Pathology

High containment laboratories: recent incidents of biosafety lapses – US Government Accountability Office – 16 July 2014

Posted on July 22, 2014. Filed under: Occupational Hlth Safety, Pathology | Tags: |

High containment laboratories: recent incidents of biosafety lapses – US Government Accountability Office – 16 July 2014

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Challenges and improvements in diagnostic services across seven days – NHS Improving Quality – 7 March 2014

Posted on March 13, 2014. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Pathology | Tags: |

Challenges and improvements in diagnostic services across seven days – NHS Improving Quality – 7 March 2014

“Across the country, hospitals and primary and community care organisations are working together to look at ways of delivering safe and effective care over seven days a week. This helps address the link between poorer outcomes for patients and the reduced levels of service provision at the weekend.

Diagnostic and scientific services underpin all models of care irrespective of settings and most clinical pathways. Nationally, the seven day service forum, led by Sir Bruce Keogh, Medical Director for NHS England, has set out a plan to drive seven day services across England in the next three years1, as part of a transformational improvement programme. For this plan to be successful diagnostic and scientific services must be at the centre of service transformation. There are therefore huge opportunities for these services to contribute to delivery of this plan and to improve patient experience and outcomes.”

… continues on the site

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Digital First: Clinical Transformation through Pathology Innovation – NHS England National Pathology Programme – 14 February 2014

Posted on February 18, 2014. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pathology |

Digital First: Clinical Transformation through Pathology Innovation – NHS England National Pathology Programme – 14 February 2014

“The Digital First report highlights innovation in the use of digital systems and processes used in pathology across the country. Systems and processes which have an impact on the quality of care the NHS provides to patients; such as early diagnosis to prevent premature mortality; the care and management of long term conditions and making results visible and easy to interpret for patients.

Pathology services and commissioners are encouraged to download the report to see some of the innovation highlighted in this document.

The National Pathology Programme is developing a common language for pathology information. The National Pathology Programme works with the Health & Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) to produce a National Laboratory Medicine Catalogue (NLMC) which will deliver robust, comprehensive, nationally consistent and comparable information on pathology services.”

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The delivery of 21st century services – The implications for the evolution of the healthcare science workforce – NHS Health Education England – 7 February 2014

Posted on February 11, 2014. Filed under: Pathology, Workforce |

The delivery of 21st century services – The implications for the evolution of the healthcare science workforce – NHS Health Education England – 7 February 2014

“The way services are delivered is changing driven by new technology, the drive to relocate service into primary care and the community and broader range of providers. This will all have major implications for how the healthcare science workforce evolves over the next 20 years and how it will look by 2030. Scientists need to be proactive in driving change and the changes described in this report will bring exciting opportunities to enrich their careers and working lives.

The need to constantly improve the quality of patient care within the context of a challenging economic environment is the central theme of this report. It explores the implications for the scientific workforce from the perspective of a patient centred workforce.”

 

 

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Independent review proposes an upgrade of pathology safety checks to improve patient outcomes [NHS England] – 28 January 2014

Posted on January 30, 2014. Filed under: Pathology, Patient Safety |

Independent review proposes an upgrade of pathology safety checks to improve patient outcomes [NHS England] – 28 January 2014

Independent review site

“A need for transparency, better safety checks on testing, consistency and standardisation of processes and procedures are some of the recommendations made to NHS England in a review into pathology services.

Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, Medical Director of NHS England commissioned Dr Ian Barnes, chair of NHS England’s Pathology Quality Assurance Review Board, to strengthen and refine the quality assurance process for pathology services in England and to make the process more transparent. His request for a detailed and thorough review was prompted by reports of inadequate assurance processes at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, which subsequently resulted in inappropriate care for a number of women with breast cancer.

NHS Pathology services respond to roughly 200 million requests a year, representing involvement in around 80% of patient interactions with the NHS. Testing is at the heart of patient pathways and fundamentally informs diagnosis and treatment, with the potential to contribute significantly to better patient outcomes. The demand for tests is rising as the NHS continues to understand the contribution that pathology can make to better patient outcomes and longer lives.”

… continues on the site

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National Biomarker Development Alliance (NBDA) – Launch – 13 January 2014

Posted on January 16, 2014. Filed under: Pathology |

National Biomarker Development Alliance (NBDA) – Launch – 13 January 2014

“Launch of the National Biomarker Development Alliance (nbda)
The first non-profit, trans-sector, network-based organization dedicated to creating an evidence-based end-to-end biomarker development process”

National Biomarker Development Alliance (NBDA)

More about this

Group Aims for Biomarker Standards – The Scientist – 14 January 2014

“A new alliance between industry, academia, and the government wants to boost the “dismal” success rate of biomarker development.

A new organization called the National Biomarker Development Alliance (NBDA) seeks to get more biomarkers on the market—an ambition that has typically met with failure. According to a press release from NBDA, 150,000 papers have documented protein biomarker “discoveries,” but only 100 biomarkers are in clinical use these days.”

… continues on the site

Launch of a Transformative Health Care Initiative: The National Biomarker Development Alliance (NBDA) – 13 January 2014

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Friends of Science in Medicine (FSM) recommendations for pathology tests in Australia – October 2013

Posted on October 28, 2013. Filed under: Pathology |

Friends of Science in Medicine (FSM) recommendations for pathology tests in Australia – October 2013

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New Guide Details Steps from A-to-Z for Preserving Biological Evidence – National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) – 30 April 2013

Posted on May 1, 2013. Filed under: Pathology | Tags: , , |

New Guide Details Steps from A-to-Z for Preserving Biological Evidence – National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) – 30 April 2013

“A new handbook by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Department of Justice’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) provides forensic laboratories, law enforcement agencies and the judicial system with state-of-the-art guidelines and recommended best practices for preserving biological evidence so that it is available at any time to solve “cold cases,” confirm the guilt of criminals or exonerate the innocent.

Biological evidence refers to two types of evidence commonly recovered from crime scenes or collected during criminal investigations: samples of biological material—blood, semen and other bodily fluids; hair; tissue; bones and teeth—or items containing biological material such as a bloody T-shirt. The Biological Evidence Preservation Handbook: Best Practices for Evidence Handlers (NIST Interagency/Internal Report 7928) is designed to help ensure that this evidence has been properly stored to avoid contamination, premature destruction or degradation, and accurately tracked to prevent loss. It was authored and edited by the Technical Working Group on Biological Evidence Preservation, a group of 20 experts from various forensic, law enforcement and scientific disciplines, as well as legal scholars, medical personnel and representatives of relevant professional organizations.

The handbook is divided into five main sections that explain the issues, offer guidelines and make recommendations related to:

Retention—identifying what biological evidence should be kept and for how long;
Safe handling—including the use of protective equipment, the management of spills or accidents, and methods for properly disposing waste;
Packaging and storing—outlining the conditions for storage and how to properly package biological evidence to maintain its integrity;
Chain of custody and tracking—a review of the different evidence-tracking methods available and procedures for improving all aspects of chain-of-custody recordkeeping; and
Disposition—summarizing the best practices for disposing of biological evidence once retention is no longer required by law.”

… continues on the site

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Modernising healthcare science and quality patient care – making the connection – NHS Employers – 11 April 2013

Posted on April 16, 2013. Filed under: Pathology, Workforce | Tags: , , |

Modernising healthcare science and quality patient care – making the connection – NHS Employers – 11 April 2013

“Modernising healthcare science and quality patient care – making the connection explores the contribution of healthcare science and the opportunities Modernising Scientific Careers (MSC) provides to delivering patient-led services that enhance the quality and outcomes of care.

The Francis report emphasised the need for an NHS culture where the patient is always the priority. Healthcare science can play a major role in improvements in efficiency and effectiveness and delivering high quality services – helping to meet the twin challenge of securing financial savings at the same time as improving quality of care.

Key aims of the briefing

reflect on the progress of MSC to date and how it fits within the new NHS architecture
make the connection between modernising healthcare science and the delivery of quality patient care.
suggest how NHS trust boards might want to engage with healthcare science
demonstrate how in practice healthcare science services are being delivered differently, with positive impacts on patient care and service delivery.”

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Service improvement in blood sciences – NHS Improvement Diagnostics – January 2013

Posted on February 5, 2013. Filed under: Haematology, Pathology | Tags: |

Service improvement in blood sciences – NHS Improvement Diagnostics – January 2013

“How to improve quality, delivery and efficiency for laboratory providers and their customers”

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Workforce planning tools – NHS Employers – 23 November 2012

Posted on November 27, 2012. Filed under: Pathology, Workforce | Tags: |

Workforce planning tools – NHS Employers – 23 November 2012

“Background

NHS Employers is hosting these tools on behalf of the Department of Health to ensure that HR, workforce and healthcare science departments have easy access to them.

What do the tools do?
The tools were developed for three areas of the healthcare science workforce; pathology, physiological sciences and physical science and engineering. They are designed to be used by staff responsible for collecting and analysing healthcare science workforce data to support employers with the healthcare science modernisation agenda.

The tools provide employers with a method for analysing the activity of the current healthcare science workforce and the services provided.

What should I use the tools for?
The tools will enable you to simulate the workforce you require by modelling different scenarios for service delivery. They can help you understand the demand for scientific services and plan your healthcare science workforce accordingly.”

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Healthcare science: Workforce risks and opportunities – education commissioning risks summary from 2012 – Centre for Workforce Intelligence [UK] – November 2012

Posted on November 21, 2012. Filed under: Pathology, Workforce | Tags: , |

Healthcare science: Workforce risks and opportunities – education commissioning risks summary from 2012 – Centre for Workforce Intelligence [UK] – November 2012

“This report describes the key issues facing the healthcare science workforce over the next three years, including:

•considerations for future requirements
•current and forecast supply
•an annex detailing training pathways, recruitment issues and employment data for different healthcare science specialisms.

The aim of this work is to support local decisions on future education and training commissioning, made through consultation between the education and training commissioner and employers.

This is one of 40 reports produced by the CfWI in 2012 detailing the education commissioning risks for 77 professions.”

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Healthcare science: Workforce risks and opportunities – education commissioning risks summary from 2012 – Centre for Workforce Intelligence [UK] – November 2012

Posted on November 9, 2012. Filed under: Pathology, Workforce | Tags: |

Healthcare science: Workforce risks and opportunities – education commissioning risks summary from 2012 – Centre for Workforce Intelligence [UK] – November 2012

“This report describes the key issues facing the healthcare science workforce over the next three years, including:

•considerations for future requirements
•current and forecast supply
•an annex detailing training pathways, recruitment issues and employment data for different healthcare science specialisms.
The aim of this work is to support local decisions on future education and training commissioning, made through consultation between the education and training commissioner and employers.

This is one of 40 reports produced by the CfWI in 2012 detailing the education commissioning risks for 77 professions.”

Media report
 
Other reports

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Modernising Scientific Careers (MSC): updated training pathways – NHS Employers – 24 August 2012

Posted on August 28, 2012. Filed under: Pathology, Workforce | Tags: |

Modernising Scientific Careers (MSC): updated training pathways – NHS Employers – 24 August 2012

“NHS Employers has produced a factsheet that provides information on the updated Modernising Scientific Careers training pathways.”

“This factsheet summarises the training routes available to the healthcare science workforce within the Modernising Scientific Careers (MSC) programme. It highlights the new training pathways currently available, and indicates those still in development. Work is underway to develop an employer focussed framework for employing healthcare scientists to reflect these updated job roles and assist with streamlined workforce planning. This is expected to be completed by spring 2013.”

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Service improvement in microbiology: why, what and how – National Pathology Programme, NHS Improvement Guide – July 2012

Posted on July 18, 2012. Filed under: Pathology | Tags: , |

Service improvement in microbiology: why, what and how – National Pathology Programme, NHS Improvement Guide – July 2012

“In 2006 the Review of Pathology Services in England by Lord Carter, endorsed Lean as the method of choice for improving processes in pathology services.

Working in partnership with the Department of Health (DH) Pathology Programme, NHS Improvement has supported a number of microbiology teams, including the eight acute Trusts in the former East Midlands SHA, to learn how Lean methodology can enable the service to achieve improvements to support the QIPP, (quality, innovation, productivity and prevention) transformation programme.

Multidisciplinary teams worked collaboratively to test and implement changes that deliver improvements for patients, staff and users of the service.”

… continues

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Evolution of Translational Omics: Lessons Learned and the Path Forward – Institute of Medicine – 23 March 2012

Posted on March 26, 2012. Filed under: Genomics, Health Technology Assessment, Pathology | Tags: , , |

Evolution of Translational Omics: Lessons Learned and the Path Forward – Institute of Medicine – 23 March 2012

full text

“Technologies that are collectively called omics have made it feasible to measure an enormous number of molecules within a tissue or cell; for example, genomics investigates thousands of DNA sequences, and proteomics examines large numbers of proteins. Patients look to the scientific community to develop innovative omics-based tests to more reliably detect disease and to predict their likelihood of responding to specific drugs. However, the translation of these new technologies into clinical laboratory tests that can help patients directly has happened more slowly than anticipated.

Following a recent case involving premature use of omics-based tests in cancer clinical trials at Duke University, the National Cancer Institute requested that the IOM establish a committee to recommend ways to strengthen omics-based test development and evaluation. The IOM’s recommendations speak to the many parties responsible for discovery and development of omics-based tests, including investigators, their institutions, sponsors of research, the FDA, and journals. The report identifies best practices to enhance development, evaluation, and translation of omics-based tests while simultaneously reinforcing steps to ensure that these tests are appropriately assessed for scientific validity before they are used to guide patient treatment in clinical trials. The IOM’s recommendations aim to ensure that progress in omics test development is grounded in sound scientific practice and is reproducible, resulting not only in improved health care but also in continued public trust.”

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Revised guidance on Clostridium difficile issued – Department of Health [UK] – 6 March 2012

Posted on March 8, 2012. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Pathology | Tags: |

Revised guidance on Clostridium difficile issued – Department of Health [UK] – 6 March 2012

“The Department today issued revised guidance on how to test, report and manage C. difficile infections.  In particular, the new guidance will help healthcare providers by identifying which two types of tests, which when used in combination, will deliver the most accurate results for C. difficile infection testing.

The guidance includes a testing algorithm that provides a step-by-step means of optimising performance, with the ability to clinically categorise patients with much greater accuracy.

It sets out:”

… continues

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Confused by genetic tests? NIH’s new online tool may help – 29 February 2012

Posted on March 6, 2012. Filed under: Genomics, Pathology |

Confused by genetic tests? NIH’s new online tool may help – 29 February 2012

“An online tool launched today by the National Institutes of Health will make it easier to navigate the rapidly changing landscape of genetic tests. The free resource, called the Genetic Testing Registry (GTR), is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gtr/.

“I’m delighted that NIH has created this powerful, new tool. It is a tremendous resource for all who are struggling to make sense of the complex world of genetic testing,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D., who unveiled GTR at NIH’s observance of international Rare Disease Day. “This registry will help a lot of people — from health care professionals looking for answers to their patients’ diseases to researchers seeking to identify gaps in scientific knowledge.”

Genetic tests currently exist for about 2,500 diseases, and the field continues to grow at an astonishing rate. To keep pace, GTR will be updated frequently, using data voluntarily submitted by genetic test providers. Such information will include the purpose of each genetic test and its limitations; the name and location of the test provider; whether it is a clinical or research test; what methods are used; and what is measured. GTR will contain no confidential information about people who receive genetic tests or individual test results.”

… continues on the site

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Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High Containment Biological Laboratories – National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council – 2011

Posted on December 20, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Pathology | Tags: , |

Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High Containment Biological Laboratories – National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council – 2011

ISBN-10: 0-309-22575-2    ISBN-13: 978-0-309-22575-5

“During July 10-13, 2011, 68 participants from 32 countries gathered in Istanbul, Turkey for a workshop organized by the United States National Research Council on Anticipating Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High-containment Biological Laboratories. The United States Department of State’s Biosecurity Engagement Program sponsored the workshop, which was held in partnership with the Turkish Academy of Sciences. The international workshop examined biosafety and biosecurity issues related to the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of high-containment biological laboratories- equivalent to United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention biological safety level 3 or 4 labs. Although these laboratories are needed to characterize highly dangerous human and animal pathogens, assist in disease surveillance, and produce vaccines, they are complex systems with inherent risks.

Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High-Containment Biological Laboratories summarizes the workshop discussion, which included the following topics:

Technological options to meet diagnostic, research, and other goals;
Laboratory construction and commissioning;
Operational maintenance to provide sustainable capabilities, safety, and security; and
Measures for encouraging a culture of responsible conduct.
 
Workshop attendees described the history and current challenges they face in their individual laboratories. Speakers recounted steps they were taking to improve safety and security, from running training programs to implementing a variety of personnel reliability measures. Many also spoke about physical security, access controls, and monitoring pathogen inventories. Workshop participants also identified tensions in the field and suggested possible areas for action.”

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Animal Models for Assessing Countermeasures to Bioterrorism Agents – National Research Council [US] – 2011

Posted on December 7, 2011. Filed under: Disaster Management, Pathology | Tags: , |

Animal Models for Assessing Countermeasures to Bioterrorism Agents – National Research Council [US] – 2011
ISBN-10: 0-309-21909-4
ISBN-13: 978-0-309-21909-9

“The Transformational Medical Technologies (TMT) has been a unique component of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) medical biodefense efforts since 2006. Its mission is to advance countermeasure research and development in support of the broader goal of the DoD to protect warfighters from emerging infectious diseases and future genetically engineered biological weapons. The TMT, using advanced science and technology approaches, focused on the development of roadspectrum countermeasures that target common host and pathogen pathways or enhance the host’s immune response. Many of these pathogens are lethal or cause such debilitating diseases in humans that it is ethically inappropriate to test the efficacy of these countermeasures in human volunteers. In lieu of human participants, these products may be tested in animals and approved for human use under the provisions of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s 2002 Animal Rule. The reliance on animal models for the development and licensure of medical countermeasures against biothreats is challenging for a number of reasons.

The ad hoc Committee on Animal Models for Assessing Countermeasures to Bioterrorism Agents prepared a consensus report that would address the challenges stemming from developing and testing medical countermeasures against biothreat agents in animal models. Animal Models for Assessing Countermeasures to Bioterrorism Agents evaluates how well the existing TMT-employed or candidate animal models reflect the pathophysiology, clinical picture, and treatment of human disease as related to the agents of interest. The report addresses the process and/or feasibility of developing new animal models for critical biodefense research, placing emphasis on the need for a robust and expeditious validation process in terms of the FDA’s Animal Rule. The report also evaluates alternatives to the use of animal models based on the premise of the Three Rs.”

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Prudent Practices in the Laboratory: Handling and Management of Chemical Hazards, Revised Edition – National Academies Press – 2011

Posted on March 28, 2011. Filed under: Occupational Hlth Safety, Pathology |

Prudent Practices in the Laboratory: Handling and Management of Chemical Hazards, Revised Edition – National Academies Press – 2011
The Committee on Prudent Practices in the Laboratory: An Update; National Research Council

ISBN-10: 0-309-13864-7
ISBN-13: 978-0-309-13864-2

“Prudent Practices in the Laboratory–the book that has served for decades as the standard for chemical laboratory safety practice–now features updates and new topics. This revised edition has an expanded chapter on chemical management and delves into new areas, such as nanotechnology, laboratory security, and emergency planning.

Developed by experts from academia and industry, with specialties in such areas as chemical sciences, pollution prevention, and laboratory safety, Prudent Practices in the Laboratory provides guidance on planning procedures for the handling, storage, and disposal of chemicals. The book offers prudent practices designed to promote safety and includes practical information on assessing hazards, managing chemicals, disposing of wastes, and more.

Prudent Practices in the Laboratory will continue to serve as the leading source of chemical safety guidelines for people working with laboratory chemicals: research chemists, technicians, safety officers, educators, and students.”

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CDC award boosts hospital labs’ ability to report results

Posted on February 22, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Pathology, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

CDC award boosts hospital labs’ ability to report results
By Mary Mosquera
Monday, February 21, 2011

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded a grant to three organizations to help connect hospital laboratories with public health agencies so they can electronically transmit data on reportable laboratory results.

The three organizations — e-prescribing network Surescripts, the American Hospital Association (AHA) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) — will provide the necessary technical assistance to enable hospital labs to begin transmitting results within six months, according to an announcement by Surescripts.

They will work together in what the CDC calls a “lab interoperability cooperative” to promote the exchange of test results and patient information to support meaningful use. 

During the two year grant period, AHA, Surescripts and CAP, which is the medical society for physicians and the laboratory community, will recruit, educate and connect a minimum of 500 hospital labs to the appropriate public health agencies.

At least 100 of the hospital labs will be critical access or rural hospitals, the groups involved said.

The CDC grant will help hospital laboratories meet criteria established by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT for meaningful use of EHRs, including submission of electronic data on reportable laboratory results to public health agencies.

While technical standards exist to enable the secure electronic exchange of lab results, few commercial labs, hospitals and providers use them. The lab cooperative will engage with hospital labs, which handle the majority of lab tests, to advance lab interoperability with public health agencies.

“As a result of this effort, hundreds of hospitals will engage in electronic reporting that helps public health act more rapidly and efficiently to control disease,” said Seth Foldy, director of CDC’s Public Health Informatics and Technology Program Office.”

…continues on the site

also reported here:

Project to assist hospital labs in submitting electronic data
February 21, 2011 | Molly Merrill, Associate Editor

“Surescripts, the American Hospital Association and the College of American Pathologists have been awarded a $4.9 million grant to launch a program to prepare hospitals to submit electronic data on reportable lab results to public health agencies – a Stage 1 requirement for meeting meaningful use incentives.

The grant from the the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which was announced Monday, will allow the three organizations to work together in what the CDC calls a “Lab Interoperability Cooperative.”

During the two-year grant period, the AHA, CAP and Surescripts will recruit, educate and connect a minimum of 500 hospital labs – of which 100 are critical access or rural hospitals – to the appropriate public health agencies.

The network will support all federal and state policies and standards for health information exchange, including privacy and security standards (such as HIPAA and state law), technology interoperability standards (such as NHIN Direct and NHIN Exchange) and message types such as HL7.

The cooperative will provide technical assistance to enable hospital labs to begin transmitting lab results electronically within six months, but officials said that assistance has not yet been defined.

The AHA will take the lead on educating and reaching out to hospitals about the project.

The CAP will “actively leverage our relationships with its 17,000 pathologists,” said Debra J. Konicek, MSN, RN, BC, the college’s director of clinical consulting and mapping.

The goal of the project is to assist hospitals to electronically report a core set of 75-100 lab reports to public health agencies, said Konicek. Hospitals are already required to report this, but the network will prepare them to do it in real time, she said.”

…continues on the site

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Perspectives on Biomarker and Surrogate Endpoint Evaluation – Workshop Summary from the Institute of Medicine

Posted on January 19, 2011. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Pathology | Tags: , , |

Perspectives on Biomarker and Surrogate Endpoint Evaluation – Workshop Summary from the Institute of Medicine
18 January 2011

“Doctors, scientists, and other health professionals use biomarkers as tools to obtain information about a person’s health status or response to interventions. Defined as characteristics that indicate biological processes, biomarkers are essential for monitoring the health of both individuals and communities. In 2008, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) asked the IOM to conduct a study on the evaluation process for biomark¬ers, focusing on biomarkers and surrogate endpoints in chronic disease. In its report Evaluation of Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints in Chronic Disease, the IOM recommends that the FDA adopt a consistent scientific framework to evaluate biomarkers, consisting of three steps: analytical validation, evidentiary qualification, and utilization analysis.

The IOM held a workshop June 21-22, 2010, to provide stakeholders with an opportunity to learn about, react to, and discuss the report. Presenters provided perspectives on the report from the point of view of participants from the FDA, the National Institutes of Health, and from a diverse group of industry stakeholders. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Report of the Investigators of Surgical and Pathology Issues at Three Essex County Hospitals – Canada

Posted on August 6, 2010. Filed under: Pathology |

Report of the Investigators of Surgical and Pathology Issues at Three Essex County Hospitals: Hôtel-Dieu Grace Hospital, Leamington District Memorial Hospital and Windsor Regional Hospital

July 2010

“Ontario’s Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, Deb Matthews, appointed an Investigation Team to review and report on issues related to the quality of care and treatment of patients at three Essex County Hospitals: Hôtel-Dieu Grace Hospital, Windsor Regional Hospital and Leamington District Memorial Hospital. The Investigators have submitted their final report to the ministry.”

The full report may be downloaded from the link below.

Document Download
Report of the Investigators of Surgical and Pathology Issues at Three Essex County Hospitals: Hôtel-Dieu Grace Hospital, Leamington District Memorial Hospital and Windsor Regional Hospital

74 pages | 469 kb | PDF format

Canadian Association of Pathologists News on this issue

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Review of Laboratories of Eastern Health – Consultation Report July 29 2010 [Canada]

Posted on August 6, 2010. Filed under: Pathology |

Review of Laboratories of Eastern Health Consultation Report July 29 2010 [Canada]

News Release_Eastern Health Releases Review of Laboratories  July29 2010

“July 29, 2010: St. John’s, NL – Eastern Health today released the Review of Laboratories of Eastern Health by University Health Network (UHN) Laboratory Medicine Program.

Eastern Health undertook the review following the discovery in February of testing errors related to cyclosporine within the biochemistry laboratory. As part of this review, UHN reviewed the laboratories within the Health Sciences Centre and St. Clare’s Mercy Hospital. This included on-site visits to each of the laboratories; a review of global operations, safety, Quality System development and Laboratory Information Systems at both facilities; review of documentation including policies, processes, procedures, and records; and, interviews with laboratory medical and scientific leadership and staff.

Further, UHN conducted a detailed review of the cyclosporine testing error and responded to the questions that were raised in the internal review of the incident that had been carried out by Eastern Health.”

…continues

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Extraordinary you – [UK] science in healthcare celebrates the careers of healthcare scientists – 18 July 2010

Posted on July 21, 2010. Filed under: Health Professions, Pathology | Tags: |

Extraordinary you – [UK] science in healthcare celebrates the careers of healthcare scientists – 18 July 2010

 Author: Department of Health
 Pages: 61

“Extraordinary you: science in healthcare celebrates the careers of healthcare scientists working across the NHS. The book profiles the wide range of pioneering work of nearly 100 individual healthcare scientists working across the specialisms, to inspire people about the role of healthcare science and to encourage others to join the profession.”

Download Extraordinary you (PDF, 8151K)

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Medical Laboratory Technologists and Their Work Environment – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 3 June 2010

Posted on June 11, 2010. Filed under: Pathology | Tags: |

Medical Laboratory Technologists and Their Work Environment – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 3 June 2010
Pages: 106
ISBN 978-1-55465-747-6 (PDF)

This report is based on data collected in two of CIHI’s databases, the Medical Laboratory Technologist Database (MLTDB) and the Canadian MIS Database (CMDB). Specifically, this report provides information on medical laboratory technologists as a distinct healthcare provider group and their work environment in public-sector hospital clinical laboratory services.

Full Report
Download Medical Laboratory Technologists and Their Work Environment (PDF) 1663 KB

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CDC to Monitor Reactions and Errors Associated with Blood Transfusions – 18 February 2010

Posted on February 22, 2010. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Haematology, Pathology, Patient Safety | Tags: , , |

CDC to Monitor Reactions and Errors Associated with Blood Transfusions – 18 February 2010

Extracts from the CDC press release:

“The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has launched the first national surveillance system to monitor adverse events in patients who receive blood transfusions. CDC is encouraging healthcare facilities across the country to enroll in this new surveillance system, which was designed to improve patient safety.

By having a coordinated national network, CDC can summarize national data to understand better how to prevent adverse transfusion events such as reactions to blood products, medical errors, and process problems. The system, called the Hemovigilance Module, is part of CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). NHSN is an Internet-based surveillance system that allows healthcare-associated infection data to be tracked and analyzed to allow CDC and healthcare facilities to maximize prevention efforts. The Hemovigilance Module was developed by CDC in collaboration with AABB, an international association representing organizations involved in transfusion and cellular therapies.”  …..

“Hospitals will submit data confidentially to CDC through the Hemovigilance Module. CDC will review the national data in collaboration with AABB and other partners to help identify ways to improve the safety of blood transfusion. Previously, transfusion-related events were monitored by facilities on their own. Now, hospitals that join the Hemovigilance Module will have access to standardized data analysis tools, as well as an opportunity to see how their data compare to other hospitals throughout the United States.”  …

“CDC provides the module at no cost to hospitals and healthcare facilities. The agency also provides participating facilities with training and ongoing user support at no cost to the facilities.”

For more information, please visit the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) .

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Pathology Programme Update 2009 – UK – 26 January 2010

Posted on January 28, 2010. Filed under: Pathology |

Pathology Programme Update 2009 – UK – 26 January 2010
Document type: Guidance
Author: [UK]  Department of Health
Published date: 26 January 2010

“The Department of Health’s Response to the report of the Independent Review of NHS Pathology Services (the Carter Review) set out the work programme for 2009. The response included specific detail on how DH intended to respond to the 20 recommendations made by Lord Carter of Coles and his team; and also undertook to report on progress at the end of 2009. This report provides an update on progress in key workstreams and developments over the past year in the DH Pathology Programme.”

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Pathology Workforce Survey – 2007 – Australian – published September 2009

Posted on September 25, 2009. Filed under: Pathology, Workforce | Tags: |

Pathology Workforce Survey – 2007 – NPAAC Pathology Workforce Survey undertaken in 2007

“One of the core functions of the National Pathology Accreditation Advisory Council (NPAAC) is to develop and maintain the standards used for the Australian pathology accreditation framework. A key standard within the NPAAC suite of documents is one that relates to the day-to-day supervisory provisions within pathology laboratories. For NPAAC to consider appropriate models of supervision, a profile of projected workforce numbers was essential.

In late 2007, NPAAC undertook a workforce census of Pathologists and Senior Scientists working in Accredited Pathology Laboratories (APLs) in Australia. Of the 514 APLs and peak professional bodies that were consulted, a response rate of 58.95% was achieved.

The following document contains the collected survey data as well as a time series model that predicts the workforce under different conditions over the next 25 years.”

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General practice in Australia, health priorities and policies 1998 to 2008 – AIHW Report – 8 July 2009

Posted on July 8, 2009. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Chronic Disease Mgmt, General Practice, Pathology, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion, Workforce | Tags: , |

General practice in Australia, health priorities and policies 1998 to 2008
Authored by Britt H & Miller GC.  Published by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 8 July 2009; ISSN 1442-3022; ISBN-13 978 1 74024 934 8; AIHW cat. no. GEP 24; 308pp.   General practice series no. 24

“This report looks extensively at changes in the activities of GPs from 1998 to 2008 in the light of numerous government initiatives and changes in the GP workforce and in the population. It shows that GP activity generally correlates well with health policy initiatives and clinical guidelines, notably with Type 2 diabetes and the control of asthma and high blood cholesterol levels. In some areas, however, there is less evidence of an effect so far. The report also raises some potential concerns about the costs from the continued rapid growth in orders for pathology testing and the overall challenge for the GP workforce in dealing with an ageing population with complex needs.”

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Updated antiviral guidelines and rapid tests for diagnosing influenza – Australian National Prescribing Service June 2009

Posted on June 10, 2009. Filed under: Diagnostics, Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu, Pathology, Pharmacy |

Updated antiviral guidelines and rapid tests for diagnosing influenza

“Guidelines for prescribing antivirals for people who have been in contact with suspected or confirmed cases of swine influenza (H1N1) have been updated by the Department of Health and Ageing following more confirmed cases in Australia. The Department now recommends the following.

Antiviral medication may be prescribed to close contacts of confirmed or influenza A positive suspected cases provided it is commenced within 7 days of last contact with the patient while the patient was still infectious.

Any prescription of antiviral medication should be on the recommendation of the local public health unit.” …continues on the website

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Fighting MRSA and C.difficile – development underway for a hand-held detection system – 18 May 2009

Posted on May 19, 2009. Filed under: Health Technology Assessment, Infection Control, Pathology |

Fighting MRSA and C.difficile

info copied from Response Source

* Submitted by: Cambridge Design Partnership
* Monday, 18 May 2009

“Universal Sensors, Nottingham Trent University and Cambridge Design Partnership to help in the fight against the hospital superbugs, C.difficile and MRSA.

Universal Sensors Ltd (Cambridge, UK), Nottingham Trent University (Nottingham, UK) and Cambridge Design Partnership (Cambridge, UK) have entered into a strategic alliance to develop a hand-held system to detect the hospital superbugs, C.difficile and MRSA. The collaboration is funded through the new Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI), in contracts that were awarded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Invention for Innovation (i4i) Programme, the results of which were announced on 15th May 2009.

The control of Health Care Associated Infections (HAIs) and improving the cleanliness of hospitals are primary objectives for the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), but reducing the incidence of HAIs from our hospitals has been a challenge. In 2008, the NHS spent £53 million undertaking a comprehensive “deep clean” of every hospital in the UK and many NHS Trusts are now reporting a decrease in the incidence of both C.difficile and MRSA as a result of this and other initiatives implemented by dedicated Infection Control teams.” … continues on the website

Universal Sensors Ltd

Nottingham Trent University

Cambridge Design Partnership

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Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward – National Academies Press – February 2009

Posted on April 9, 2009. Filed under: Diagnostics, Pathology | Tags: |

Scores of talented and dedicated people serve the forensic science community, performing vitally important work. However, they are often constrained by lack of adequate resources, sound policies, and national support. It is clear that change and advancements, both systematic and scientific, are needed in a number of forensic science disciplines to ensure the reliability of work, establish enforceable standards, and promote best practices with consistent application. Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward provides a detailed plan for addressing these needs and suggests the creation of a new government entity, the National Institute of Forensic Science, to establish and enforce standards within the forensic science community.

The benefits of improving and regulating the forensic science disciplines are clear: assisting law enforcement officials, enhancing homeland security, and reducing the risk of wrongful conviction and exoneration. Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States gives a full account of what is needed to advance the forensic science disciplines, including upgrading of systems and organizational structures, better training, widespread adoption of uniform and enforceable best practices, and mandatory certification and accreditation programs.

While this book provides an essential call-to-action for congress and policy makers, it also serves as a vital tool for law enforcement agencies, criminal prosecutors and attorneys, and forensic science educators.

HARDBACK
ISBN-10: 0-309-13135-9
ISBN-13: 978-0-309-13135-3

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Ontario Wait Times [for Emergency Room and for Surgery & Diagnostic Imaging]

Posted on April 9, 2009. Filed under: Diagnostics, Emergency Medicine, Pathology, Radiology, Surgery | Tags: , |

A wait times website from the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

From Canada’s Health Newsweekly – Health Edition Online

Ontario sets ER wait-time targets
February 20, 2009
Ontario is setting firm targets for ER wait times.

The clock starts ticking when a patient registers at the ER and stops when the patient is discharged home or admitted to a hospital bed.

….continues on the Health Edition website

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The report of the second phase of the review of NHS pathology services in England

Posted on April 7, 2009. Filed under: Pathology |

This report focuses on three main themes: improving quality and patient safety, improving efficiency and identifying the mechanisms for delivering change. The review estimated that significant savings could be realised by the NHS through consolidating pathology services, and made specific recommendations for change. The Department of Health have also published their response to the report. (Department for Health – publications)   18 Dec 2008  52 p.

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