Oncology

Contemporary Issues for Protecting Patients in Cancer Research: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2014

Posted on July 8, 2014. Filed under: Oncology, Research | Tags: , |

Contemporary Issues for Protecting Patients in Cancer Research: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 2014

Institute of Medicine. Contemporary Issues for Protecting Patients in Cancer Research: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2014.

“Description

In the nearly 40 years since implementation of federal regulations governing the protection of human participants in research, the number of clinical studies has grown exponentially. These studies have become more complex, with multisite trials now common, and there is increasing use of archived biospecimens and related data, including genomics data. In addition, growing emphasis on targeted cancer therapies requires greater collaboration and sharing of research data to ensure that rare patient subsets are adequately represented. Electronic records enable more extensive data collection and mining, but also raise concerns about the potential for inappropriate or unauthorized use of data, bringing patient protections into a new landscape. There are also long-standing concerns about the processes and forms used to obtain informed consent from patients participating in clinical studies. These changes and challenges raise new ethical and practical questions for the oversight of clinical studies, and for protecting patients and their health information in an efficient manner that does not compromise the progress of biomedical research.

Contemporary Issues for Protecting Patients in Cancer Research is the summary of a workshop convened by the National Cancer Policy Forum of the Institute of Medicine in February 2014 to explore contemporary issues in human subjects protections as they pertain to cancer research, with the goal of identifying potential relevant policy actions. Clinical researchers, government officials, members of Institutional Review Boards, and patient advocates met to discuss clinical cancer research and oversight. This report examines current regulatory provisions that may not adequately protect patients or may be hindering research, and discusses potential strategies and actions to address those challenges.”

 

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Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014-2024 – AIHW – 1 July 2014

Posted on July 1, 2014. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology | Tags: |

Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014-2024 – AIHW – 1 July 2014

“Radiation oncology areas of need: cancer incidence projections 2014–2024 presents cancer incidence projections at the jurisdictional health planning region level for 2014 to 2024. These projections were developed specifically for Australian Government Department of Health planning purposes.”

ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-588-0; Cat. no. CAN 82; 42pp

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Radiation Oncology National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Plan – NZ Ministry of Health – 20 June 2014

Posted on June 25, 2014. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology, Workforce |

Radiation Oncology National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Plan – NZ Ministry of Health – 20 June 2014

“This Radiation Oncology National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Plan (‘the Plan’) is intended to inform a nationally coordinated approach to radiation oncology service and capacity development, within the context of the National Cancer Programme.

The Plan focuses in particular on projected demand growth for radiation therapy, its implications for linear accelerator (‘linac’) and workforce capacity, and associated cost impacts. It also considers issues arising from this capacity modelling, including:

variation in access to radiation therapy
radiation therapy intervention rates
development of national benchmarking and standards to support performance and quality improvement
evaluation and uptake of new techniques and models of care
fostering national collaboration.

It builds on initial capacity planning of radiation therapy services published in 2012 by the regional cancer networks, and provides national guidance and a tool (the ‘National Linear Accelerator and Workforce Capacity Model’) to support further development of local and regional service and capacity planning by DHBs. In addition, the Plan will inform national decision-making by the Ministry and other central agencies on radiation oncology services over the next 5–10 years.

The aims of national planning for radiation oncology services are to support:”

… continues on the site

 

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Estimating the Economic Returns on Cancer Research in the UK – RAND – 2014

Posted on June 19, 2014. Filed under: Health Economics, Oncology, Research | Tags: |

Estimating the Economic Returns on Cancer Research in the UK – RAND – 2014

“In recent years, researchers and funders have aimed to better understand the range of impacts arising from public and charitable funding for medical research — including the resulting economic benefits. Such information provides accountability to taxpayers and charity donors, and increases our understanding of how research effectively translates to health gains. Financial returns may not be a key driver in research decisions, but the demands on public funding are substantial and it is therefore important to evaluate investment in research.

While it is easy to cite examples of breakthroughs that have led to substantial patient benefits or improvements in quality of life, it is more difficult to assess the nature and extent of the economic returns arising from investment in a whole body of medical research, some of which may inevitably be less fruitful.
Goals

This study, led by RAND Europe, the Health Economics Research Group (HERG) at Brunel University and King’s College London, aimed to estimate the returns generated by public and charitable investment in UK research. The work focuses on cancer and followed a ground-breaking study published in 2008, which yielded the first quantitative assessment of the economic benefit of biomedical and health science in the UK. The original report focused on the returns generated from investment in cardiovascular disease research, also testing the methodology to a more limited extent on mental health research.”

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Use of health and social care by people with cancer – Nuffield Trust – 2 June 2014

Posted on June 3, 2014. Filed under: Oncology, Social Work | Tags: |

Use of health and social care by people with cancer – Nuffield Trust – 2 June 2014

“This report presents the results of our study into the primary, secondary and social care use of people diagnosed with cancer.

Summary

There are estimated to be around two million people living with cancer in the UK. Improved survival rates, earlier detection and an ageing population have led to cancer incidence increasing, but it is now seen as a chronic condition rather than necessarily a fatal illness. This shift has led to a growing focus on survivorship, and on the long-term needs of those living with and after cancer.

To find out how this impacts on the use of health and social care services, we used data linkage methods to track the patterns of service use across health and social care in the year after people were diagnosed with cancer.”

… continues on the site

 

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Cancer in the UK 2014: state of the nation report – Macmillan – 2 May 2014

Posted on May 5, 2014. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer in the UK 2014: state of the nation report – Macmillan – 2 May 2014

News release: UK cancer care crisis looming, warns new report – Macmillan – 2 May 2014

” Macmillan Cancer Support’s first ever state-of-the-nation report on the issues that matter most to cancer patients reveals that tens of thousands of UK cancer patients are diagnosed too late, shown a lack of compassion, or denied a ‘good’ death.

Cancer in the UK 2014 shows that one in three (32%) people with cancer die within a year of diagnosis[i], suggesting for many their cancer is diagnosed too late. One in four people with cancer are diagnosed via an emergency admission, and those diagnosed this way are on average twice as likely to die within a year than those diagnosed via an urgent GP referral[ii].

The UK also has the lowest one-year survival rates for four cancer types (colorectal, lung, breast and ovarian) compared with five countries that all have similar health systems and levels of wealth (Australia, Canada, Sweden, Denmark and Norway)[iii].

As well as being diagnosed too late, too many people with cancer are being shown a lack of compassion. While NHS staff deliver exceptional care daily, almost a fifth (19%) of cancer patients felt treated as a ‘set of symptoms’ rather than a person, while one in six (17%) said doctors spoke to them as if they weren’t there[iv]. A major factor for this is unhappy staff. In hospitals where staff experience discrimination and are not valued, cancer patients are 18 times more likely to receive poor care.

Furthermore many people with cancer are also being denied a ‘good’ death. While 73%[v] want to die at home, fewer than a third (30%) are able to do so[vi] and more than half (57%) did not have complete pain relief in the last three months of their lives[vii].

But by 2020 almost half of the population will have a cancer diagnosis in their lifetimes[viii] but our health and social care systems are being too slow to react to the growing number of people getting and surviving cancer.”

… continues on the site

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Cancer’s unequal burden: The reality behind improving cancer survival rates – Macmillan Cancer Support – 4 April 2014

Posted on April 8, 2014. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer’s unequal burden: The reality behind improving cancer survival rates – Macmillan Cancer Support – 4 April 2014

News release: Long-term lung cancer survivors ten times more likely to get new cancer than breast or prostate survivors

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Burden of disease from Household Air Pollution for 2012 – WHO – 25 March 2014

Posted on March 26, 2014. Filed under: Cardiol / Cardiothor Surg, Oncology, Respiratory Medicine | Tags: , |

Burden of disease from Household Air Pollution for 2012 – WHO – 25 March 2014

“In new estimates released today, WHO reports that in 2012 around 7 million people died – one in eight of total global deaths – as a result of air pollution exposure. This finding more than doubles previous estimates and confirms that air pollution is now the world’s largest single environmental health risk. Reducing air pollution could save millions of lives.”

… continues on the site

Report

 

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Just a little more time: rare cancers baseline report – Rare Cancers Australia – 17 March 2014

Posted on March 19, 2014. Filed under: Oncology |

Just a little more time: rare cancers baseline report – Rare Cancers Australia – 17 March 2014

Extract from the executive summary:

“For those Australians with rare or less common cancers we have, for the most part, failed dismally. While it is true that we have made some excellent progress in common cancers over the last 20 years, survival rates in many rare cancers have only improved marginally if at all, our research funding into rare cancers remains disappointingly and disproportionately low, as does the money we spend on government funded treatments for these patients. It is hard to believe that in the 20 years from 1990 to 2009 with all the advances in medical science and technology, that we have achieved so little for this group of patients and their families.

This report calls on the Australian Government to take action for improving outcomes for rare and less common cancer patients, to review existing mechanisms and improve research, diagnostics and access to medicines for rare and less common cancers. Without targeted mechanisms specifically designed to address the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of RLC cancers we cannot hope to have an impact on mortality or improve patient outcomes in the coming years.”

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Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence – analysing the importance of the National Lung Cancer Audit – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

Posted on February 4, 2014. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Oncology |

Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence – analysing the importance of the National Lung Cancer Audit – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

“A unique 20 year project to tackle the UK’s biggest cancer killer has become a “world leader in cancer intelligence”, according to a new report.

The National Lung Cancer Audit was launched in 1994 and captures up to date information on almost every lung cancer case in the UK.

It compares clinical practice at hospitals across the country, helping to identify problem areas and drive up standards of care for the disease, which kills 35,000 people every year.

The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation has produced a report – Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence – analysing the importance of the National Lung Cancer Audit

Authors of the audit have credited it with:

increasing the number of patients who receive radiotherapy from 25% in 2008 to 30% in 2012

increasing the number of patients who have surgery from 10% in 2008 to 15% in 2012

increasing the number of patients who have chemotherapy from 27% in 2008 to 32% in 2012

increasing the number of patients who see a nurse specialist from 50% in 2008 to 80% in 2012”

… continues on the site

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World Cancer Report 2014 – International Agency for Research on Cancer – February 2014

Posted on February 4, 2014. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

World Cancer Report 2014 – International Agency for Research on Cancer – February 2014

ISBN 978-92-832-0429-9
Edited by Bernard W. Stewart and Christopher P. Wild

“This book from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization, provides a unique global view of cancer, including cancer patterns, causes, and prevention. The World Cancer Report series is recognized as an authoritative source of global perspective and information on cancer. The first volume appeared in 2003 and the second in 2008. This third volume in the series encompasses both established knowledge and recent research achievement.

World Cancer Report provides a professional, multidisciplinary assessment of all aspects of the geographical distribution, biology, etiology, prevention, and control of cancer, predicated on research. The concise nature of the text and the high graphic content (hundreds of colour maps, diagrams, and photographs) make the publication accessible to a broad readership. World Cancer Report is designed to provide non-specialist health professionals and policy-makers with a balanced understanding of cancer control and to provide established cancer professionals with insights about recent development.

The book includes chapters in which distinguished scientists from around the world provide a broad overview of established knowledge and then emphasize research activity and progress. In addition, text boxes distributed throughout the book provide short, in-depth discussions of selected questions or topics. A new feature of this volume is the inclusion of Perspectives considering the future development of different aspects of cancer research, written by those whose record of outstanding achievement qualifies them as individuals having unique vision.”

Press release: Global battle against cancer won’t be won with treatment alone. Effective prevention measures urgently needed to prevent cancer crisis – 3 February 2014

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Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence: why the National Lung Cancer Audit is the key to transforming lung cancer outcomes – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

Posted on January 30, 2014. Filed under: Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation, Oncology |

Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence: why the National Lung Cancer Audit is the key to transforming lung cancer outcomes – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

Report

 

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Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 10 January 2014

Posted on January 30, 2014. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Oncology | Tags: , |

Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer: Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 10 January 2014

National Cancer Policy Forum; Board on Health Care Services; A Livestrong and Institute of Medicine Workshop; Institute of Medicine.

“Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine’s National Cancer Policy Forum in July 2013 to facilitate discussion about gaps and challenges in caring for adolescent and young adult cancer patients and potential strategies and actions to improve the quality of their care. The workshop featured invited presentations from clinicians and other advocates working to improve the care and outcomes for the adolescent and young adult population with cancer.

Cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death in adolescents and young adults. Each year nearly 70,000 people between the ages of 15 and 39 are diagnosed with cancer, approximately 8 times more than children under age 15. This population faces a variety of unique short- and long-term health and psychosocial issues, such as difficulty reentering school, the workforce, or the dating scene; problems with infertility; cardiac, pulmonary, or other treatment repercussions; and secondary malignancies. Survivors are also at increased risk for psychiatric conditions such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and suicide and may have difficulty acquiring health insurance and paying for needed care. Identifying and Addressing the Needs of Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer discusses a variety of topics important to adolescent and young adult patients with cancer, including the ways in which cancers affecting this group differ from cancers in other age groups and what that implies about the best treatments for these cancer patients. This report identifies gaps and challenges in providing optimal care to adolescent and young adult patients with cancer and to discuss potential strategies and actions to address them.”

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Boosting Innovation and Cooperation in European Cancer Control. Key findings from the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer – 2013

Posted on December 18, 2013. Filed under: Oncology |

Boosting Innovation and Cooperation in European Cancer Control. Key findings from the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer – 2013

ISBN 978-961-6911-22-1

editors Jose M. Martin-Moreno, Tit Albreht, Sandra Radoš Krnel. – El. knjiga. – Ljubljana : National Institute of Public Health of the Republic of Slovenia ; Brussels : World Health Organization on behalf of the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies

 

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CAR Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards for Breast Imaging and Intervention – Canadian Association of Radiologists – 24 October 2013

Posted on October 25, 2013. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology | Tags: |

CAR Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards for Breast Imaging and Intervention – Canadian Association of Radiologists – 24 October 2013

News release

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Acute care toolkit 7: Acute oncology on the acute medical unit – Royal College of Physicians – October 2013

Posted on October 2, 2013. Filed under: Acute Care, Emergency Medicine, Oncology | Tags: |

Acute care toolkit 7: Acute oncology on the acute medical unit – Royal College of Physicians – October 2013

“Advances in cancer management continue to improve patient outcomes, but this has been accompanied by a steady increase in emergency admissions with disease- or treatment-related complications. The acute medical unit (AMU) currently shoulders much of this burden. Providing efficient and excellent care to this complex patient group in a busy AMU presents a key challenge. A good working partnership between the AMU and acute oncology service (AOS) can result in a significant improvement in patient care together with opportunities for admission avoidance and early discharge.”

Press release – Promoting better care for cancer patients with urgent medical problems

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Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis – Institute of Medicine – 10 September 2013

Posted on September 12, 2013. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Oncology | Tags: , |

Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis – Institute of Medicine – 10 September 2013

“In the United States, approximately 14 million people have had cancer and more than 1.6 million new cases are diagnosed each year. By 2022, it is projected that there will be 18 million cancer survivors and, by 2030, cancer incidence is expected to rise to 2.3 million new diagnoses per year. However, more than a decade after the IOM first studied the quality of cancer care, the barriers to achieving excellent care for all cancer patients remain daunting. Therefore, the IOM convened a committee of experts to examine the quality of cancer care in the United States and formulate recommendations for improvement. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis presents the committee’s findings and recommendations.

The committee concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to a growing demand for cancer care, increasing complexity of treatment, a shrinking workforce, and rising costs. Changes across the board are urgently needed to improve the quality of cancer care. All stakeholders – including cancer care teams, patients and their families, researchers, quality metrics developers, and payers, as well as HHS, other federal agencies, and industries – must reevaluate their current roles and responsibilities in cancer care and work together to develop a higher quality cancer care delivery system. Working toward the recommendations outlined in this report, the cancer care community can improve the quality of life and outcomes for people facing a cancer diagnosis.”

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Canadian Cancer Statistics – Canadian Cancer Society – 29 May 2013

Posted on May 31, 2013. Filed under: Oncology |

Canadian Cancer Statistics – Canadian Cancer Society – 29 May 2013

“This annual publication provides health professionals, researchers, policy-makers and the general public with detailed information about incidence, mortality and other statistics for the most common types of cancer by age, sex, year and province or territory. It is developed through collaboration between the Canadian Cancer Society, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Statistics Canada and provincial and territorial cancer registries with input from the Canadian Cancer Statistics Advisory Committee.”

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Cancer’s Hidden Price Tag: revealing the costs behind the illness – Macmillan Cancer Support – April 2013

Posted on April 22, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer’s Hidden Price Tag: revealing the costs behind the illness – Macmillan Cancer Support – April 2013

“Four in five cancer patients are hit with an average cost of £570 a month as a result of their illness. The gruelling physical and emotional impact of cancer is hard enough without the additional burden of money worries. Help our campaign to cut the cost of cancer.”

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Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy governance framework and audit tool – Healthcare Improvement Scotland – 10 April 2013

Posted on April 12, 2013. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy governance framework and audit tool – Healthcare Improvement Scotland – 10 April 2013

“Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy (SACT) encompasses both biological therapy (therapies which use the body’s immune system to fight cancer or to lessen the side effects that may be caused by some cancer treatments) and cytotoxic chemotherapy (a group of medicines containing chemicals directly toxic to cells preventing their replication or growth, and so active against cancer).

CEL 30 (2012) ‘[Revised] Guidance for the Safe Delivery of Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy’, published by the Scottish Government in July 2012 provides guidance on the safe delivery of SACT. The Systemic Anti Cancer Therapy working group, convened by Healthcare Improvement Scotland in September 2012, developed the Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy governance framework and audit tool to support the implementation of this guidance.

NHS boards will use the audit tool to self-assess SACT services by September 2013, following which a three-year rolling programme of peer review will be implemented, with results reported to the Scottish Cancer Taskforce through an expert review group.

This work forms part of the Medicines Strategy, and is linked to the Cancer Quality Performance Indicators (QPIs) programme.”

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Living With and Beyond Cancer: Taking Action to Improve Outcomes – Department of Health England – 29 March 2013

Posted on April 3, 2013. Filed under: Oncology |

Living With and Beyond Cancer: Taking Action to Improve Outcomes – Department of Health England – 29 March 2013

“This publication aims to support commissioners, commissioning support units and providers to take the necessary actions to improve cancer survivorship outcomes.

It sets out what has been learned about survivorship, including interventions to meet needs that have been tested and are ready to be spread across England. This includes the introduction of an integrated package of:

structured holistic needs assessment and care planning
treatment summaries
patient education and support events (Health and Wellbeing Clinics)
advice about, and access to, schemes that support people to undertake physical activity and healthy weight management”

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Alcohol and cancer: a report from the Alcohol Health Alliance UK – Royal College of Physicians – March 2013

Posted on March 25, 2013. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Oncology | Tags: , |

Alcohol and cancer: a report from the Alcohol Health Alliance UK – Royal College of Physicians – March 2013

“Alcohol and cancer draws on the latest research to explain the relationship between alcohol and cancer and why this is a problem that the UK needs to tackle now.

Alcohol is one of the most important preventable causes of cancer in the UK. The more a person drinks overall the higher their risk of developing cancer, yet even drinking within current guidelines can increase the risk for certain cancers. There is no level of drinking that can be considered ‘safe’ from the risk of cancer.

Despite these risks, the UK population continues to drink substantially more than we did 50 years ago. The solution is clear – reducing how much people drink overall will reduce their risk of cancer.

This report by the Alcohol Health Alliance UK draws on the latest research to explain the relationship between alcohol and cancer and why this is a problem that the UK needs to tackle now. It calls for the implementation of key strategies to lower the amount the UK population drinks as a whole and to support those who drink excessively to cut down.”

the report

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Urological cancers – why we need to change – NHS North East London and the City and NHS North Central London – January 2013

Posted on February 22, 2013. Filed under: Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Oncology, Urology |

Urological cancers – why we need to change – NHS North East London and the City and NHS North Central London – January 2013

Report

The clinical evidence

“We believe that the creation of single specialist centres and high quality local units will provide our patients with high quality diagnostic and therapeutic care and expand opportunities to develop research that benefits patients.”

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Delivering Affordable Cancer Care in the 21st Century – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 11 February 2013

Posted on February 14, 2013. Filed under: Health Economics, Oncology | Tags: , |

Delivering Affordable Cancer Care in the 21st Century – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 11 February 2013

“Spending on health care currently accounts for 18 percent of the United States’ GDP. By 2037, that percentage is expected to increase to 25 percent of GDP. This growth in health care spending is unsustainable, jeopardizes international economic competitiveness, and negatively impacts many national priorities, including investments in research, education, and infrastructure. Individuals are also burdened by rising healthcare costs, both in terms of medical expenses and stagnant wages. Despite these high expenditures for health care, health outcomes in the U.S. are not considerably better than other high-income countries.

Spending on cancer care in the U.S. is expected to increase because of the rapid influx of new cancer diagnoses as the population ages. In addition, as more expensive therapies and technologies become the standard of care, there are concerns that the costs of cancer treatment could begin to outpace health care inflation as a whole.

On October 8-9, 2012, the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop to examine the drivers of current and projected cancer care costs, as well as potential ways to curb these costs while maintaining or improving the quality of care. This document summarizes the workshop.”

full text

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Cancer in Australia: an overview 2012 r- AIHW – 11 December 2012

Posted on December 11, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer in Australia: an overview 2012 r- AIHW – 11 December 2012

“‘Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2012’ presents the latest available information on incidence, mortality, survival, prevalence, burden of cancer, hospitalisations and national cancer screening programs. It is estimated that the most commonly diagnosed cancers in 2012 will be prostate cancer, bowel cancer and breast cancer. For all cancers combined, the incidence rate increased by 12% from 1991 to 2009, but the mortality rate decreased and survival improved over time. Cancer outcomes differ by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, remoteness area and socioeconomic status.”

ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-386-2; Cat. no. CAN 70; 216pp

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Cancer patients in crisis: responding to urgent needs – Royal College of Physicians (RCP), Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) – 21 November 2012

Posted on November 22, 2012. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Oncology, Radiology | Tags: , |

Cancer patients in crisis: responding to urgent needs – Royal College of Physicians (RCP), Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) – 21 November 2012

full report 

“Emergency admissions for patients with cancer remain problematic despite the development of acute oncology. There is more that could be done to improve their care and subsequent experiences and outcomes.

Patients and their carers often have a lack of information about what to expect and who to contact when their condition suddenly worsens and requires urgent medical attention – this is often referred to as a crisis.  Cancer management is complex and involves a number of teams and there has been little emphasis on planning for potential problems.  More proactive care would ensure that patients, their carers and health professionals are better equipped to respond when a person becomes acutely unwell.

When admitted to hospital there is a need to improve decision-making, coordination of care and communication between professionals and – crucially – with patients themselves. In unplanned and urgent situations, patients themselves may receive confusing or conflicting information or feel less able to assert their concerns and wishes. Too often patients receive fragmented care. Patients are often seen by multiple healthcare professionals and sometimes multiple medical specialties during an admission.

This results in some patients being treated suboptimally, especially where the cancer diagnosis clouds other considerations in their management. Others, especially nearing the end of life, may undergo repeated investigations and interventions that are not to their benefit. Some admissions, especially among patients already approaching the end of life, may be avoidable.

This new report Cancer patients in crisis: responding to urgent needs from the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) and Royal College of Radiologists (RCR), including a foreword from Professor Sir Mike Richards, national clinical director for cancer, provides decision making tools to health professionals working in hospitals and the community, to help improve the care of cancer patients in crisis. It also proposes  standards of good practice in each care setting which should reduce risk and improve outcomes.

Patient and carer representative members of the working party have led on the development of an innovative planning wallet for patients. This is intended to encourage timely discussions about unexpected problems at any point in  a patient’s journey. It will prompt patients to seek and keep to hand important information and help to facilitate forward planning regarding their care.”

… continues on the media release site

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Patients’ experience of integrated care. A report from the Cancer Campaigning Group [UK] – 20 November 2012

Posted on November 21, 2012. Filed under: Oncology, Patient Participation | Tags: |

Patients’ experience of integrated care. A report from the Cancer Campaigning Group [UK] – 20 November 2012

Media release

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The Benefits and Harms of Breast Cancer Screening: An Independent Review – The Independent UK Panel on Breast Cancer Screening – October 2012

Posted on November 2, 2012. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

The Benefits and Harms of Breast Cancer Screening: An Independent Review – The Independent UK Panel on Breast Cancer Screening – October 2012  The Panel was chaired by Sir Michael Marmot.

Executive summary

Media release

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Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 1 November 2012

Posted on November 2, 2012. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Oncology | Tags: , , |

Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 1 November 2012

Full text

“Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, causing more than 440,000 deaths and resulting in $193 billion in health-related economic losses every year. In addition to causing cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, tobacco use is linked to the development of 18 different types of cancer and accounts for at least 30 percent of all cancer deaths and 80 percent of lung cancer deaths. Despite the widespread agreement on the dangers of tobacco use and considerable success in reducing the smoking rate by half since the first U.S. Surgeon General’s report on smoking in 1964, progress in reducing tobacco use has slowed in recent years. Today, nearly 19 percent of U.S. adults smoke, many of whom began smoking as adolescents or young adults. In addition, the use of new tobacco and nicotine products is on the rise, with unclear health consequences.

Recognizing that progress in combating cancer will not be fully achieved without addressing the tobacco problem, the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop June 11-12, 2012. The workshop examined current challenges in tobacco control and explored potential policy, outreach, and treatment strategies that could overcome these challenges and reduce tobacco-related cancer incidence and death. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Quarter of bowel cancer patients diagnosed after emergency admission to hospital – NHS – 2012

Posted on October 23, 2012. Filed under: Gastroenterology, Oncology | Tags: |

Quarter of bowel cancer patients diagnosed after emergency admission to hospital – NHS – 2012

“Bowel cancer care set to benefit from new advances in national audit data

About a quarter of bowel cancer patients in England are only diagnosed with the disease after an emergency admission to hospital, new advanced research from a national audit has found.

This equates to about 8,000 out of 31,000 patients admitted in a 12 month period, whose records were analysed by the National Bowel Cancer Audit and linked for the first time with hospital data (Hospital Episode Statistics).

These patients are less likely to have surgery than those whose first admission was not an emergency case according to today’s supplementary report, which was commissioned by the Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership and developed by the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, the Royal College of Surgeons of England and the Health and Social Care Information Centre.

Today’s finding about diagnosis upon emergency admission is in keeping with research6 by the National Cancer Intelligence Network about bowel cancer, which is diagnosed in about 31,000 people each year in England and Wales and is the second most common cause of cancer death.

The report suggests that between August 2009 and July 2010, diagnosis upon emergency admission was most common among:”

… continues on the site

Reports
http://www.ic.nhs.uk/bowelreports

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Breast cancer in Australia: an overview – AIHW – 9 October 2012

Posted on October 16, 2012. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Breast cancer in Australia: an overview – AIHW – 9 October 2012

“Data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of breast cancer in Australia including how breast cancer rates differ by geographical area, socioeconomic status, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status and country of birth.”

ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-355-8; Cat. no. CAN 67; 100pp

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It Takes a Team… a proposed national service improvement plan for gynaecological cancer services – NZ Ministry of Health – 29 August 2012

Posted on September 10, 2012. Filed under: Oncology |

It Takes a Team… a proposed national service improvement plan for gynaecological cancer services – NZ Ministry of Health – 29 August 2012

Report to the Ministry of Health on a proposed national service improvement plan for gynaecological cancer services.

“In 2010, the Ministry of Health commissioned a report into current gynaecological cancer services and the options for improvement. The report was developed in collaboration with the sector and under guidance from a working group nominated by the New Zealand Gynaecological Cancer Group.

Completed in July 2011, the report is intended to provide guidance to health service providers, funders and policy makers. It Takes a Team… Report to the Ministry of Health on a proposed national service improvement plan for gynaecological cancer services:”

… continues on the site

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Medical Oncology National Implementation Plan 2012/13 – NZ Ministry of Health – 6 September 2012

Posted on September 10, 2012. Filed under: Oncology |

Medical Oncology National Implementation Plan 2012/13 – NZ Ministry of Health – 6 September 2012

” Summary

The Medical Oncology Implementation Plan 2012/13 signifies the start of a process for increasing capacity and improving the delivery of medical oncology services in New Zealand. The plan outlines activities that can be undertaken in the 2012/13 fiscal year within current resource and fiscal constraints. While the majority of the activities in this plan are nationally led, district health boards (DHBs) are expected to work with the Ministry of Health to implement these activities at regional and local levels.

The plan will be updated annually. The Cancer Programme Steering Group will monitor its implementation.

The principles guiding this implementation plan are to:

maintain high quality of care and improve the quality of life for people with cancer
effectively, equitably and sustainably meet the future demand for medical oncology services, given the significant workforce and resource constraints that exist
ensure fiscal responsibility.”

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Informatics Needs and Challenges in Cancer Research – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 16 July 2012

Posted on July 17, 2012. Filed under: Health Informatics, Oncology, Research | Tags: , |

Informatics Needs and Challenges in Cancer Research – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 16 July 2012

Full text

“As information technology becomes an integral part of health care, it is important to collect and analyze data in a way that makes the information understandable and useful. Informatics tools – which help collect, organize, and analyze data – are essential to biomedical and health research and development.  The field of cancer research is facing an overwhelming deluge of data, heightening the national urgency to find solutions to support and sustain the cancer informatics ecosystem. There is a particular need to integrate research and clinical data to facilitate personalized medicine approaches to cancer prevention and treatment – for example, tailoring treatment based on an individual patient’s genetic makeup as well as that of the tumor – and to allow for more rapid learning from patient experiences.

To further examine informatics needs and challenges for 21st century biomedical research, the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop February 27-28, 2012. The workshop was designed to raise awareness of the critical and urgent importance of the challenges, gaps and opportunities in informatics; to frame the issues surrounding the development of an integrated system of cancer informatics for acceleration of research; and to discuss solutions for transformation of the cancer informatics enterprise. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Advanced outcomes – A discussion paper on how best to measure and capture outcomes for people with advanced cancer – Rare Cancers Foundation – 22 June 2012

Posted on July 3, 2012. Filed under: Oncology, Patient Participation | Tags: |

Advanced outcomes – A discussion paper on how best to measure and capture outcomes for people with advanced cancer – Rare Cancers Foundation – 22 June 2012

“The discussion paper has used an assessment of the NHS Outcomes Framework indicators and feedback from the RCF’s Patients’ Army to work out what matters to patients with advanced cancer and whether outcomes for this group of patients are represented within the health reforms. It also looks at the potential of current and future data sources to provide a mechanism for measuring outcomes in advanced cancer and proposes a series of measures that will improve the quality of information available on outcomes for advanced cancer.Importantly, it also suggests how improvements in these outcomes might be incentivised.”

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Advanced outcomes – A discussion paper on how best to measure and capture outcomes for people with advanced cancer – Rarer Cancers Foundation – 22 June 2012

Posted on June 25, 2012. Filed under: Oncology |

Advanced outcomes – A discussion paper on how best to measure and capture outcomes for people with advanced cancer – Rarer Cancers Foundation – 22 June 2012

“The Rarer Cancers Foundation has today published a discussion paper on measuring outcomes for patients with advanced forms of cancer. Improving outcomes is at the heart of the reforms to the health service and through Advanced outcomes – A discussion paper on how best to measure and capture outcomes for people with advanced cancer, the RCF aims to stimulate thinking on how best to measure outcomes for people with advanced cancer within the NHS.

The discussion paper has used an assessment of the NHS Outcomes Framework indicators and feedback from the RCF’s Patients’ Army to work out what matters to patients with advanced cancer and whether outcomes for this group of patients are represented within the health reforms. It also looks at the potential of current and future data sources to provide a mechanism for measuring outcomes in advanced cancer and proposes a series of measures that will improve the quality of information available on outcomes for advanced cancer.Importantly, it also suggests how improvements in these outcomes might be incentivised.”

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[US] Taskforce recommends against PSA test – ABC – 22 May 2012

Posted on May 22, 2012. Filed under: Oncology, Preventive Healthcare | Tags: , |

[US] Taskforce recommends against PSA test – ABC – 22 May 2012

“A high level US expert taskforce has caused a stir by recommending against the use of the PSA test to screen for prostate cancer in men, regardless of their age.

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) findings are published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

“The USPSTF concludes that there is moderate certainty that the benefits of PSA-based screening for prostate cancer do not outweigh the harms,” says the Task Force report. “The USPSTF now recommends against PSA-based screening for prostate cancer in all age groups.”

The PSA test is used to pick up cancers before symptoms occur, but many of these cancers are slow growing and would not become a problem in a man’s lifetime.”

… continues on the site

Annals of Internal Medicine links:

In the Balance: What the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Missed in Its Prostate Cancer Screening Recommendation
William J. Catalona et al
Annals of Internal Medicine 21 May 2012

In the Balance: Prostate Cancer Screening: What We Know, Don’t Know, and Believe
Otis W. Brawley
Annals of Internal Medicine 21 May 2012

Clinical Guidelines: Screening for Prostate Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement
Virginia A. Moyer et al
Annals of Internal Medicine 21 May 2012

Summaries for Patients: Screening for Prostate Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement
Annals of Internal Medicine 21 May 2012

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Computing cluster speeds targeted treatments for childhood cancer – Healthcare IT News – 18 May 2012

Posted on May 21, 2012. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Genomics, Oncology |

Computing cluster speeds targeted treatments for childhood cancer – Healthcare IT News – 18 May 2012

Mike Miliard, Managing Editor

“AUSTIN – Cloud-based research technology launched by Dell last year for the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) is gearing up for what’s billed as the world’s first precision medicine clinical trial for pediatric cancer.

James Coffin, vice president and general manager, Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences, says the eight-teraflop supercomputer, billed as the “kids cloud,” will drastically reduce the time required to identify personalized treatments for children participating in the trial program – kids who have no time to spare. In turn, that acceleration can help open the trials up to participation from more children.

The Human Genome Project “took $3 billion and 10 years” to sequence the first genome, he points out. “A year ago, it took about nine months and cost about $400,000 or $500,000 to do a full genome.”

And recently, says Coffin, “we just ran a test for a full genome for a patient, and got all the the results and made a clinical decision for the patient to the tumor board in less than five days.”

Dell has “done a lot of work to retune the codes and make them run really fast on this platform,” he says. “Just three months ago, the analysis of 25 million bases – there’s usually about 500 or 600 million bases you have to do to kind of do this whole genome sequence – and 25 million bases took about 48 hours.”

Now, that time is down to six hours.”

… continues on the site

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Cancer System Quality Index (CSQI) 2012 – Cancer Quality Council of Ontario – released 16 May 2012

Posted on May 18, 2012. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Oncology |

Cancer System Quality Index (CSQI) 2012 – Cancer Quality Council of Ontario – released 16 May 2012

Elements measured:

Safe
Effective
Accessible
Responsive
Equitable
Integrated
Efficient

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Improving Lung Cancer Outcomes Project (ILCOP) – Royal College of Physicians – 16 April 2012

Posted on April 18, 2012. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Oncology | Tags: , |

Improving Lung Cancer Outcomes Project (ILCOP) – Royal College of Physicians – 16 April 2012

“30 lung cancer teams across England have been working together to improve care for patients. The Improving Lung Cancer Outcomes Project (ILCOP), based at the Royal College of Physicians (RCP), and involving eight partner organisations*, brought the teams together to work collaboratively and share practice to improve the quality of care and patient experience for lung cancer patients.

Data from the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) had previously revealed variations in lung cancer outcomes across England. ILCOP was established to identify reasons for the variation in clinical (NLCA) outcomes as well as patient experience outcomes, which were collected through a specifically designed lung cancer patient questionnaire. The project used proven quality improvement measures to support the teams to make improvements and came up with an educational programme to spread the learning across the 30 teams and the wider lung cancer clinical community.

The project paired hospitals and multi-disciplinary teams, and encouraged them to visit each others’ services and review their processes. This collaborative approach allowed lung cancer teams to share practice, resulting in a variety of practical improvements to processes, the patient pathway, and patient experience, as detailed in the attached booklet.

Practical examples of quality improvement projects undertaken by ILCOP teams include the following:”

… continues on the site

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Cancer incidence projections, Australia 2011 to 2020 – AIHW – 9 March 2012

Posted on March 29, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer incidence projections, Australia 2011 to 2020 – AIHW – 9 March 2012

“This report presents detailed projections of cancer incidence in Australia for 2011 to 2020. These projections are based on trends in national cancer incidence data from 1982 to 2007. It shows the number of cases of cancer diagnosed in Australia each year is projected to rise over the next decade for both males and females, and is expected to reach about 150,000 in 2020, with prostate and breast cancer continuing to be the most common cancers diagnosed in men and women respectively.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-282-7; Cat. no. CAN 62; 156pp.

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Allied Health Professionals QIPP Toolkits – NHS – 14 March 2012

Posted on March 22, 2012. Filed under: Allied Health, Diabetes, Dietetics, Neurology, Oncology, Physiotherapy |

Allied Health Professionals QIPP Toolkits – NHS – 14 March 2012

“The Strategic Health Authority AHP Leads for England have worked with NHS London who compiled the AHP QIPP Toolkits These are designed to help commissioners design services that are of high quality whilst reducing cost. The Toolkits will be launched by Karen Middleton and Jim Easton at the kings Fund in London on March 19th Clinicians and provider organisations can use the toolkits to stimulate discussion and help planning. The NHS needs to find £20 billion pounds of savings through working transformationally. These toolkits show how AHPs are a vital part of that solution. The toolkits have been designed collaboratively with all 12 Allied Health Professional Bodies who endorsed their content and have been co produced in many areas with National clinical directors.”

AHP Stroke toolkit

AHP ONS toolkit – Oral Nutritional Support

AHP Musculoskeletal (MSK) care toolkit

AHP Cancer toolkit

AHP Diabetes toolkit

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NCI using HL7 to move clinical trial data – 1 March 2012

Posted on March 2, 2012. Filed under: Health Informatics, Oncology |

NCI using HL7 to move clinical trial data – 1 March 2012

“The National Cancer Institute is partnering with Health Level Seven, the Ann Arbor, Mich.-based nonprofit standards developer, to package clinical trial data using HL7 Clinical Data Architecture (CDA), allowing the information to be made available in patient EHRs.

The same HL7 standards are incorporated into EHRs to bring clinical trial data to the bedside. The HL7 CDA, a universal format for transmitting data between the clinical and public health sides of healthcare, will give providers a look at care provided to patients in clinical trials.

The announcement was made during the 2012 Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference in Las Vegas last week.”

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National Bowel Cancer Screening Program monitoring report: phase 2, July 2008- June 2011 – AIHW – 2 March 2012

Posted on March 2, 2012. Filed under: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Preventive Healthcare | Tags: , |

National Bowel Cancer Screening Program monitoring report: phase 2, July 2008- June 2011 – AIHW – 2 March 2012

“This report presents statistics on the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program for Australians invited to take part between July 2008 and June 2011. Just over 800,000 people were screened in that time, with about 60,000 found to require further assessment. One out of every 11 colonoscopies performed for further assessment detected and removed an advanced adenoma (pre-cancerous lesion), and a cancer was detected in 1 out of every 33 colonoscopies. However, this represents only a partial picture of outcomes due to incomplete reporting.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-280-3; Cat. no. CAN 61; 120pp

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Cancer Hospitalizations for Adults, 2009 [US] – Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP, pronounced “H-Cup”) – published February 2012

Posted on February 20, 2012. Filed under: Oncology |

Cancer Hospitalizations for Adults, 2009 [US] – Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP, pronounced “H-Cup”) – published February 2012

Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP, pronounced “H-Cup”) is a family of health care databases and related software tools and products developed through a Federal-State-Industry partnership and sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

“Introduction

Cancer is the leading cause of death among men and women under age 85.1 The most commonly diagnosed types of cancer for adult men are prostate, lung, and colorectal; for adult women, breast, lung and colorectal.2 Cancer death rates decreased by 22.2 percent in men and 13.9 percent in women between 1990-1991 and 2007, largely due to decreases in death rates for lung and prostate cancers among men, breast cancers among women, and colorectal cancers among both men and women. Decreased death rates for breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers during this time are largely attributable to improvements in early detection and treatment.3

This Statistical Brief presents data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample on hospital stays for cancer care among adults age 18 and older in 2009. Characteristics of these stays are compared by type of cancer and compared with adult hospitalizations for all other conditions. The most common cancer hospitalizations are identified and trends in the number of stays from 2000 to 2009 are displayed. Stays with a secondary diagnosis of cancer are enumerated, and the most frequent principal diagnoses for these stays are noted. All differences between estimates noted in the text are statistically significant at the 0.05 level or better.”

… continues on the site

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Delivering major breast surgery safely as a day case or one night stay (excluding reconstruction) – NHS Improvement – December 2011

Posted on January 6, 2012. Filed under: Oncology, Surgery | Tags: |

Delivering major breast surgery safely as a day case or one night stay (excluding reconstruction) – NHS Improvement – December 2011

“Why should major breast surgery be an inpatient procedure?

• It’s a relatively short operation
• Low post operative pain
• Patients can mobilise, eat anddrink early
• Rare post operative events
• Patients want to return to normal life as quickly as possible.

In 2007, NHS Improvement Transforming Inpatient Care Programme as part of the Cancer Reform Strategy (2007) and recently the Improving Cancer Outcomes Strategy (2011) redesigned the breast care surgical pathway (excluding reconstruction) with the working hypothesis that:
“Streamlining of the breast surgical pathway could reduce length of stay by 50% and release 25% of unnecessary bed days for 80% of major breast surgery (excluding reconstruction).” ”

… continues

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An intelligence framework for cancer – Department of Health [UK] – 13 December 2011

Posted on December 19, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

An intelligence framework for cancer – Department of Health [UK] – 13 December 2011

“High quality care is critical to improving cancer outcomes. While this country has many of the elements required to collect, analyse and publish information; there are also deficiencies in cancer intelligence. This document sets out plans to tackle these deficiencies and sets out aspirations.”

Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer – First Annual Report 2011 – Department of Health – 13 December 2011

“This report aims to help the reformed NHS deliver cancer outcomes that are amongst the best in the world and provides information on progress in 2011.”

Effective Cancer Commissioning in the New NHS – December 2011

All Party Parliamentary Group on Cancer

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An Evidence Review of Active Surveillance in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer – AHRQ – 6 December 2011

Posted on December 19, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

An Evidence Review of Active Surveillance in Men with Localized Prostate Cancer – AHRQ – 6 December 2011

“Active surveillance (AS) and watchful waiting (WW) are two observational followup strategies that forgo immediate therapy in patients with prostate cancer, with the goal of minimizing the morbidities and costs of immediate active treatment for men who may never develop cancer-related symptoms or who are interested in palliative treatments only. AS is curative in intent, and WW is palliative.”

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Counting the costs of cancer report – CLIC Sargent – December 2011

Posted on December 9, 2011. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Health Economics, Oncology |

Counting the costs of cancer report – CLIC Sargent – December 2011

“About the report
CLIC Sargent has published new research which found that many families have to bear significant additional financial costs as a result of supporting their child through their cancer diagnosis. Counting the costs of cancer reflects the experiences of young people aged 16-24, as well as parents, to understand the specific issues faced by children and young people with cancer.”

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The causes of cancer you can control – Cancer Research UK – 7 December 2011

Posted on December 8, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Preventive Healthcare |

The causes of cancer you can control – Cancer Research UK – 7 December 2011

“Can cancer be prevented? Decades of research have shown that a person’s chances of getting cancer depends on a mishmash of their genes and their environment, but also certain aspects of their lives, many of which they can control.

Today saw the publication of a landmark Cancer Research UK-funded review by Professor Max Parkin, outlining the latest evidence behind the preventable causes of UK cancers.”

… continues on the site

The review was published in Nature (open access)
The Fraction of Cancer Attributable to Lifestyle and Environmental Factors in the UK in 2010
includes:
The fraction of cancer attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors in the UK in 2010
1. The fraction of cancer attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors in the UK in 2010
2. Tobacco-attributable cancer burden in the UK in 2010
3. Cancers attributable to consumption of alcohol in the UK in 2010
4-7. Cancers attributable to dietary factors in the UK in 2010
8. Cancers attributable to overweight and obesity in the UK in 2010
9. Cancers attributable to inadequate physical exercise in the UK in 2010
10. Cancers attributable to exposure to hormones in the UK in 2010
11. Cancers attributable to infection in the UK in 2010
12. Cancers in 2010 attributable to ionising radiation exposure in the UK
13. Cancers attributable to solar (ultraviolet) radiation exposure in the UK in 2010
14. Cancers attributable to occupational exposures in the UK in 2010
15. Cancers attributable to reproductive factors in the UK in 2010
16. The fraction of cancer attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors in the UK in 2010

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Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach – Institute of Medicine – 7 December 2011

Posted on December 8, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach – Institute of Medicine – 7 December 2011

full text of the report 

“With more than 230,000 new cases of breast cancer expected to be diagnosed in the United States in 2011, many wonder about the role that environmental exposures may be playing. Susan G. Komen for the Cure® asked the IOM to review the current evidence on breast cancer and the environment, consider gene–environment interactions, review the research challenges, explore evidence-based actions that women might take to reduce their risk, and recommend directions for future research. Overall, the IOM finds that major advances have been made in understanding breast cancer and its risk factors, but more needs to be learned about its causes and how to prevent it. The report urges a life-course approach to studying breast cancer because new information suggests that women and girls might be more susceptible to some risk factors during certain life stages.

The committee defined “environment” broadly, and reviewed evidence on a range of factors women encounter in their daily lives. Of the environmental factors reviewed, those with the most consistent evidence of a link with increased breast cancer risk included ionizing radiation, combination estrogen-progestin hormone therapy, and greater postmenopausal weight. More physical activity was linked to reduced risk. But for many other factors, the evidence from human studies is more limited, contradictory, or absent.

The IOM concludes that women may have some opportunities to reduce their risk of breast cancer through personal actions, such as avoiding unnecessary medical radiation throughout life, avoiding use of estrogen –progestin hormone therapy, avoiding smoking, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing physical activity, and, for postmenopausal breast cancer, minimizing weight gain. In addition to applying a life-course approach to studies of breast cancer, research recommendations include developing improved tools for epidemiologic research and testing of chemicals and other substances, developing effective preventive interventions, developing better approaches to modeling breast cancer risks, and improving communication about breast cancer risks. Questions about the topics addressed in the report are explored in the Questions and Answers booklet.”

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BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2008-2009 – AIHW – 6 December 2011

Posted on December 6, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Preventive Healthcare | Tags: , |

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2008-2009 – AIHW – 6 December 2011

“BreastScreen Australia aims to reduce morbidity and mortality from breast cancer through organised breast cancer screening. This report presents national statistics for the program. More than 1.3 million women aged 50-69 participated in BreastScreen Australia in 2008-2009, equivalent to around 55% of the target age group. Deaths from breast cancer are at an historic low at 47 deaths per 100,000 women aged 50-69 in 2007.”

ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-261-2; Cat. no. CAN 60; 98pp

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Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia – AIHW – 1 December 2011

Posted on December 6, 2011. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia – AIHW – 1 December 2011

‘Cancer in adolescents and young adults in Australia’ presents the latest available incidence, survival and mortality statistics on cancer in young Australians aged 15 to 29. The incidence of cancer in this age group has become steady since the mid-1990s while cancer mortality has fallen between 1983 and 2007. Survival from cancer in adolescents and young adults has been relatively high and has improved with time, although cancer outcomes vary across population groups.

ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-233-9; Cat. no. CAN 59; 102pp

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Accelerating progress against cancer: ASCO’s blueprint for transforming clinical and translational cancer research – American Society of Clinical Oncology – November 2011

Posted on December 2, 2011. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Oncology, Research |

Accelerating progress against cancer: ASCO’s blueprint for transforming clinical and translational cancer research – American Society of Clinical Oncology – November 2011

“This report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology lays out a vision for an approach to clinical and translational cancer research that takes full advantage of today’s scientific and technological opportunities. If bold action is taken to achieve this vision, we can realize major new advances in cancer prevention,  detection and treatment and improve the care of patients.”

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Stratified Medicine Programme – Cancer Research UK – 21 November 2011

Posted on November 28, 2011. Filed under: Genomics, Oncology |

Stratified Medicine Programme – Cancer Research UK – 21 November 2011

“A new initiative to develop ‘personalised cancer treatment’ has today been launched. The experimental project has been designed to develop a screening program to test tumours for key genetic changes. It is hoped that in the future the results of such tests would influence treatment programmes, helping doctors choose the best drug for each person.

The new initiative, called the Stratified Medicine Programme, is being led by Cancer Research UK, the UK Technology Strategy Board and the pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and Pfizer. It is hoped that the work will lay the foundations for genetic testing of both patients and tumours to become standard practice, allowing the use of specialised drugs that target specific genes and mutations that can cause or influence the development of cancer.

In addition to laying the foundations for a genetic testing service, the information collected during the programme may be useful for research into new treatments; for example, by identifying new targets and by seeing how genetics affect people’s responses to various cancer drugs. Although people taking part in the early stages of this programme are unlikely to directly benefit, it is hoped that in the long-term, patients will be provided with individually tailored treatments that ultimately prove more effective.

What is the project looking at?”

… continues on the site

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National Thoracic Surgery Activity & Outcomes Report 2011 – Royal College of Surgeons – 3 November 2011

Posted on November 14, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Respiratory Medicine, Surgery |

National Thoracic Surgery Activity & Outcomes Report 2011 – Royal College of Surgeons – 3 November 2011

“The number of lung cancer patients benefiting from life-saving surgery has shot up by 60 per cent while the operative mortality rate has halved in recent years as a new generation of specialist lung surgeons start to come through into the NHS. In the last year alone the number of lung cancer operations has increased by more than 17 per cent. These are among the findings of a comprehensive new audit from the Society for Cardiothoracic surgery (SCTS). The study also finds that new scanning technology has led to more accurate decisions on which patients could benefit from an operation; but points to the need for more training in minimally-invasive techniques.

The report, the National Thoracic Surgery Activity & Outcomes Report 2011, tracks the results of more than 400,000 operations from 1980 to 2010 and includes hospital-specific data for the past three years. Among the findings are:”

… continues on the site

The report in full text

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Lung cancer in Australia in 2011: an overview – AIHW – 4 November 2011

Posted on November 4, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Respiratory Medicine | Tags: |

Lung cancer in Australia in 2011: an overview – AIHW – 4 November 2011

“Data in this report provide a comprehensive picture of lung cancer in Australia including how lung cancer rates differ by geographical area, socioeconomic status, Indigenous status and country of birth.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-222-3; Cat. no. CAN 58; 194pp

Media release: Lung cancer rates up for women, down for men, survival slightly better

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Cervical screening in Australia 2008-2009 – AIHW – 31 October 2011

Posted on October 31, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Cervical screening in Australia 2008-2009 – AIHW – 31 October 2011

“The National Cervical Screening Program aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Cervical screening in Australia 2008-2009 presents national statistics monitoring the NCSP using new performance indicators. For women in the target age group, 20-69 years, participation in the program was around 59%, with more than 3.6 million women screened over the 2 years 2008-2009. Cervical cancer incidence remains at an historical low of 9 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.”
ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN 978-1-74249-216-2; Cat. no. CAN 57; 136pp

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An Implementation Plan for the Guidance for Improving Supportive Care for Adults with Cancer in New Zealand – Health Outcomes International – 2011

Posted on October 27, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

An Implementation Plan for the Guidance for Improving Supportive Care for Adults with Cancer in New Zealand – Health Outcomes International – 2011

Health Outcomes International Pty Ltd. 2011. An Implementation Plan for the Guidance for Improving Supportive Care for Adults with Cancer in New Zealand. Auckland: Health Outcomes International Pty Ltd.

“Summary of publication

The Ministry of Health contracted with Health Outcomes International (HOI) in April 2010 to develop a plan to implement the Guidance for Improving Supportive Care for Adults with Cancer in New Zealand.

As part of the project methodology, the following three priority areas were identified:
care co-ordination
psychosocial support
information support.

HOI then undertook further research of these three areas including an electronic stocktake survey, key informant interviews and targeted literature reviews. Based on the research a set of immediate and ‘realistic’ actions along with longer-term ‘aspirational’ actions have been proposed in the attached implementation plan.

The research findings are documented in greater detail in the accompanying report Implementing Supportive Care Guidance Project: Priority Areas Research Report.

The recommendations outlined in the implementation plan will be prioritised and used to inform the Ministry, Regional Cancer Networks, District Health Boards and Non-governmental Organisations annual work plans over the next five years.”

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Noninvasive Diagnostic Techniques for the Detection of Skin Cancers – AHRQ – September 2011

Posted on October 24, 2011. Filed under: Dermatology, Health Technology Assessment, Oncology | Tags: |

Parsons SK et al   Noninvasive Diagnostic Techniques for the Detection of Skin Cancers. Technical Brief No. 11.  (Prepared by the Tufts University Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-2007-1055-1.) AHRQ Publication No. 11-EHC085-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. September 2011.

Structured Abstract
Background. Cancers of the skin are the most common forms of cancer. Timely diagnosis and treatment are critical to reducing the rates of morbidity and mortality. Newer noninvasive imaging technologies may assist with earlier detection.
Objective. To provide an objective description of noninvasive imaging modalities in diagnosing cancerous tumors of the skin, to proffer an analytic framework for assessing the applications of the imaging modalities, to summarize the state of ongoing research, and to delineate future research needs.
Methods. We searched the MEDLINE® database for English-language literature published between 1990 and March 2011 for selected noninvasive imaging  technologies. We included all publications types and study designs. We extracted data solely from relevant abstracts. Our search also included grey literature  (manufacturers’ Web sites, Food and Drug Administration’s relevant databases, and ClinicalTrials.gov), and incorporated expert input from our key informants.  devices were classified as in general clinical use, limited clinical use, or investigational use, based on all available information.
Findings. We screened in 629 abstracts that were relevant to the noninvasive imaging technologies of interest. Only 11 abstracts were on randomized controlled trials. Of the devices in general clinical use, we found a total of 51 abstracts on photography and 433 on dermoscopy. Of note, only one abstract reported clinical outcomes. None of the abstracts reported adverse events. Photography is principally used in specialty and subspecialty settings (i.e., oncology) and while widely used by dermatologists, dermoscopy is still not used in primary care. We did not identify any consistent guidelines for the assessment of suspicious skin lesions. Devices in limited clinical use are principally used in research settings. Available literature was limited for these devices as well as those still considered investigational.
Summary. A review of the literature reveals predominant use of noninvasive devices by dermatologists with limited diffusion of this technology in primary care. When compared with the use of biopsy, future research is needed to evaluate the test accuracies, clinical impact, and the potential adverse events associated with the use of noninvasive imaging technologies.”

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Investment in Research on Survivorship and Palliative and End-of-Life Care, 2005–2008: A Special Report from the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance’s Survey of Government Voluntary Sector Investment in Cancer Research – September 2011

Posted on September 23, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Palliative Care, Research | Tags: |

Investment in Research on Survivorship and Palliative and End-of-Life Care, 2005–2008: A Special Report from the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance’s Survey of Government Voluntary Sector Investment in Cancer Research – September 2011

Canadian Cancer Research Alliance (2011). Investment in Research on Survivorship and Palliative and End-of-Life Care, 2005–2008: A Special Report from the Canadian Cancer Research Alliance’s Survey of Government Voluntary Sector Investment in Cancer Research. Toronto: CCRA.

ISBN 978-0-9866841-4-2 (print) / ISBN 978-0-9866841-5-9 (PDF)

Extract from the introduction

“This report focuses on yet another special topic, cancer survivorship and palliative and end-of-life care. It is the first to quantify investment in these two related areas of research. The framework used to classify the research was developed specifically for this report and is detailed in the next chapter. It allows the investment to be stratified by subcategories of research and tracked over time.   …
Cancer survivorship research and palliative and end-of-life care research are relatively new and emerging fields. We hope that the findings on the relative research investment in survivorship and palliative and end-of-life care in Canada will give funders key information to help them identify critical research gaps, enabling future investments to be strategically directed.”

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Study for Survival – Pancreatic Cancer UK – 7 September 2011

Posted on September 16, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

Study for Survival – Pancreatic Cancer UK – 7 September 2011

“Outcomes for pancreatic cancer patients in the UK fall well below acceptable levels according to Pancreatic Cancer UK’s Study for Survival.  The Study is the UK’s first comprehensive review of pancreatic cancer, and draws on the experience of over 1,000 people living and working with the disease.

The Study for Survival report, which has been published today, highlights that five year survival rates are amongst the worst in the world for UK pancreatic cancer patients.  This is compared to patients living in other EU countries as well as the US, Australia and Canada. In some instances, like Canada and Australia, differences in reported survival rates are double those of the UK.

The Study publishes data that points towide variation in survival rates at cancer network level across England. This includes the numbers of patients referred for specialist treatment and receiving life saving surgery. It suggests that despite the fact that 20% of patients are potentially eligible for life-saving surgery, in reality only 10% of patients are treated in this way. Furthermore, the Study reports thatpancreatic cancer patients have the least satisfactory health service experience of all patients diagnosed with major cancers. 

The Study also found thatover 50% of patients are experiencing symptoms up to 12 months prior to diagnosis.  This often involves five or more visits to their GPand suggests the needs for a far greater focus on early diagnosis, particularly how GPs can be provided with the symptoms information and diagnostic/risk assessment tools they need.

The report concludes that there is anurgent requirement to address the many shortcomings in the pancreatic cancer patient experience. This includes a range of actions, including an immediate call to increase UK focus and investment in pancreatic cancer research.”

… continues on the site

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Guidelines for the ethical management of people with advanced chronic or terminal conditions in the final months of life – NHMRC – 8 September 2011

Posted on September 9, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Patient Participation | Tags: , |

Guidelines for the ethical management of people with advanced chronic or terminal conditions in the final months of life – NHMRC – 8 September 2011
ISBN: 1864965258

“Many people of all ages are diagnosed with chronic or terminal conditions every year.

If you are an individual in this situation or a health practitioner providing care for someone in this situation, the guidance and framework documents on this page may assist with the difficult ethical deliberations around the care you are receiving or providing.

The framework is intended for health professionals and has been designed to guide deliberations over ethical aspects of providing care at the transition phase of a patient’s journey through an advanced chronic or terminal condition, including cancer.

The guide is intended for patients (of all ages), families and carers and has been designed to facilitate what can be difficult conversations about ethically related issues which arise at this time of transition e.g. preferred type and place of care – hospice, hospital, or home.

Both the framework and the guide identify key ethical principles and values relevant to the last twelve months or so of life for those with an advanced chronic or terminal condition making the transition to palliative care. The documents pose some questions which can be explored at any stage of this transition whether as patients, health professionals, family or carers.

They also provide additional resources via web-links to assist health professionals, patients, carers or family members to access further information and advice for deliberations about the ethical aspects of the palliative care being provided.”

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“A whispered sort of stuff”. A community report on research around Aboriginal people’s beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care in Western Australia – Cancer Council Western Australia – 2011

Posted on September 9, 2011. Filed under: Aboriginal TI Health, Oncology |

“A whispered sort of stuff”. A community report on research around Aboriginal people’s beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care in Western Australia – Cancer Council Western Australia – 2011

Sandra C Thompson, Shaouli Shahid, Heath S Greville, Dawn Bessarab
ISBN 1 876628 50 2

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Cancer Australia Strategic Plan 2011-2014 – 26 August 2011

Posted on August 31, 2011. Filed under: National Health Strategies, Oncology |

Cancer Australia Strategic Plan 2011-2014 – 26 August 2011

“Cancer Australia has released its Strategic Plan 2011-2014, to provide leadership and direction at a time of increasing cancer incidence. The Strategic Plan was launched by the Hon Nicola Roxon, Minister for Health and Ageing, on 26 August 2011.

The Strategic Plan will focus on fostering collaboration and engagement across the health system, building the knowledge base in cancer and seeking to shape the effectiveness of cancer control programs at a national level.”  … continues on the site

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Nations divided? – An assessment of variations in access to cancer treatments for patients in England, Scotland and Wales – Rare Cancers Foundation – August 2011

Posted on August 31, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

Nations divided? – An assessment of variations in access to cancer treatments for patients in England, Scotland and Wales – Rare Cancers Foundation – August 2011

“This report reveals the extent of cross-border inequalities in access to cancer treatments. It finds that patients in Wales are five times less likely to gain access to newer cancer drugs than those in England and in Scotland, the likelihood is three times less than English patients.”

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Cancer Campaigning Group (CCG) publishes vision for future of cancer services [UK] – 25 August 2011

Posted on August 29, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

Cancer Campaigning Group (CCG) publishes vision for future of cancer services [UK] – 25 August 2011

“The CCG has today published six documents setting out our vision for the future of cancer services.  The documents are available here:

■Public health and prevention
■Early diagnosis
■Treatment and services
■Survivorship
■Commissioning
■Research”

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The future of cancer networks. Policy recommendations as a result of a joint seminar held at the Kings Fund – July 2011

Posted on August 23, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

The future of cancer networks.  Policy recommendations as a result of a joint seminar held at the Kings Fund – July 2011

Extract from the background:

“Cancer networks have made a significant contribution to cancer services over the last 15 years. They have been a valued channel for communication and an important route for engagement and coordination across the healthcare system, including at the level of multidisciplinary clinical teams. They have led efforts to ensure the implementation of clinical guidance (the Improving Outcomes Guidance), have supported the translation of national policy into local action in areas such as cancer waiting times, and have helped commissioners to identify population needs and set service specifications for providers.

However, they have also had weaknesses. Their success in catalysing local action has varied considerably, and they have not always been able to get all local PCTs or all local providers to work together successfully to coordinate essential improvements such as centralising specialist services. Looking to the future of cancer networks, therefore, it will be important to find ways to capitalise on and support what works well and address what could be improved.”

 

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The Patient-Centred Care project: Evaluation report – King’s Fund – 11 August 2011

Posted on August 22, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Patient Participation | Tags: |

The Patient-Centred Care project: Evaluation report – King’s Fund – 11 August 2011

“The Patient-Centred Care Project, an evidence-based co-design (EBCD) project, that aimed to improve the experience and quality of care for patients receiving treatment for breast cancer and lung cancer at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Supported by King’s College London and The King’s Fund, it was funded by Guy’s & St Thomas’ Charity.

This independent evaluation report, commissioned by the Fund, describes the process and impact of the EBCD project within breast cancer services (the first phase of the project). It presents a summary of the findings, including:

the process of evidence-based co-design
the key successes, outcomes and impact of the project
the lessons learned during the project
the solutions implemented in response to the project’s findings.”

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Adult cancers near overhead powerlines – Interim Report – 25 July 2011

Posted on August 8, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion |

Adult cancers near overhead powerlines – Interim Report – 25 July 2011
Paul Elliott et al
Centre for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College London

“The aim of the study was to investigate the risk of adult cancers (leukemia, brain/central nervous system cancers, malignant melanoma and female breast cancer) in relation to distance and extremely low frequency calculated magnetic fields within 1000m from high voltage overhead power lines, England and Wales, 1974-2008. Using a case-control design, the study was based on adult cancer cases aged 15-74 years identified through the national cancer registry and age-sex-year of cancer registration matched cancer controls (three controls/case except breast cancer, one control/case).”

 

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Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century – Institute of Medicine Workshop Summary – released 22 July 2011

Posted on July 25, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Research | Tags: |

Implementing a National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century – Institute of Medicine Workshop Summary – released 22 July 2011
Full text

“The Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program, supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), works to advance patient care and research through studies of new cancer treatments, methods of cancer prevention and early detection, and rehabilitation during and after treatment. According to the 2010 IOM report A National Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century: Reinvigorating the NCI Cooperative Group Program, the Cooperative Groups’ research has significantly improved cancer prevention and treatment measures. Currently, the Group involves more than 3,100 institutions and 14,000 investigators who enroll more than 25,000 patients in clinical trials each year. Despite such broad participation, the Cooperative Group Program’s ability to undertake medical practice-changing clinical trials is threatened by declining funding, inefficient processes, and extensive government oversight.

The IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum and the American Society of Clinical Oncology held a workshop on March 21, 2011, in Washington, DC, to pursue ways to achieve the goals and implement the recommendations from the 2010 IOM report. Speakers discussed how to work toward the report’s goal of increasing the efficiency and productivity of the clinical trials system. The workshop included panels on a variety of topics, such as efforts to consolidate the existing Cooperative Groups, public-private collaboration, funding, and ensuring broad involvement of patients and healthcare providers in the clinical trials system. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Management of Early Colorectal Cancer – NZ Ministry of Health – June 2011

Posted on July 7, 2011. Filed under: Gastroenterology, Oncology |

Management of Early Colorectal Cancer – NZ Ministry of Health – June 2011

“Summary of publication

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers registered and the second most common cause of death from cancer in New Zealand. The new evidence-based guideline Management of Early Colorectal Cancer funded by the Ministry of Health and developed by the New Zealand Guidelines Group, provides guidance for secondary and tertiary care practitioners on delivering best practice care.

It was commissioned by the Ministry as part of its commitment to the implementation of the Cancer Control Strategy. It follows the publication of evidence-based guidelines for the management of melanoma, early breast cancer and suspected cancer in primary care.

This new guideline fits within a broader suite of guidelines and programmes developed to support health professionals to care for people with colorectal cancer in New Zealand.

Management of Early Colorectal Cancer specifically addresses the management of people with invasive adenocarcinoma of the colon or rectum and has been prepared to meet the evidence needs of secondary and tertiary providers of colorectal care. It assumes the patient has already been referred because of suspicious bowel symptoms or has undergone initial testing in primary care. It covers the clinical pathway from preoperative assessment to appropriate intervention and includes recommendations for follow-up. Content includes guidance on elective surgery for colon and rectal cancer, emergency surgery for bowel obstruction, adjuvant therapy, as well as general guidance to facilitate coordinated and patient-centred care.

It should be noted that the management of people with more advanced colorectal cancer (including metastatic disease) at diagnosis or later and people with high-risk familial colorectal cancer syndromes are beyond the scope of this guideline, so these cancers have been excluded. Squamous cell carcinomas have also been excluded. Colorectal cancerscreening in asymptomatic people or the prevention of colorectal cancer in the general population is also beyond the scope of this guideline.”

ISBN numbers: 978-1-877509-41-4 (print), 978-1-877509-40-7(online)

HP number: 5296

Citation: New Zealand Guidelines Group. 2011. Management of Early Colorectal Cancer – Evidence-based Best Practice Guidelines. Wellington: New Zealand Guidelines Group.

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National Head and Neck Cancer Audit – UK – May 2011

Posted on June 29, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

National Head and Neck Cancer Audit – UK – May 2011

“The sixth annual report from the National Head and Neck Cancer Audit – which now contains more than 20,000 patient records and covers about 95 per cent of all cases in England and Wales – has been published today.

Covering the period of November 2009 to October 2010, the report looks at the care of patients with head and neck cancer – one of the less common cancers which often requires very complex treatment – and makes recommendations to trusts based on its findings. “

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Inequity in cancer care: a global perspective – International Atomic Energy Agency – 2011

Posted on June 28, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Inequity in cancer care: a global perspective – International Atomic Energy Agency – 2011

Extract from the foreword:

“This publication focuses on the issue of inequality (disparity) as it applies to cancer care in general, and access to prevention, screening, palliative and treatment services in particular. The problem of inequality in access to radiation oncology services is addressed in detail. Access to cancer care and radiotherapy services for women and children is specifically considered, reflecting the currently published literature.

The report is aimed at radiotherapy professionals, health programme managers and decision makers in the area of cancer control. It was developed to create awareness of the role of socioeconomic inequality in access to cancer care, and to eventually mobilize resources to be equitably  allocated to public health programmes in general, and to cancer control and radiotherapy programmes in particular.”

 

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Patient-Centered Cancer Treatment Planning: Improving the Quality of Oncology Care – Summary of a Workshop – Institute of Medicine – 13 June 2011

Posted on June 14, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Patient-Centered Cancer Treatment Planning: Improving the Quality of Oncology Care – Summary of a Workshop – Institute of Medicine – 13 June 2011

Full text

“The life-threatening nature of cancer and the complexity of cancer treatment options, each with its own set of potential risks and benefits, make it difficult for people with cancer to make decisions about their care. In addition, cancer care usually involves multiple specialties, impeding the coordination of care and development of comprehensive treatment plans. A cancer treatment plan can provide a roadmap to help patients navigate their uncertain path. A treatment plan is a written document that informs everyone—the patient, his or her family, and other treating physicians—about the path of care and who is responsible for each portion of that care. However, most providers lack the tools, time, and resources needed to efficiently and effectively prepare such plans with their patients.

The IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop February 28-March 1, 2011, to discuss ways to create a more coordinated, patient-centered cancer treatment planning process. Speakers and participants representing patients, providers, nonprofits, and other groups identified a number of obstacles to achieving patient-centered care planning in practice, including poor communication between patients and providers, and a lack of adequate reimbursement for the time needed to develop, discuss, and document a treatment plan.  Workshop participants also suggested a variety of approaches for addressing these challenges. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Community Cancer Support Services Pilot Project Evaluation – NZ – 31 May 2011

Posted on May 31, 2011. Filed under: Community Services, Oncology |

Community Cancer Support Services Pilot Project Evaluation – NZ – 31 May 2011

“Summary of publication

In 2008, the Ministry of Health commissioned Health Outcomes International to evaluate three community cancer support pilots. The pilot projects aimed at reducing inequalities in cancer access and outcomes for Māori and people living in rural areas …
The services were based on international evidence suggesting that community-level cancer services may be effective in supporting more vulnerable populations to better understand, access and navigate the health system. They were built on a ‘patient navigator’ model of healthcare and aim to reduce barriers to cancer service access and care. They also aim to educate local communities about available health and social support services.” … continues on the site

ISBN number: 978-0-478-37475-9 (online)
Health Outcomes International. 2011. Community Cancer Support Services Pilot Project Evaluation. Wellington: Ministry of Health.

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Cancer System Quality Index 2011 – Cancer Quality Council of Ontario

Posted on May 27, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Oncology |

Cancer System Quality Index 2011 – Cancer Quality Council of Ontario 

“The Cancer Quality Council of Ontario (CQCO) advises Cancer Care Ontario and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care in their efforts to improve the quality of cancer care in the province.

We also monitor and publicly report on the performance of the cancer system, and provide international comparisons and benchmarking so Ontario can learn from other jurisdictions.”

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Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy – AHRQ – May 2011

Posted on May 23, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Radiology | Tags: |

Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy – AHRQ – May 2011

Tipton KN, Sullivan N, Bruening W, Inamdar R, Launders J, Uhl S, Schoelles K.
Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.
Technical Brief No. 6. (Prepared by ECRI Institute Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. HHSA-290-02-0019.) AHRQ Publication No. 10 (11)-EHC058-EF.
Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. May 2011.

“Objectives. Conduct a systematic literature scan for published data for the treatment of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and provide a broad overview of the current state of SBRT for solid malignant tumors.”

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Cancer in Canada: Framing the Crisis and Previewing the Opportunity for Donors – Charity Intelligence Canada – April 2011

Posted on April 29, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: , |

Cancer in Canada: Framing the Crisis and Previewing the Opportunity for Donors – Charity Intelligence Canada – April 2011
Greg Thomson, Karen Greve Young

“This report was created to answer the question of what has happened to the billions of dollars given in Canada in the name of cancer over the past couple of decades. Ci believes that with an understanding of what has happened in the past, we can best understand how to give with impact today.

Ci believes that rather than hoping for a “cure”, funders should think strategically about how their donations can best change the cancer landscape.

Ci has identified four cancers that are underfunded relative to their deadly impact on Canadians: pancreatic, stomach, lung and colorectal. These cancers represent an opportunity for donors to make real impact by filling a tragic funding gap.”

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Web App Advances Personalized Cancer Treatment – InformationWeek – 14 April 2011

Posted on April 19, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

Web App Advances Personalized Cancer Treatment
A collaboration between the American Society of Oncology and CollabRX may bring individualized therapy to the masses.
By Marianne Kolbasuk McGee InformationWeek

“How individual cancer patients respond to treatment depends in part on the patient’s medical history, therapies they’ve already tried, whether the cancer has spread, and their tumor’s molecular makeup. A free Web-based application aims to help patients get more personalized treatments and provide doctors with more timely cancer research information.

That’s good news, especially for patients who don’t live close to major cancer centers and for oncologists who don’t have sophisticated IT tools or research resources.

The Targeted Therapy Finder–Melanoma application is the fruit of collaboration between the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and CollabRX, a company launched about three years ago by Jay Tenenbaum, a melanoma survivor, tech entrepreneur, and former chief scientist at Commerce One.

While the app for melanoma is the first tool being offered, the collaboration between CollabRX and ASCO could lead to decision support tools for other cancers as well, Tenenbaum said.” …  continues on the site

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Report card on cancer in Canada : 2011 to 2011 – Cancer Advocacy Coalition of Canada – April 2011

Posted on April 18, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Report card on cancer in Canada : 2011 to 2011 – Cancer Advocacy Coalition of Canada – April 2011

Contents:
The Cancer Patient’s Challenging Journey
Advocacy
Open Letter to Physicians – Alberta Health Services
Walking the Tightrope: Physician Advocacy and Institutional Fidelity
Cancer Prevention in Canada: The Sooner the better – Joseph Ragaz
Updates on Prevention and Rare Cancers
Living With Cancer
Waiting Times – Pierre Major
Should Clinical Trials be Part of “Standard of Care”? – Susan Dent et al
The Role of the Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Pharmacist – Jonathan Edwards et al
Bone Marrow Transplantation: Improving Outcomes for Canadian Patients – Ronan Foley
Personalized Medicine: What is Missing? – Jennifer Levin Carter et al.
The 21-Gene Assay: Canada’s Uneven Response – Joseph Ragaz

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Manual for Cancer Services – UK – updates 7 April 2011

Posted on April 14, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: , , , |

Manual for Cancer Services: acute oncology – including metatastic spinal cord compression measures – UK – 7 April 2011

Author: Department of Health
Following a three month consultation period, this is the final version of the acute oncology measures for inclusion in the Manual of Cancer Services 2008.

AND

Manual for Cancer Services: Network Service User Partnership Group Measures – UK – 7 April 2011

Author: Department of Health
Following a three month consultation period, this is the final version of the Network Service User Partnership Group Measures for inclusion in the Manual of Cancer Services 2008.

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How to reduce excess mortality from cancer: Guide for Health and Well-being Boards and GP Commissioning Consortia – NHS National Cancer Action Team – 18 March 2011

Posted on March 29, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Preventive Healthcare | Tags: |

How to reduce excess mortality from cancer: Guide for Health and Well-being Boards and GP Commissioning Consortia – NHS National Cancer Action Team – 18 March 2011

“This concise guide describes how to improve outcomes for cancer by raising public awareness of the symptoms and promoting early diagnosis.

The report explains what data are available to help identify whether an area has more preventable deaths than other areas, what is causing the problem, and how to design interventions to address it.

The report draws on work by the Health Inequalities National Support Team (HINST) and NCAT in the 60 areas with the worst health and highest levels of deprivation in England.”

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Vanderbilt Launches Cancer Decision Support Tool – 17 March 2011

Posted on March 21, 2011. Filed under: Genomics, Oncology |

Vanderbilt Launches Cancer Decision Support Tool

My Cancer Genome Web site will collect information about genetic mutations that impact different cancers and link to targeted research on treatment options.
By Nicole Lewis InformationWeek
March 17, 2011 02:09 PM

“Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) has launched the nation’s first personalized cancer decision-support Web site that will collect and distribute information about the expanding list of genetic mutations that impact different cancers, as well as provide links to research documents on various treatment options based on specific mutations.

The online tool, My Cancer Genome, is linked to Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s StarPanel electronic medical record (EMR) database, giving physicians the ability to cross-reference patients’ medical histories, lab results, medications, and other medical information with online data that tracks the latest developments in personalized cancer medicine and clinical research.”

…continues on the InformationWeek site

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NHS treated cancer patients receiving major surgical resections – March 2011

Posted on March 21, 2011. Filed under: Oncology, Surgery |

NHS treated cancer patients receiving major surgical resections – March 2011

“This initial report on major surgical resections in England presents the percentage of NHS treated cancer patients who received a major resection as part of their treatment. The report contains results for thirteen cancer sites and covers patients diagnosed during 2004-2006 who were followed up to 2007. Percentages are presented by sex, age, deprivation quintile and cancer network, with funnel plots depicting both percentages and indirectly age-standardised ratios by cancer network. Cancer networks have been assigned by the residence of patients at time of diagnosis. These data provide a basis to instigate further exploration of major surgical resections for cancer patients and to encourage improved recording and sharing of data to allow further analyses to be produced.”

A post on the Cancer Research UK Science Update Blog also discusses this work.

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Delivering the Cancer Reform Strategy – 24th Report of the UK Parliament Public Accounts Committee – 1 March 2011

Posted on March 4, 2011. Filed under: National Health Strategies, Oncology |

Delivering the Cancer Reform Strategy  – 24th Report of the UK Parliament Public Accounts Committee – 1 March 2011

Extract from the summary

“Each year in England, around 255,000 people are diagnosed with cancer and around 130,000 die from the disease. The NHS spent £6.3 billion on cancer services in 2008-09. Tackling Cancer has been a priority for the Department of Health (the Department) since its ten year NHS Cancer Plan was published in 2000. In 2007 the Department published its five year Cancer Reform Strategy (the Strategy) to deliver improved patient outcomes.

Over the last ten years, the NHS has made significant progress in delivering important aspects of cancer services, with falling mortality rates and consistent achievement of the cancer waiting times targets. Since publication of the Strategy in 2007, improvements have also been made in reducing the average length of stay and numbers of patients treated as day cases. A significant increase in resources has contributed to these improvements, but the progress has also been achieved through clear direction and high profile leadership underpinned by strong performance management linked to waiting times and mortality targets.

We welcome the Department’s and NHS’s commitment to improving the outcomes for cancer patients. We are concerned, however, that early diagnosis does not happen often enough; whilst cancer survival rates have improved and mortality rates have fallen, the gap in survival rates between England and the best European countries has not been closed. There remain wide, unexplained variations in the performance of cancer services and in the types of treatment available across the country.

It is disappointing that ten years after the publication of the NHS Cancer Plan 2000 there remain significant gaps in information about important aspects of cancer services, in particular information on chemotherapy, on follow-up treatment, and on the stage that a patient’s cancer has reached at the time of diagnosis. The Department can not yet measure the impact of the Strategy on key outcomes, such as survival rates, and does not know if it is commissioning cancer services cost-effectively, due to poor data on costs and because outcomes data are not sufficiently timely.”

…continues

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Primary cause? An audit of the experience in primary care of rarer cancer patients – Rarer Cancers Foundation – February 2011

Posted on March 4, 2011. Filed under: Oncology |

Primary cause? An audit of the experience in primary care of rarer cancer patients – Rarer Cancers Foundation – February 2011

“Late diagnosis of cancer is a major explanation for poor outcomes. If a person is diagnosed with cancer at an early stage, then they will have a greater range of treatment options which are often less invasive and offer a better chance of a positive
long term outcome.   …

Over one in four patients with a rarer cancer were first diagnosed following an emergency, indicating that their cancer had already spread significantly. This supports the findings of our survey that over one quarter of patients were first diagnosed with Stage three or four cancer.”

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National Cancer Policy Summit – Summary of a Meeting of the National Cancer Policy Forum – 28 February 2011

Posted on March 1, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

National Cancer Policy Summit – Summary of a Meeting of the National Cancer Policy Forum – 28 February 2011
Institute of Medicine (IOM)

“Technological advances are altering the way cancer research is conducted and care is delivered to cancer patients. Many targeted therapies are being developed to match the unique molecular changes in patients’ tumors.  In addition, cancer research increasingly is an international endeavor involving patients, researchers, and practitioners worldwide. At the same time, cancer research budgets are shrinking, and the cost of care is growing.

The National Cancer Policy Forum brought together leaders in the cancer community at the National Cancer Policy Summit on October 25, 2010, to identify and discuss these and other changes in research and care. The Summit featured presentations and discussions that explored emerging policy issues in cancer research, health care reform, cancer care delivery, public health needs, and cancer control. Participants suggested many potential actions to improve information technologies in health care; define new and financially sustainable models for cancer care; provide more patient-centered cancer care; and foster greater precompetitive collaboration. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Red meat link to bowel cancer warning – Department of Health [UK] – 25 February 2011

Posted on February 28, 2011. Filed under: Dietetics, Gastroenterology, Oncology |

Red meat link to bowel cancer warning – Department of Health [UK] – 25 February 2011

“People who eat a lot of red and processed meat are being advised for the first time to consider cutting down to help reduce the risk of bowel cancer, the Department of Health announced today.

The advice follows the publication of a new report, from the independent expert Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), which reviewed the evidence on the links between red and processed meat and bowel cancer. It concludes that red and processed meat probably increases the risk of bowel cancer and people who eat around 90g or more should consider cutting down to reduce their risk.”  [The Iron and Health Report]

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Nanotechnology and Oncology – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 25 February 2011

Posted on February 28, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: , |

Nanotechnology and Oncology – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 25 February 2011

“One of the challenges in treating cancer is the disease’s complexity. Cancer emerges and behaves differently in each patient, and the same treatment may be effective in one patient and ineffective in another. Nanotechnology in medicine—also known as nanomedicine—has the potential to overcome these and other challenges in cancer care. Nanotechnology could improve diagnostic imaging to detect cancer earlier and locate it more accurately; direct treatments more accurately to cancer cells and avoid causing harm to healthy ones; and create new tools for cancer prevention.

The National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop July 12-13, 2010, to explore what nanomedicine is, what it can do, its potential risks and benefits, and how it should be regulated. Discussions focused on the use of nanotechnology in oncology and cancer research; research and development of new cancer nanomedicine; risk management; and nanontechnology and the public. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections [US] – January 2011

Posted on January 21, 2011. Filed under: Health Economics, Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections [US] – January 2011

“New NIH study projects survivorship and costs of cancer care based on changes in the US population and cancer trends.

Based on growth and aging of the U.S. population, medical expenditures for cancer in the year 2020 are projected to reach at least $158 billion (in 2010 dollars) — an increase of 27 percent over 2010, according to a National Institutes of Health analysis. If newly developed tools for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up continue to be more expensive, medical expenditures for cancer could reach as high as $207 billion, said the researchers from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the NIH. The analysis appears online, Jan. 12, 2011, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.”

Cancer Prevalence and Cost of Care Projections – National Cancer Institute site

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Clinical Nurse Specialists in Cancer Care; Provision, Proportion and Performance A census of the cancer specialist nurse workforce in England 2010 – NHS National Cancer Action Team – December 2010

Posted on January 20, 2011. Filed under: Nursing, Oncology | Tags: |

Clinical Nurse Specialists in Cancer Care; Provision, Proportion and Performance A census of the cancer specialist nurse workforce in England 2010 – NHS National Cancer Action Team – December 2010

“The 2010 Census of Cancer Specialist Nurses in England was commissioned by the National Cancer Action Team (NCAT) and supported by the Workforce Review Team (WRT), now the Centre for Workforce Intelligence (CfWI). This work builds on previous censuses carried out in 20071 and 20082 conducted to map the specialist nurse workforce in cancer care and to help inform commissioning of specialist nurse posts in a more structured and equitable fashion than had previously been possible.”  … continues

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Improving outcomes: a strategy for cancer – UK Department of Health – 12 January 2011

Posted on January 18, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Improving outcomes: a strategy for cancer – UK Department of Health – 12 January 2011

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Cancer in Australia 2010: an overview – AIHW – December 2010

Posted on January 11, 2011. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

Cancer in Australia: an overview, 2010 provides a comprehensive overview of national statistics on cancer in Australia. The report presents the latest available statistics on cancer overall, as well as on many individual types of cancers, and it includes information on incidence, mortality, survival, prevalence, burden of cancer, hospitalisations, and national cancer screening programs.

Authored by AIHW.

Published 16 December 2010; ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN-13 978-1-74249-082-3; AIHW cat. no. CAN 56; 228pp

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Manual for Cancer Services 2008: Psychological Support Measures – UK – 20 August 2010

Posted on August 23, 2010. Filed under: Oncology |

Manual for Cancer Services 2008: Psychological Support Measures

Author: UK Department of Health
Published date: 20 August 2010
Pages: 30

“Following a three month consultation, the final Psychological Support Measures are published for inclusion in the Manual for Cancer Services.”

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Draft Acute Oncology: Measures for the Manual for Cancer Services – UK – 19 August 2010

Posted on August 20, 2010. Filed under: Oncology |

Draft Acute Oncology: Measures for the Manual for Cancer Services

Author: UK Department of Health
Published date: 19 August 2010

This letter from Stephen Parsons, Director, National Cancer Action Team, highlights the publication of a draft version of the Acute Oncology Measures which is being issued today for a three month consultation period.

Download letter (PDF, 50K)

Consultation document: Draft Acute Oncology Measures

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Global Economic Cost of Cancer – 16 August 2010

Posted on August 20, 2010. Filed under: Health Economics, Oncology | Tags: |

Global Economic Cost of Cancer

“On August 16, the American Cancer Society and LIVESTRONG® released the Global Economic Cost of Cancer report summary. This report, authored by Society researchers Rijo M. John, Ph.D., director of international tobacco control research, and Hana Ross, Ph.D., strategic director of international tobacco control research, is a first-of-its-kind study on the economic cost of all causes of death globally, including cancer and other noncommunicable diseases and communicable diseases. The report shows that cancer has the greatest economic impact from premature death and disability of all causes of death worldwide. The economic toll from cancer is nearly 20 percent higher than heart disease, the second leading cause of economic loss ($895 billion and $753 billion respectively). This figure does not include direct medical costs, which would further increase the overall economic impact of cancer. Dr. John Seffrin will deliver the report highlights during a dinner jointly hosted by the American Cancer Society and LIVESTRONG at the 2010 UICC World Cancer Congress in Shenzhen, China.”

DOWNLOAD The Global Economic Costs of Cancer report summary. [PDF version, 408 KB]

American Cancer Society and LIVESTRONG Global Economic Cost of Cancer press release.

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BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 – AIHW – 13 August 2010

Posted on August 20, 2010. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: |

BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 – AIHW – 13 August 2010

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

“Breast cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in Australian women. BreastScreen Australia monitoring report 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 is the tenth report presenting national statistics (combining data from the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 reporting periods) on key program activity, performance and outcome indicators for BreastScreen Australia, which aims to reduce mortality and morbidity from breast cancer through detecting cancers early. Since BreastScreen Australia commenced in 1991, mortality from breast cancer has decreased steadily. Further, more than half of all invasive breast cancers detected by BreastScreen Australia are small, with small breast cancers associated with increased treatment options and improved survival.”

Published 13 August 2010; ISSN 1039-3307; ISBN-13 978-1-74249-043-4; AIHW cat. no. CAN 51; 105pp

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What are nurse sensitive patient outcomes in ambulatory chemotherapy? – Policy+ 26 – Issue 26 August 2010

Posted on August 12, 2010. Filed under: Nursing, Oncology |

What are nurse sensitive patient outcomes in ambulatory chemotherapy? – Policy+ 26 – Issue 26 August 2010

“Since the Next Stage Review, the development of quality measures has continued apace. While the new government is abandoning process based targets, their emphasis on outcomes raises further challenges for specialist nursing services to demonstrate their contribution. This Policy+ outlines the findings and implications of a review undertaken by the National Nursing Research Unit investigating nurse sensitive patient outcomes in ambulatory chemotherapy.”

National Nursing Research Unit – publications

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Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Radiotherapy Treatments for Head and Neck Cancer – AHRQ – 2010

Posted on August 3, 2010. Filed under: Oncology | Tags: , |

Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Radiotherapy Treatments for Head and Neck Cancer

Press release  Advanced Type of Cancer Radiation Reduces Side Effects, but Impact on Controlling Cancer Is Unclear

AHRQ = Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US]

“An advanced type of cancer radiation is more successful than traditional radiation in avoiding “dry mouth” when treating head and neck cancers, but it is unknown whether the treatment is better or worse at reducing the size of tumors, according to a new AHRQ comparative effectiveness review.  The report finds that intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) leads to fewer cases of xerostomia, commonly known as dry mouth, than other types of radiation.  Xerostomia, a potential side effect to radiation when salivary glands are damaged, can affect basic functions like chewing, swallowing and breathing; senses such as taste, smell and hearing; and can significantly alter a patient’s appearance and voice.  However, the report did not find evidence that IMRT is more successful than any other kind of radiation therapy in reducing tumors.  Many scientists consider IMRT to be theoretically better able to target cancerous cells while sparing healthy tissues, but more research is needed.  The comparative effectiveness review, Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Radiotherapy Treatments for Head and Neck Cancer, was authored by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield (BC/BS) Association, Technology Evaluation Center in Chicago.”

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