorial and international comparisons are included.”

Media release

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Facing the Reality of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Challenges and Potential Solutions in India – Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the Indian National Science Academy, and the Indian Council of Medical Research – IOM – 27 April 2012

Posted on April 30, 2012. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Facing the Reality of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Challenges and Potential Solutions in India – Summary of a Joint Workshop by the Institute of Medicine, the Indian National Science Academy, and the Indian Council of Medical Research – IOM – 27 April 2012

“An estimated 8.8 million people fell ill with tuberculosis (TB) in 2010 and 1.4 million died from the disease. Although antibiotics to treat TB were developed in the 1950s and are effective against a majority of TB cases, resistance to these antibiotics has emerged over the years, resulting in the growing spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. Due to challenges in timely and accurate diagnosis of drug-resistant TB, length and tolerability of treatment regimens, and expense of second-line anti-TB drugs, effectively controlling the disease requires complex public health interventions.

The IOM Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation held three international workshops to gather information from local experts around the world on the threat of drug resistant TB and how the challenges it presents can be met. Workshops were held in South Africa and Russia in 2010. The third workshop was held April 18-19, 2011, in New Delhi, India, in collaboration with the Indian National Science Academy and the Indian Council of Medical Research. The aim of the workshop was to highlight key challenges to controlling the spread of drug-resistant strains of TB in India and to discuss strategies for advancing and integrating local and international efforts to prevent and treat drug-resistant TB. This document summarizes the workshop.”

Full text

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Envisioning a Transformed Clinical Trials Enterprise in the United States: Establishing an Agenda for 2020 – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 13 April 2012

Posted on April 16, 2012. Filed under: Pharmacy, Research | Tags: |

Envisioning a Transformed Clinical Trials Enterprise in the United States: Establishing an Agenda for 2020 – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 13 April 2012

full text

“There is growing recognition that the United States’ clinical trials enterprise (CTE) faces great challenges. There is a gap between what is desired – where medical care is provided solely based on high quality evidence – and the reality – where there is limited capacity to generate timely and practical evidence for drug development and to support medical treatment decisions.

With the need for transforming the CTE in the U.S. becoming more pressing, the IOM Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation held a two-day workshop in November 2011, bringing together leaders in research and health care. The workshop focused on how to transform the CTE, and discussed a vision to make the enterprise more efficient, effective, and fully integrated into the health care system. Key issue areas addressed at the workshop included: the development of a robust clinical trials workforce, the alignment of cultural and financial incentives for clinical trials, and the creation of a sustainable infrastructure to support a transformed CTE. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Guidance on collaboration between healthcare professionals and the pharmaceutical industry [UK] – 29 March 2012

Posted on March 30, 2012. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Guidance on collaboration between healthcare professionals and the pharmaceutical industry. Ethics, transparency, partnership – jointly produced by senior representatives of the pharmaceutical industry and the healthcare community – 29 March 2012

Media release 

“Healthcare leaders from across the UK have today published a new set of guidelines to promote positive collaboration between health organisations and the pharmaceutical industry and help guide their working practices and interaction. The statement of best practice was signed by 18 healthcare organisations, including the Department of Health, the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government.

The publication comes as collaborative working becomes an increasingly important way for the NHS to address key health challenges in a constrained budgetary environment.

The guidance has been formulated by the Ethical Standards in Health and Life Sciences Group (ESHLSG) which is comprised of leading figures from the professional, representative and regulatory bodies from the health professional community and life sciences industry. The Group was established to address issues in partnership which impact on the relationship between commercial organisations and health professionals and ensures that these relationships meet the high expectations of stakeholders, and particularly patients.

Specifically the statement:

• Acknowledges that active collaboration can deliver better patient care and improved outcomes.

• Clearly describes the current working environment in which pharmaceutical companies and health care professionals operate and the rules and regulations to which all parties must abide.

• Details in a “Dos and Don’ts” section, every day, practical advice for those working in collaboration to improve patient outcomes.”

… continues

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Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery – Research Review – AHRQ – 13 March 2012

Posted on March 29, 2012. Filed under: Orthopaedics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis in Orthopedic Surgery – Research Review – AHRQ – 13 March 2012

AHRQ = Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Effective Health Care Program, Comparative Effectiveness Review Number 49

“Objectives. This is an evidence report prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) examining the comparative efficacy and safety of prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in major orthopedic surgery (total hip replacement [THR], total knee replacement [TKR], and hip fracture surgery [HFS]) and other nonmajor orthopedic surgeries (knee arthroscopy, injuries distal to the hip requiring surgery, and elective spine surgery).”

… continues

Sobieraj DM, Coleman CI, Tongbram V, Lee S, Colby J, Chen WT, Makanji SS, Ashaye A, Kluger J, White CM. Venous Thromboembolism in Orthopedic Surgery. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 49. (Prepared by the University of Connecticut/Hartford Hospital Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-10067-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 12-EHC020-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. March 2012. http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/reports/final.cfm.

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The evolving threat of antimicrobial resistance – options for action – World Health Organization – 8 March 2012

Posted on March 9, 2012. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

The evolving threat of antimicrobial resistance – options for action – World Health Organization – 8 March 2012

ISBN 978 92 4 150318 1

“This publication has been produced by the WHO Patient Safety Programme as part of its solid commitment to promoting safer care worldwide. It is the result of an international consultation process started in 2008, which gathered input from over 50 international experts in the field of antimicrobial resistance.”

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Safe and Effective Medicines for Children: Pediatric Studies Conducted Under BPCA and PREA – IOM – 29 February 2012

Posted on March 1, 2012. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Safe and Effective Medicines for Children: Pediatric Studies Conducted Under BPCA and PREA – IOM – 29 February 2012

full text   Institute of Medicine

“Until 1997, most drugs used to treat children were tested for safety and effectiveness only in adults. It was then that Congress and the FDA created policies – including what are now the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) and the Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) – to encourage more pediatric studies of drugs used for children. The FDA asked the IOM to review aspects of pediatric studies and changes in product labeling that resulted from BPCA and PREA and their predecessor policies, as well as to assess the incentives for pediatric studies of biologics – drugs derived from human or animal sources, or microorganisms – and the extent to which biologics have been studied in children.

The IOM committee concludes that policies included in BPCA and PREA have helped provide clinicians who care for children with better information about the efficacy, safety, and appropriate prescribing of drugs. The IOM suggests that more can be done to increase knowledge about drugs used by children and thereby improve the clinical care, health, and well-being of the nation’s children.”

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Twenty years of using economic evaluations for reimbursement decisions. What have we achieved? – Centre for Health Economics, University of York – 2012

Posted on February 13, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Twenty years of using economic evaluations for reimbursement decisions. What have we achieved? – Centre for Health Economics, University of York –  2012

by Michael Drummond

Abstract
“The objective of this paper is to examine the impact of economic evaluation on the reimbursement process for pharmaceuticals. Before the introduction of economic evaluation, a range of arrangements existed across different jurisdictions, varying from reimbursement based on clinical criteria alone and price controls, to a total absence of controls over price or reimbursement. The changes in the structure of reimbursement policies necessary to incorporate economic  evaluation have been accomplished without major difficulty in most jurisdictions. However, several methodological differences in international guidelines for economic evaluation exist, only some of which can easily be justified. A number of beneficial changes in reimbursement processes have also been observed, such as a trend towards requiring the measurement of more meaningful clinical endpoints and increased engagement between manufacturers, drug regulators and payers. A consistent finding in studies of reimbursement decisions is that economic considerations have been influential, second only to the strength of the clinical evidence for the drug of interest. The impact of economic evaluation on the allocation of healthcare resources is hard to ascertain because of the difficulties in specifying the counterfactual and the fact that little is known about the extent to which reimbursement decisions actually lead to changes in healthcare practice. However, there is evidence that economic evaluation has assisted price negotiations and enabled reimbursement agencies to target drugs to those patients who will benefit the most. In publicly financed healthcare systems, an evidence-based system of pricing and reimbursement for drugs, considering societal willingness-topay, is a reasonable policy objective to pursue.”

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Effects of Two Commercial Electronic Prescribing Systems on Prescribing Error Rates in Hospital In-Patients: A Before and After Study – PLoS Med 2012

Posted on February 2, 2012. Filed under: Health Informatics, Patient Safety, Pharmacy |

Effects of Two Commercial Electronic Prescribing Systems on Prescribing Error Rates in Hospital In-Patients: A Before and After Study
Westbrook JI, Reckmann M, Li L, Runciman WB, Burke R, et al
PLoS Med 2012  9(1): e1001164.

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Antibiotics. FDA Needs to Do More to Ensure That Drug Labels Contain Up-to-Date Information – GAO – January 2012

Posted on February 2, 2012. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , , |

Antibiotics. FDA Needs to Do More to Ensure That Drug Labels Contain Up-to-Date Information – GAO – January 2012

“What GAO Found

FDA has not taken sufficient steps to ensure that antibiotic labels contain up-to-date breakpoints. FDA designates certain drugs as “reference-listed drugs” and the sponsors of these drugs play an important role in ensuring the accuracy of drug labels. Reference-listed drugs are approved drug products to which generic versions are compared. As of November 2011, FDA had not yet confirmed whether the breakpoints on the majority of reference-listed antibiotics labels were up to date. FDA contacted sponsors of 210 antibiotics in early 2008 to remind sponsors of the importance of maintaining their labels and requested that they assess whether the breakpoints on their drugs’ labels were up to date. Sponsors were asked to submit evidence to FDA showing that the breakpoints were either current or needed revision. As of November 2011, over 3.5 years after FDA contacted sponsors, the agency had not yet confirmed whether the breakpoints on the labels of 70 percent, or 146 of the 210 antibiotics, were up to date.”  … continues

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Medications at Transitions and Clinical Handoffs (MATCH) Toolkit for Medication Reconciliation – AHRQ – December 2011

Posted on December 12, 2011. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Medications at Transitions and Clinical Handoffs (MATCH) Toolkit for Medication Reconciliation – AHRQ – December 2011

AHRQ = Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

“Medication reconciliation is a complex process that impacts all patients as they move through all health care settings. The process involves comparison of a patient’s current medication regimen against a physician’s admission, transfer, or discharge orders to identify discrepancies. Study data show that an effective process can detect and avert most medication discrepancies, potentially avoiding a large number of adverse drug events and related costs for care of affected patients.

This toolkit is based on the Medications at Transitions and Clinical Handoffs (MATCH) Web site. MATCH was developed by Gary Noskin, M.D., and Kristine Gleason, R.Ph., of Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago, Illinois, through the support of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Grant No. 5 U18 HS015886 and collaboration between Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and The Joint Commission.

This toolkit incorporates the experiences and lessons learned by health care facilities that have implemented the MATCH strategies to improve their medication reconciliation processes.”

 

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Which Price is Right? Regulating the cost of pharmaceuticals in Europe and North America – Stockholm Network – December 2011

Posted on December 9, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Which Price is Right? Regulating the cost of pharmaceuticals in Europe and North America – Stockholm Network – December 2011

by Paul Healy

“This is the latest publication of the Stockholm Network`s newest programme on Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and pharmaceutical pricing. Which Price is Right? is an extensive study into the regulations around the price of pharmaceuticals in Europe and North America, identifying a pricing spectrum that balances between controlled prices set by healthcare payers and market-based prices set by manufacturers.

It argues that Europe currently finds itself in a position where it is getting “more for less” in regards to pharmaceuticals, although in doing so it relies on more market-based environments, such as the United States, to progress the research into much needed innovations. Although it may not seem so initially to policymakers, this is ultimately identified as problematic for two reasons.

Firstly, it puts European nations in a position where they can be accused of “free-riding” on patients in the US and thus not paying their fair share towards the current cost of developing medicines that are of value to the entire globe, not least to their own patients. Secondly, it means that European nations have surrendered some autonomy over their healthcare systems by placing the burden for medical innovation on the shoulders of others, whilst leaving themselves susceptible to changes in pharmaceuticals regulations over which they have no authority.”

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Strength and opportunity 2011: the landscape of medical technology, medical biotechnology, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors in the UK – BIS – 5 December 2011

Posted on December 9, 2011. Filed under: Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy, Research |

Strength and opportunity 2011: the landscape of medical technology, medical biotechnology, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors in the UK – BIS – 5 December 2011

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Involvement, Shared Decision-Making and Medicines – The Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 30 November 2011

Posted on December 9, 2011. Filed under: Patient Participation, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Involvement, Shared Decision-Making and Medicines – The Royal Pharmaceutical Society – 30 November 2011

by Professor Alan Cribb

“The report focuses on a long neglected but much discussed driver of quality in healthcare: joint decision-making between professionals and patients.

There is an increasing emphasis on more partnership working between clinicians and patients and shared decision-making about treatment choices, rather than merely choices about such things as treatment venue. This is needed for reasons of both effectiveness and ethics.”

 

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TGA reforms: a blueprint for TGA’s future – 8 December 2011

Posted on December 8, 2011. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy | Tags: |

TGA reforms: a blueprint for TGA’s future – 8 December 2011

“The Australian Government has released its response to several major reviews of therapeutic goods regulation that have been undertaken over the past 18 months.

These reviews include:

•the review to improve the transparency of the Therapeutic Goods Administration
•public consultations on the regulatory framework for advertising therapeutic goods
•the Auditor-General’s report on Therapeutic Goods Regulation: Complementary Medicines
•an informal working group examining the regulation of complementary medicines and reasons for low compliance rates
•public consultations on the medical devices regulatory framework
•the Working Group on Promotion of Therapeutic Products
•the Health Technology Assessment Review.

The Government’s response takes into account submissions made by stakeholders, and draws this work together into a comprehensive package of reforms that will be progressed in stages.

The reforms will enhance the regulatory framework, ensuring that it remains adaptable to new scientific developments and emerging community expectations.

They will also improve the Australian community’s understanding of the TGA’s regulatory processes and decisions and enhance public trust in the safety and quality of therapeutic goods.”

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European strategic action plan on antibiotic resistance 2011-2016 – WHO Regional Committee for Europe

Posted on November 22, 2011. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy |

European strategic action plan on antibiotic resistance 2011-2016 – WHO REgional Committee for Europe

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Antimicrobial stewardship: Start smart – then focus – Department of Health [UK] – 17 November 2011

Posted on November 22, 2011. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pharmacy |

Antimicrobial stewardship: Start smart – then focus – Department of Health [UK] – 17 November 2011
 
“The aim of this guidance is to provide an outline of evidence-based antimicrobial stewardship in the secondary healthcare setting. Following this Guidance will help organisations to demonstrate compliance with Criterion 9 of The Health and Social Care Act 2008: Code of Practice on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance.”

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Market entry by means of pharmaceutical needs assessments and quality and performance (market exit) – NHS – 31 October 2011

Posted on November 2, 2011. Filed under: Pharmacy |

Market entry by means of pharmaceutical needs assessments and quality and performance (market exit) – NHS – 31 October 2011

Creator/s: Department of Health

“The NHS Act 2006 requires the Secretary of State for Health to make Regulations concerning the provision of NHS pharmaceutical services in England.

The Health Act 2009 amended these provisions by providing that

  • PCTs must develop and publish local pharmaceutical needs assessments (known as “PNAs”); and
  • PCTs would then use their PNAs as the basis for determining entry to the NHS pharmaceutical services market.

The Health Act 2009 also introduced new provisions which allow the Secretary of State to make regulations about what remedial actions PCTs can take against pharmacy and dispensing appliance contractors who breach their terms of service or whose performance is poor or below standard.

The first set of Regulations dealing with the development and publication of PNAs, the NHS (Pharmaceutical Services and Local Pharmaceutical Services)(Amendment) Regulations 2010 (S.I. 2010/914) were laid on 26 March 2010 and came into force on 24 May 2010.

These new draft regulations – The National Health Service (Pharmaceutical Services) Regulations 2012 (“the 2012 Regulations”) and draft guidance concern the remaining provision under the Health Act 2009.

As part of this consultation, the Department welcomes comments and views from all interested parties.”

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Clinical trials – postnote form the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, Houses of Parliament [England] – October 2011

Posted on October 18, 2011. Filed under: Pharmacy, Research | Tags: |

 

Clinical trials – postnote form the Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology, Houses of Parliament [England] – October 2011

 

“Clinical trials benefit the health and safety of patients by making proven new treatments available more quickly. This industry is also very important for the UK economy. However, recent years have seen a drop in the number of trials held in the UK. This POSTnote summarises some of the most important reasons behind this decline, and the actions being taken to improve the situation. It also highlights areas identified by key industry partners as opportunities for growth.”

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Public Engagement and Clinical Trials: New Models and Disruptive Technologies – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 14 October 2011

Posted on October 17, 2011. Filed under: Pharmacy, Research | Tags: , , |

Public Engagement and Clinical Trials: New Models and Disruptive Technologies – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 14 October 2011

“Clinical trials provide essential information needed to turn basic medical research findings into patient treatments. New treatments must be studied in large numbers of humans to determine whether they are effective and to assess any harm that may arise from treatment. There is growing recognition, however, that the U.S. clinical trials enterprise is unable to keep pace with the national demand for research results. Many clinical trials never meet their recruitment goals and others accrue patients far too slowly. The divide between clinical research and clinical care is growing wider, with many patients and their physicians far removed from the clinical trials that are needed to create the data necessary to bring scientific discoveries into clinical practice.

To further examine the current challenges to U.S. clinical trials, the IOM Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation, in collaboration with the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, held a workshop June 27-28, 2011 to engage stakeholders and experts in a discussion about possible solutions to improve public engagement in clinical trials. The workshop covered topics such as recruiting and retaining trial participants, increasing practicing clinicians’ participation in and referrals to trials, and strengthening public understanding of clinical trials. This document is a summary of the workshop.”

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N=1: Why people matter in medicine – Royal College of Physicians – 27 September 2011

Posted on September 28, 2011. Filed under: Patient Participation, Pharmacy | Tags: |

N=1: Why people matter in medicine – Royal College of Physicians – 27 September 2011

“A new report has outlined the need to bridge the gap between patients and the medical industry for a more beneficial, effective system of prescribing.

N=1: Why people matter in medicine has been published by a subgroup of the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) Medicines Forum and highlights the part that patient understanding and belief plays in determining whether or not a medicine is taken as advised, or even taken at all.

The report, based on consultations held over a period of 11 months with representatives of patient groups, specialists and views of the RCP’s patient and carer network, makes particular reference to the need for healthcare professionals to use ‘patient terms’ and real life language. The authors note that ‘conversations need to be derived from what the public wants and needs to know about medicines and their effects – not from what professionals want to tell them.’

The report highlights that there is often uncertainty about what is available to the public in terms of life-changing therapeutic products and what modern medicine is actually able to offer.

A key recommendation of the report is that GPs should be able to refer patients with medication problems to a pharmacist adviser who can also be used as a source of advice for both patients and GPs on medication related issues.

Other practical recommendations in the report focus on more effective engagement, service improvement and improving research for the benefit of the public.”

… continues on the site

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Therapeutic Goods Regulation: Complementary Medicines – Australian National Audit Office – 30 August 2011

Posted on August 31, 2011. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Pharmacy |

Therapeutic Goods Regulation: Complementary Medicines – Australian National Audit Office – 30 August 2011

The Auditor-General Audit Report No.3 2011–12

ISSN 1036–7632
ISBN 0 642 81207 1

“The objective of this audit is to examine the effectiveness of the TGA’s administration of complementary  medicines regulation in Australia. The primary focus is on listed complementary medicines, which comprise about
98 per cent of these medicines.”

ABC News report on the publication

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Standards for the design of hospital in-patient prescription charts – Academy of Medical Royal Colleges / Royal College of Nursing – 8 August 2011

Posted on August 10, 2011. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Standards for the design of hospital in-patient prescription charts – Academy of Medical Royal Colleges / Royal College of Nursing – 8 August 2011

A report prepared for Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS Medical Director, from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges in collaboration with the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and Royal College of Nursing

“A new report has defined the standards guiding the design of prescription charts. It is hoped the standards will be used by hospitals to benchmark local charts.

The report, jointly published by the RCN, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and commissioned by the Department of Health, is part of a range of high level multidisciplinary initiatives that inform the medicines safety and safe prescribing agenda.

The standards can also be used to inform the development of a national UK prescription chart; a move supported by the RCN, a number of medical royal colleges and the Royal Pharmaceutical Society.”

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The safer management of controlled drugs – Annual report 2010 – Care Quality Commission [UK] – August 2011

Posted on August 8, 2011. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

The safer management of controlled drugs – Annual report 2010 – Care Quality Commission [UK] – August 2011

“Annual report published in August 2011 which made recommendations on how chief executives and accountable officers could better aid the safer management of controlled drugs.”

 

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National Tall Man Lettering – Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – 1 July 2011

Posted on August 4, 2011. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

National Tall Man Lettering – Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – 1 July 2011
 
“The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care has developed the National Tall Man Lettering List to reduce the risk of drug selection error. It is intended for use in Australian health services and for incorporation into electronic health initiatives and standards.
 
The National Tall Man Lettering List (PDF 196 KB) has been compiled to include those look-alike, sound-alike names that have been predicted to pose the greatest risks to patient safety. The overall risk rating is a combination of measures that estimate the likelihood that the medicines names and associated products will be confused and the overall patient harm that may occur if this confusion occurred.”

… continues

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Keeping patients safe when they transfer between care providers – Academy of Medical Royal Colleges – July 2011

Posted on August 4, 2011. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Keeping patients safe when they transfer between care providers – Professional Guidance – Academy of Medical Royal Colleges – 12 July 2011

“Research has shown time and again that there is a significant risk that patients’ medicines will be unintentionally altered when they move care providers. The NHS outcomes framework has already recognised the significance of this to patient safety. All NHS providers, and commissioners of those services, are now charged with reducing harm to patients caused through medication errors.

Having safe systems in place for managing information and supply of medicines across care providers is also seen as central to safe, high quality care by the Care Quality Commission.

The development of this guidance was led by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, in collaboration with other royal colleges, patients, health and social care professionals, and is closely mapped to a range of related national initiatives and guidance. It gives organisations tools to develop their systems, and to help effect the culture change necessary in their organisations to raise this important patient safety issue higher up everyone’s agenda.”

Help get the Right Medicines when you Move care providers – Academy of Medical Royal Colleges – 11 July 2011

Keeping patients safe when they transfer between care providers – Organisational Guidance – Academy of Medical Royal Colleges – 11 July 2011

“Research has shown time and again that there is a significant risk that patients’ medicines will be unintentionally altered when they move care providers. The NHS outcomes framework has already recognised the significance of this to patient safety. All NHS providers, and commissioners of those services, are now charged with reducing harm to patients caused through medication errors.

Having safe systems in place for managing information and supply of medicines across care providers is also seen as central to safe, high quality care by the Care Quality Commission.

The development of this guidance was led by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, in collaboration with other royal colleges, patients, health and social care professionals, and is closely mapped to a range of related national initiatives and guidance. It gives organisations tools to develop their systems, and to help effect the culture change necessary in their organisations to raise this important patient safety issue higher up everyone’s agenda.”

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Review to improve the transparency of the Therapeutic Goods Administration: Final Report – June 2011

Posted on July 22, 2011. Filed under: Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Review to improve the transparency of the Therapeutic Goods Administration: Final Report – June 2011

Extract from the Executive Summary:

“The Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 states as its principal object ‘to provide for the establishment and maintenance of a national system of controls relating to the quality, safety, efficacy and timely availability of therapeutic goods’ that are used in Australia or exported from Australia. This system is achieved through the operation of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), a Division of the Department of Health and Ageing.

A perception has arisen in the community that the TGA does not provide the public with sufficient information about its activities and about the therapeutic goods that it regulates. This perception led the Parliamentary Secretary for Health and Ageing, the Hon Catherine King MP, to establish a panel of consumer, health practitioners and therapeutic goods industry representatives to review and report on the transparency of the TGA.”

ISBN: 978-1-74241-523-9
Online ISBN: 978-1-74241-524-6
Publications Approval Number-D0482

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Making care safer: Improving medication safety for people in care homes: thoughts and experiences from carers and relatives – The Health Foundation – June 2011

Posted on July 7, 2011. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Making care safer: Improving medication safety for people in care homes: thoughts and experiences from carers and relatives – The Health Foundation – June 2011

“This report collects together the testimony given by family and carers of people living in a care home, specifically around issues of medication safety. Three day-long focus groups were held in 2010, in Manchester, Birmingham and London. In total 26 people attended the events. Members of the group also shared testimony they had collected from fellow carers.

During the focus groups, attendees were invited to tell their stories and think about ways to improve medication safety in care homes. They were asked to consider what improvements would be possible in practice given the current culture and constraints, and what could be done strategically in the longer term.

The issues and potential solutions raised by the groups are presented in this report under four main headings:

•communication and information sharing
•prescribing and administration of medication
•staff development and support
•advocacy and rights.”

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Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems – JAMIA 2011

Posted on July 1, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Patient Safety, Pharmacy |

Errors associated with outpatient computerized prescribing systems
Karen C Nanji  et al
JAMIA doi:10.1136/amiajnl-2011-000205 
 
“Objective To report the frequency, types, and causes of errors associated with outpatient computer-generated prescriptions, and to develop a framework to classify these errors to determine which strategies have greatest potential for preventing them. ”  abstract continues online

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Medicines Care Guides For Residential Aged Care – NZ Ministry of Health – May 2011

Posted on June 29, 2011. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Pharmacy |

Medicines Care Guides For Residential Aged Care – NZ Ministry of Health – May 2011
ISBN numbers: 978-0-478-37438-4 (Print), 978-0-478-37441-4 (Online)
HP number: 5302

“Summary of publication
The aim of the Medicines Care Guides is to provide a quick medicine management reference tool for all care staff working in residential aged care in New Zealand.

Guidance is provided for key medicine safety topics relevant to the care of older adults. This guidance is based on current legislation, best available evidence and published guidelines, and is consistent with the New Zealand medicines strategy, Actioning Medicine in New Zealand (Associate Minister of Health and Minister of Health 2010).”

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Evaluation of nurse and pharmacist independent prescribing in England – key findings and executive summary – 11 May 2011

Posted on May 20, 2011. Filed under: Nursing, Pharmacy |

Evaluation of nurse and pharmacist independent prescribing in England – key findings and executive summary – 11 May 2011

“This is an independent report commissioned and funded by the Policy Research Programme in the Department of Health. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the Department.

The study carried out in England by the Universities of Southampton and Keele evaluates nurse and pharmacist independent prescribing in order to inform planning for current and future prescribers.

The report concludes that nurse and pharmacist independent prescribing is becoming a well-integrated and established means of managing patients’ conditions and providing them with the medicines they need. The research also reports that Nurse and Pharmacist Independent Prescribers are operating safely and prescribing appropriately and that there are high levels of satisfaction among patients being treated by them.”  … continues

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A Risk-Characterization Framework for Decision-Making at the Food and Drug Administration – National Academies Press – 2011

Posted on May 10, 2011. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: , |

A Risk-Characterization Framework for Decision-Making at the Food and Drug Administration – National Academies Press – 2011

Authors: Committee on Ranking FDA Product Categories Based on Health Consequences, Phase II; National Research Council

ISBN-10: 0-309-21280-4
ISBN-13: 978-0-309-21280-9

“This report, prepared by the Committee on Ranking FDA Product Categories Based on Health Consequences, Phase II, in response to the request from FDA and DHHS, describes a risk characterization framework that can be used to evaluate and compare the public-health consequences of different decisions concerning a wide variety of products.”

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Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2010 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 5 May 2011

Posted on May 6, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Growth in drug spending slows to lowest rate since 1996 – Canada
Patent expiries and generic pricing policies may be factors in slower growth

Download the report: Drug Expenditure in Canada, 1985 to 2010

“Although drugs remain an important cost driver in Canada’s health system, growth in spending has slowed to its lowest rate in 14 years, according to a new report released today by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). Total drug expenditure is estimated to have reached $31.1 billion in 2010, an increase of $1.4 billion, or 4.8% since 2009. In comparison, the average annual growth rate in drug spending was nearly twice as high between 2000 and 2005, at 8.9%.”  … continues on the site

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Medication Management & Health IT – AHRQ – April 2011

Posted on May 6, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Medications, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

Medication Management & Health IT – AHRQ – April 2011

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

“Structured Abstract
Objective: The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research.

Data sources: We searched peer-reviewed electronic databases, grey literature, and performed hand searches. Databases searched included MEDLINE®, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Compendex, Inspec (which includes IEEE Xplore), Library and Information Science Abstracts, E-Prints in Library and Information Science, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Business Source Complete. Grey literature searching involved Internet searching, reviewing relevant Web sites, and searching electronic databases of grey literatures. AHRQ also provided all references in their e-Prescribing, bar coding, and CPOE knowledge libraries.

Methods: Paired reviewers looked at citations to identify studies on a range of health IT used to assist in the medication management process (MMIT) during multiple levels of screening (titles and abstracts, full text and final review for assignment of questions and data abstrction). Randomized controlled trials and cohort, case-control, and case series studies were independently assessed for quality. All data were abstracted by one reviewer and examined by one of two different reviewers with content and methods expertise.

Results: 40,582 articles were retrieved. After duplicates were removed, 32,785 articles were screened at the title and abstract phase. 4,578 full text articles were assessed and 789 articles were included in the final report. Of these, 361 met only content criteria and were listed without further abstraction. The final report included data from 428 articles across the seven key questions. Study quality varied according to phase of medication management. Substantially more studies, and studies with stronger comparative methods, evaluated prescribing and monitoring. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) and computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems were studied more than any other application of MMIT. Physicians were more often the subject of evaluation than other participants. Other health care professionals, patients, and families are important but not studied as thoroughly as physicians. These nonphysicians groups often value different aspects of MMIT, have diverse needs, and use systems differently. Hospitals and ambulatory clinics were well-represented in the literature with less emphasis placed on long-term care facilities, communities, homes, and nonhospital pharmacies. Most studies evaluated changes in process and outcomes of use, usability, and knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Most showed moderate to substantial improvement with implementation of MMIT. Economics studies and those with clinical outcomes were less frequently studied. Those articles that did address economics and clinical outcomes often showed equivocal findings on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MMIT systems. Qualitative studies provided evidence of strong perceptions, both positive and negative, of the effects of MMIT and unintended consequences. We found little data on the effects of forms of medications, conformity, standards, and open source status. Much descriptive literature discusses implementation issues but little strong evidence exists. Interest is strong in MMIT and more groups and institutions will implement systems in the next decades, especially with the Federal Government’s push toward more health IT to support better and more cost-effective health care.

Conclusions: MMIT is well-studied, although on closer examination of the literature the evidence is not uniform across phases of medication management, groups of people involved, or types of MMIT. MMIT holds the promise of improved processes; clinical and economics studies and the understanding of sustainability issues are lacking.”

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Physician Practices, E-Prescribing and Accessing Information to Improve Prescribing Decisions – Center for Studying Health System Change Research Brief No 20 – May 2011

Posted on May 6, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Physician Practices, E-Prescribing and Accessing Information to Improve Prescribing Decisions – Center for Studying Health System Change Research Brief No 20 – May 2011

By Joy M. Grossman, Ellyn R. Boukus, Dori A. Cross and Genna R. Cohen

Abstract:
“Hoping to reduce medication errors and contain health care costs, policy makers are promoting electronic prescribing through Medicare and Medicaid financial incentives. Many e-prescribing systems provide electronic access to important information—for example, medications prescribed by physicians in other practices, patient formularies and generic alternatives—when physicians are deciding what medications to prescribe. However, physician practices with e-prescribing face challenges using these features effectively, according to a new qualitative study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

While most of the 24 practices studied reported that physicians had access to patient formulary information, only slightly more than half reported physician access to patient medication histories, and many physicians did not routinely review these sources of information when making prescribing decisions. Study respondents highlighted two barriers to use: 1) tools to view and import the data into patient records were  cumbersome to use in some systems; and 2) the data were not always perceived as useful enough to warrant the additional time to access and review them, particularly during time-pressed patient visits. To support generic prescribing, practices typically set their system defaults to permit pharmacist substitution of generics; many practices also used other tools to more proactively identify and select generic alternatives at the point of prescribing. Overall, physicians who more strongly perceived the need for third-party data, those in practices with greater access to complete and accurate data, and those with easier-to-use e-prescribing systems were more likely to use these features consistently.”

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Proceed with caution: an economic perspective on the UK’s value based pricing proposals – April 2011

Posted on April 21, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy |

Proceed with caution: an economic perspective on the UK’s value based pricing proposals – April 2011

Simon Dixon, Aki Tsuchiya, John Brazier, Matt Stevenson, Paul Tappenden, Jon Tosh, Praveen Thokala

“Summary

The shift from the Pharmaceutical Pricing Regulation Scheme to Value Based Pricing (VBP) is an important change in the way that medicines will be priced, and consequently, reimbursed in the United Kingdom. Whilst the opportunity to purchase new medicines based on value to society is one that should be welcomed, we should proceed with caution. We highlight ten issues that should be considered relating to innovation, the role and meaning of funding threshold and the adjustments to reflect burden of illness, therapeutic innovation and improvement and wider societal factors.

Most importantly, the assessment of value should continue to be based on the characteristics of the displaced activities (e.g. the health produced). To a large extent, all that is changing under VBP are the characteristics being considered; weighted health rather than unweighted health. In addition, we should not totally abandon a cost-utility framework for appraisal just because its current formulation does not match the wider perspective now desired by government.”

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NHS Information Governance Guidance – Updated January 2011

Posted on January 20, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

NHS Information Governance Guidance – Updated January 2011

“The IG requirements are reviewed and updated annually. There have been a number of changes to the NHS Pharmacy Information Governance Requirements in 2010/11.”

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Drug Information Systems – report from Canada Health Infoway – 6 October 2010

Posted on October 8, 2010. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Drug Information Systems to generate $436 million in benefits in 2010
October 6, 2010 (Toronto, ON)

Drug Information Systems
Canada Health Infoway’s Drug Information Systems (DIS) investment program supports jurisdictional projects that will result in interoperable systems that enable authorized health care providers to access, manage, share and safeguard patients’ medication histories.

For each prescription, a DIS will check for allergy alerts and drug-to-drug interactions against a complete medication profile. These systems will dramatically reduce the number of adverse drug reactions by providing physicians and pharmacists with information to support appropriate and accurate prescribing and dispensing.

Executive summary

Full report

Press release

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Rare Diseases and Orphan Products: Accelerating Research and Development – Institute of Medicine – 4 October 2010

Posted on October 5, 2010. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Pharmacy, Research | Tags: , |

Rare Diseases and Orphan Products: Accelerating Research and Development – Institute of Medicine – 4 October 2010

Type: Consensus Report

full text online

“Rare diseases collectively affect millions of Americans of all ages. They often are serious and life-altering; many are life-threatening or fatal. But because each rare disease affects a relatively small population, it can be challenging to develop drugs and medical devices to prevent, diagnose, and treat these conditions. We still lack even a basic understanding of the cause or underlying molecular mechanisms of many rare diseases. To help in accelerating rare diseases research and product development, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), with support from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), asked the IOM to examine the opportunities for and obstacles in developing drugs and medical devices for treating rare diseases.

To guide policymakers, the IOM sets forth the elements of an integrated national strategy to promote rare diseases research and product development. Among other recommendations, the IOM calls for NIH to work with industry, academia, and voluntary organizations to develop a comprehensive system of shared resources for discovery research on rare diseases and to facilitate communication and cooperation for such research. In addition, the IOM calls for the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services to establish a national task force on accelerating rare diseases research and product development. Overall, the effort and investment needed to move further toward a collaborative, coordinated, open, and sustained approach to rare diseases will be substantial, but not making the investment will also be costly. The potential benefits justify a renewed commitment to accelerating rare diseases research and product development.”

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Extent and causes of international variations in drug usage – UK – 27 July 2010

Posted on August 6, 2010. Filed under: Pharmacy |

Extent and causes of international variations in drug usage: a report for the Secretary of State for Health by Professor Sir Mike Richards CBE

Author: Professor Sir Mike Richards CBE MD FRCP
Published date: 27 July 2010
Pages: 100

“This report explores the extent and causes of international variations in drug usage across 14 countries, including the UK, for a range of disease areas.”

Download Extent and causes of international variations in drug usage (PDF, 1041K)

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Extending the Spectrum of Precompetitive Collaboration in Oncology Research – Institute of Medicine – released 22 July 2010

Posted on July 23, 2010. Filed under: Oncology, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Extending the Spectrum of Precompetitive Collaboration in Oncology Research – Institute of Medicine – released 22 July 2010

Full text online 

Workshop Summary
Activity: National Cancer Policy Forum

Note: Workshop Summaries contain the opinion of the presenters, but do NOT reflect the conclusions of the IOM. Learn more about the differences between Workshop Summaries and Consensus Reports.

“Although the cost of research and development for new drugs has increased 50-fold since 1970, the success rate for developing new drugs has not improved. In fields such as oncology, in which patients’ survival may depend on new treatments, there is an urgent need to find a more productive way to develop drugs through cooperation among industry, academia, government, and philanthropic organizations. One solution may be increased precompetitive collaboration, or the collaboration among competitors to achieve goals with the potential to benefit everyone, in oncology drug development. Such collaboration would allow institutions to pool resources and expertise for the multidisciplinary research necessary for drug development. In addition, groups working toward similar objectives could learn from one another’s successes and failures, furthering progress toward a shared goal.

The IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop February 9-10, 2010, to explore the benefits and challenges of precompetitive collaboration. Speakers offered lessons learned and best practices as well as steps to increase collaboration in oncology drug development. This document summarizes the workshop.:

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IFPMA, EFPIA, JPMA & PhRMA Agree Joint Position on Publication of Clinical Trial Results in Scientific Literature – 10 June 2010

Posted on June 22, 2010. Filed under: Pharmacy, Research |

IFPMA, EFPIA, JPMA & PhRMA Agree Joint Position on Publication of Clinical Trial Results in Scientific Literature – Press release

“Industry Commits to Submit for Scientific Journal Publication the Results of all its Phase III Clinical Trials

Geneva, 10 June 2010 – The International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) today approved a “Joint Industry Position on the Publication of Clinical Trial Results in the Scientific Literature”1, previously approved by the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA), the Japanese Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association (JPMA) and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).:

…continues

Joint Position on the Publication of Clinical Trial Results in the Scientific Literature – Statement

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Generic Drug Pricing and Access in Canada: What are the Implications – Health Council of Canada – June 2010

Posted on June 22, 2010. Filed under: Pharmacy | Tags: |

Generic Drug Pricing and Access in Canada: What are the Implications – Health Council of Canada – June 2010

A commissioned discussion paper by SECOR Consulting.
ISBN 978-1-897463-72-7

By Bell C, Griller D, Lawson J, Lovren D.

“Prescription drugs account for an increasing proportion of Canada’s growing health care system with rising costs that governments in this country are seeking ways to restrain.

The greater use of generic drugs, for which Canadians pay some of the highest prices in the world, accounts for a significant portion of these rising costs.
The Health Council of Canada commissioned this independent discussion paper to provide Canadians with some further insight into the generic drug sector and potential options to reduce generic drug prices.”

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WHO Model Formulary for Children – 18 June 2010

Posted on June 18, 2010. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

WHO Model Formulary for Children – June 2010

New WHO guidance to improve use of medicines for children: Model Formulary for Children provides information on how to use over 240 essential medicines

ISBN 978 92 4 159932 0

“18 JUNE 2010 | GENEVA — The first ever WHO Model Formulary for Children released by the WHO provides information on how to use over 240 essential medicines for treating illness and disease in children from 0 to 12 years of age. This means that for the first time medical practitioners worldwide have access to standardized information on the recommended use, dosage, adverse effects, and contraindications of these medicines for use in children. A number of individual countries have developed their own formularies over the years, but until now there was no single comprehensive guide to using medicines in children for all countries.”

…continues

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Prescription charges review: implementing exemption from prescription charges for people with long term conditions – UK – published 27 May 2010

Posted on June 2, 2010. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Pharmacy |

Prescription charges review: implementing exemption from prescription charges for people with long term conditions – UK – published 27 May 2010

This report is the result of an independent review led by the President of the Royal College of Physicians on how a prescription charge exemption for those with long term conditions should be implemented and phased in. The review takes in the views of patient representative groups, charities and other interested parties.

Department of Health – publications

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Medicare Australia’s Administration of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme – Australian National Audit Office – 24 May 2010

Posted on May 24, 2010. Filed under: Health Economics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Medicare Australia’s Administration of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme – Australian National Audit Office – 24 May 2010

ISBN 0 642 81131 8

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Institute for Safe Medication Practices [US] – Guidelines for Standard Order Sets

Posted on March 16, 2010. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pharmacy | Tags: |

[US] Institute for Safe Medication Practices – Guidelines for Standard Order Sets

“The ISMP Guidelines for Standard Order Sets has been developed to help organizations ensure that the elements of safe order communication have been followed when designing paper-based or electronic order sets. The guidelines focus primarily on medication orders within order sets but also cover general aspects related to the design, approval, and maintenance of all standard order sets. ISMP recommends using this checklist to guide the design and evaluation of standard order sets before granting approval for use.

Well-designed standard order sets—both electronic and paper formats—have the potential to:

  • Integrate and coordinate care by communicating best practices through multiple disciplines, levels of care, and services
  • Modify practice through evidence-based care
  • Reduce variation and unintentional oversight through standardized formatting and clear presentation of orders
  • Enhance workflow with pertinent instructions that are easily understood, intuitively organized, and suitable for direct application to current information-management systems
  • Reduce the potential for medication errors through integrated safety alerts and reminders
  • Reduce unnecessary calls to physicians for clarifications and questions about orders.”
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Interruptions to nurses during medication administration – Policy+ – January 2010

Posted on January 20, 2010. Filed under: Nursing, Pharmacy |

Interruptions to nurses during medication administration

“Medication errors can occur at any stage of the medication process including: prescribing, dispensing, preparation, administration and monitoring (1). Medication administration is acknowledged as a major aspect of patient safety (2) and it has been argued that any distraction or interruption during medication administration can result in errors. In this Policy+, we review the evidence on the contribution to medication administration errors of interruptions to nurses’ work. We also consider how such interruptions might be reduced.”

National Nursing Research Unit [London] – publications

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An in depth investigation into causes of prescribing errors by foundation trainees in relation to their medical education – UK – 2 December 2009

Posted on December 22, 2009. Filed under: Patient Safety, Pharmacy | Tags: , |

FINAL report
An in depth investigation into causes of prescribing errors by foundation trainees in relation to their medical education.
EQUIP study.
Tim Dornan (Principal Investigator), Darren Ashcroft, Heather Heathfield, Penny Lewis, Jon Miles, David Taylor, Mary Tully, Val Wass

“Executive Summary

Aim

This programme of research aimed to explore the causes of prescribing errors made by first year foundation trainee (FY1) doctors, concentrating on the interplay between their educational backgrounds and factors in their practice environments. It aimed also to arrive at evidence-based recommendations to improve patient safety and define a future research agenda.”

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