Nephrology

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts: prevalence and incidence – AIHW – 19 November 2014

Posted on November 20, 2014. Filed under: Cardiol / Cardiothor Surg, Diabetes, Health Status, Nephrology | Tags: |

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Australian facts: prevalence and incidence – AIHW – 19 November 2014

“Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease—Australian facts is a series of 5 reports by the National Centre for Monitoring Vascular Diseases at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare that describe the combined burden of cardiovascular disease (including coronary heart disease and stroke), diabetes and chronic kidney disease. This report on prevalence and incidence provides a comprehensive summary of the latest available data on the prevalence and incidence in the Australian population of these three chronic vascular diseases, acting alone or together. It examines age and sex characteristics and variations across population groups, by geographical location, and by socioeconomic disadvantage.”

ISSN ISSN 2204-1397; ISBN 978-1-74249-662-7

Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease affect over a quarter of Australians – AIHW – 19 November 2014

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Assessment of the coding of ESKD in deaths and hospitalisation data: a working paper – AIHW – 16 October 2014

Posted on October 21, 2014. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Assessment of the coding of ESKD in deaths and hospitalisation data: a working paper – AIHW – 16 October 2014

“Monitoring the impact of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is important in planning for future health needs of the population. This working paper uses linked data from Western Australia and New South Wales to assess the likelihood that a patient who is hospitalised with ESKD will have ESKD recorded on their death record, in order to establish whether mortality records in Australia reflect the actual disease pattern of people with ESKD. The study confirms that the ESKD codes used in the mortality data to estimate ESKD incidence are likely to underestimate the impact of ESKD—there is a high proportion of patients who are hospitalised with ESKD who do not have ESKD recorded on their death certificates.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-650-4; Cat. no. PHE 182; 60pp

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Projections of the prevalence of treated end-stage kidney disease in Australia 2012-2020 – AIHW – 6 June 2014

Posted on June 11, 2014. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Projections of the prevalence of treated end-stage kidney disease in Australia 2012-2020 – AIHW – 6 June 2014

“End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is the most severe form of chronic kidney disease with patients usually requiring kidney replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or kidney transplantation to survive. Projections of the prevalence of treated end-stage kidney disease in Australia presents national level projections of the number of people receiving kidney replacement therapy for their ESKD for the period 2012 to 2020. This information is important for predicting the future burden of ESKD in Australia.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-578-1; Cat. no. PHE 176; 59pp

Media release: Dialysis and kidney transplantation demand could rise by at least 45% over the next decade – AIHW – June 2014

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Patient safety alert on standardising the early identification of Acute Kidney Injury – NHS England – 9 June 2014

Posted on June 11, 2014. Filed under: Diagnostics, Nephrology |

Patient safety alert on standardising the early identification of Acute Kidney Injury – NHS England – 9 June 2014

“A patient safety alert has been issued today (9 June 2014) by NHS England on standardising the early identification of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). The alert has been issued to all NHS acute trusts and foundation trusts providing pathology services.

A national algorithm, standardising the definition of AKI has now been agreed. This provides the ability to ensure that a timely and consistent approach to the detection and diagnosis of patients with AKI is taken across the NHS.

This algorithm has been endorsed by NHS England and it is recommended that the algorithm is implemented across the NHS. When integrated into a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) the algorithm will identify potential cases of AKI from laboratory data in real time and produce a test result. The laboratory system will then send the test result, using existing IT connections to patient management systems.”

… continues on the site

Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) Algorithm

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Living with Kidney Disease – NZ Ministry of Health – 18 April 2013

Posted on April 18, 2013. Filed under: Nephrology |

Living with Kidney Disease – NZ Ministry of Health – 18 April 2013

“Kidney disease is a serious, long-term medical condition that touches the lives of many New Zealanders, but to the average person it is a confusing and complex subject. It can be very frightening for a person to learn from their doctor that their kidneys have stopped working properly, and that they may soon need dialysis treatment and perhaps a kidney transplant.

This document provides a source of authoritative, accurate information for New Zealand kidney disease patients and their families.”

ISBN 978-0-478-40239-1 (print); 978-0-478-40240-7 (online)

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Chronic Kidney Disease in England: The Human and Financial Cost – NHS Kidney Care – 6 August 2012

Posted on August 28, 2012. Filed under: Health Economics, Nephrology |

Chronic Kidney Disease in England: The Human and Financial Cost – NHS Kidney Care – 6 August 2012

“England’s £1.4 billion price tag for kidney disease

Kidney disease costs the NHS more than breast, lung, colon and skin cancer combined, yet too many cases remain undiagnosed and untreated, according to a report published today by NHS Kidney Care.

The report, which is summarised today (6 August) in in the medical journal Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation has found that chronic kidney disease (CKD) costs the NHS in England more than £1.4bn each year.

This is more than the combined NHS spend on breast, lung, colon and skin cancer (£1.37 billion), according to the full-length study Chronic Kidney Disease in England: The Human and Financial Cost

Treating kidney disease, including complications such as heart disease and stroke, swallows up £1 in every £77 spent by the NHS in England.

Nearly half of this sum is spent on renal replacement therapy, yet many people are not receiving help to tackle the disease in its earlier stages when it could prevent the need for expensive dialysis or transplant.”

… continue on the site

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Dialysis and kidney transplantation in Australia: 1991-2010 – AIHW – 19 July 2012

Posted on July 19, 2012. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Dialysis and kidney transplantation in Australia: 1991-2010 – AIHW – 19 July 2012

“End-stage kidney disease is a serious and costly health problem in Australia that usually requires kidney replacement therapy (dialysis or kidney transplantation) for patients to survive. At the end of 2009 there were more than 18,000 people receiving kidney replacement therapy. The majority received dialysis treatment, which accounted for more than 1.1 million hospitalisations in the 2009-10 financial year. During 2009 more than 2,300 patients started kidney replacement therapy and 772 kidney transplant operations were performed.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-322-0; Cat. no. PHE 162; 52pp

Media release: Large increase in treated end-stage kidney disease

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NQF Endorses Renal Measures – National Quality Forum [US] – 2 April 2012

Posted on April 10, 2012. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

NQF Endorses Renal Measures – National Quality Forum [US] – 2 April 2012

…”the National Quality Forum (NQF) Board of Directors has approved for endorsement 12 quality measures on renal care. The measures address a range of care concerns, for chronic kidney disease, end stage renal disease, and dialysis treatment.

For this project, NQF endorsed measures focused on care concerns such as mortality rates for facility dialysis patients, and hemoglobin levels in chronic kidney disease patients. NQF also endorsed measures related to vascular access and minimum dose with dialysis treatment and lipid profiles in chronic kidney disease patients. In all, 33 measures were evaluated against NQF’s endorsement criteria by a panel of providers, measurement experts, and consumer representatives; 12 measures were endorsed.”

Endorsed Measures

Mortality
0369: Dialysis Facility Risk-adjusted Standardized Mortality Ratio (CMS)

Anemia
1666: Patients on Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agent (ESA)–Hemoglobin Level>12.0 g/dL (AMA-PCPI)
1667: (Pediatric) ESRD Patients Receving Dialysis: Hemoglobin Level<10g/dL 13 (AMA-PCPI)

Cardiovascular
1668: Laboratory Testing (Lipid Profile) (AMA)

Dialysis Adequacy
0249: Hemodialysis Adequacy Clinical Performance Measure III: Hemodialysis Adequacy–HD Adequacy–Minimum Delivered Hemodialysis Dose (CMS)
0323: Hemodialysis Adequacy: Solute (AMA-PCPI)
0318: Peritoneal Dialysis Adequacy Clinical Performance Measure III – Delivered Dose of Peritoneal Dialysis Above Minimum (CMS)
0321: Peritoneal Dialysis Adequacy: Solute (AMA-PCPI)

Mineral Metabolism
0255: Measurement of Serum Phosphorus Concentration (CMS)

Vascular Access
0251: Vascular Access—Functional AVF or AV Graft or Evaluation for Placement (Kidney Care Quality Alliance)
0256: Hemodialysis Vascular Access- Minimizing use of catheters as Chronic Dialysis Access (CMS)
0257: Hemodialysis Vascular Access- Maximizing Placement of Arterial Venous Fistula (AVF)

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Getting it right: End of life care in advanced kidney disease – NHS Kidney Care – March 2012

Posted on March 16, 2012. Filed under: Nephrology, Palliative Care | Tags: |

Getting it right: End of life care in advanced kidney disease – NHS Kidney Care – March 2012

“This document brings together the experiences and learning from three project groups that have been working over the last two years to implement the framework for end of life care in advanced kidney disease. It also addresses the data items that are associated with managing end of life care.”

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Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 1–3: Screening, Monitoring, and Treatment – Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US] – January 2012

Posted on February 9, 2012. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Nephrology | Tags: |

Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 1–3: Screening, Monitoring, and Treatment – Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US] – January 2012

“Structured Abstract

Objective. The objective was to systematically review and synthesize evidence regarding benefits and harms of screening for and monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 1–3.

Data Sources. The data sources were MEDLINE® and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews electronic databases, hand searches of references from relevant systematic reviews and eligible trials, and references from expert consultants.

Review Methods. We screened abstracts and full text articles of identified references for eligibility and reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for evidence on benefits and harms of CKD treatments. We reviewed RCTs and observational studies for evidence regarding possible benefits and harms of CKD screening or monitoring. For all included RCTs, data were extracted, quality was rated, and strength of evidence was graded. Evidence on the benefits and harms of CKD treatments was quantitatively synthesized when possible. Additional evidence on CKD screening and monitoring was qualitatively described.

Results. We found no RCTs of CKD screening or monitoring. In treatment RCTs, several interventions significantly reduced clinical events. In patients with proteinuria, nearly all with diabetes and hypertension, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) (relative risk [RR], 0.60, 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.43 to 0.83) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) (RR 0.77, 95 percent CI, 0.66 to 0.90) significantly reduced risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) versus placebo. In patients with microalbuminuria who had cardiovascular disease or diabetes with other cardiovascular risk factors, ACEI treatment reduced mortality risk (RR 0.79, 95 percent CI, 0.66 to 0.96) versus placebo. In individuals with hyperlipidemia and impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or creatinine clearance, HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) reduced risk of mortality (RR 0.80, 95 percent CI, 0.68 to 0.95), myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke compared with placebo. However, limited data addressed whether these effects differed between patients with and without CKD or as a function of CKD severity. In RCTs that directly compared different treatments, including high dose versus low dose, combination versus monotherapy, and strict versus standard control, it was unclear whether intensification of treatment improves clinical outcomes. Reporting of study withdrawals and adverse events was limited. Based on treatment RCT findings and additional indirect data, including high CKD prevalence, low CKD recognition and limited CKD monitoring in usual care, uncertain sensitivity of screening and monitoring measures for CKD, and insufficient evidence on CKD screening and monitoring harms, the overall benefits of CKD  screening and monitoring are unclear. The likelihood of benefit, if present, appears to be greater in specific subgroups. For example, individuals not being treated with ACEIs or ARBs who have cardiovascular disease or diabetes combined with other cardiovascular risk factors may benefit from screening for albuminuria. Individuals not being treated with a statin who have hyperlipidemia and no cardiovascular disease may benefit from screening for impaired eGFR. Younger patients, and those without diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, or obesity, are the least likely to benefit from CKD screening. Individuals with impaired eGFR and at high risk for cardiovascular complications who are not being treated with ACEIs or ARBs may benefit from monitoring for incident  albuminuria.

Conclusions. No trials directly show a benefit for CKD screening or monitoring. The likelihood of benefit, if present, appears to be greater in specific subgroups. Screening and monitoring harms are poorly described. In selected CKD patients, ACEI or ARB treatment reduces ESRD risk, ACEI treatment reduces mortality risk, and statin treatment reduces risk of mortality, MI, and stroke. Many of these patients may already warrant treatment with these therapies regardless of CKD status. Many knowledge gaps remain, and additional research should increase understanding regarding optimal approaches to CKD screening, monitoring, and treatment. ”

Citation:

Fink HA, Ishani A, Taylor BC, Greer NL, MacDonald, R, Rossini D, Sadiq S, Lankireddy S, Kane RL, Wilt TJ. Chronic Kidney Disease Stages 1–3: Screening, Monitoring, and Treatment. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 37. (Prepared by the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. HHSA 290-2007-10064-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 11(12)-EHC075-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. January 2012. http://www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/reports/final.cfm

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Rethinking the Fairness of Organ Transplants – Harvard Business School – 28 November 2011

Posted on November 29, 2011. Filed under: Nephrology |

Rethinking the Fairness of Organ Transplants – Harvard Business School – 28 November 2011

“A proposal out of Harvard and MIT to rethink how kidney transplants are allocated could result in a fairer system giving patients longer lives.

The new empirical model, which is intensely data driven, would provide a flexible framework to policymakers responsible for deciding which potential recipients get organs as they become available—decisions that must be based on various priority and fairness criteria.

“The new system will explicitly give points based on the likelihood of survivability.”The method—the work of Nikolaos Trichakis of Harvard Business School and Dimitris Bertsimas and Vivek F. Farias, both of MIT’s Sloan School—can help policy designers create the most equitable point system based on their chosen constraints and criteria. They detail the proposed model in a new paper, Fairness, Efficiency and Flexibility in Organ Allocation for Kidney Transplantation.

In early simulations, the model suggests that life-year expectancies for the program can be increased by up to 8 percent, depending on variables plugged into the process.”  … continues on the site

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Chronic kidney disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – AIHW – 16 September 2011

Posted on September 22, 2011. Filed under: Aboriginal TI Health, Nephrology | Tags: |

Chronic kidney disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – AIHW – 16 September 2011

“This report presents the first detailed analysis of chronic kidney disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and how it compares to non-Indigenous Australians. Indigenous Australians have a greater burden of disease for many health conditions, and chronic kidney disease is no exception. Indigenous Australians were found to be more likely to have end-stage kidney disease, and be hospitalised or die with chronic kidney disease than non-Indigenous Australians.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-203-2; Cat. no. PHE 151; 74pp

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Projections of the incidence of treated end-stage kidney disease in Australia, 2010-2020 – AIHW – 14 September 2011

Posted on September 15, 2011. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Projections of the incidence of treated end-stage kidney disease in Australia, 2010-2020 – AIHW – 14 September 2011

“This report presents projections of the incidence of end-stage kidney disease treated with dialysis or kidney transplantation (treated ESKD) for the period 2010 to 2020. This information is important for health service planning and resource allocation in the future. The projections are made by sex at national and state/territory levels, and for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients with diabetes when commencing treatment. The incidence of treated ESKD is projected to continue to rise over the next decade; increasing by nearly 80% between 2009 and 2020. The proportion of those commencing ESKD treatment with diabetes is also expected to increase, from 45% in 2009 to 64% in 2020.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-201-8; Cat. no. PHE 150; 64pp

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Improving the standard of care of children with kidney disease through paediatric nephrology networks – August 2011 – NHS Kidney Care – August 2011

Posted on September 6, 2011. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Nephrology |

Improving the standard of care of children with kidney disease through paediatric nephrology networks – NHS Kidney Care – August 2011
Report of a working party of Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, British Association for Paediatric Nephrology, NHS Kidney Care

Contents
1. The case for change
2. What is a network?
3. Current structures for delivery of care
3.1 Overall structure
3.2 Population bases
3.3 Access to service
3.4 Inter-relationships with other services
3.5 Patient and carer involvement
3.6 Information technology
3.7 Research and audit
4. Commissioning
5. Quality Standards
5.1 Clinical competences
5.2 Disease specific referral criteria
5.3 Disease specific quality standards
6. Workforce Planning
6.1 Tertiary paediatric nephrologists
6.2 Paediatricians with a special interest in paediatric nephrology (SPIN)
6.3 Link paediatricians6.4 Paediatric renal nurses
6.5 Dieticians
6.6 Other allied health professionals
7. References

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National Kidney Care Audit Vascular Access Report 2011 [UK] – 2011

Posted on August 8, 2011. Filed under: Nephrology |

National Kidney Care Audit Vascular Access Report 2011 [UK] – 2011

Extract from the introduction

“This is the third report of the National Kidney Care Audit for Vascular Access presenting the findings from the 2010 data collection period for patients starting dialysis between the 1st January and 30th June 2010.
The Vascular Access audit provides information on the timely and appropriate surgery for permanent vascular access based on the recommendations of the standards and quality requirements stated in the National Service Framework (NSF) for Renal Services.

The central aims of the audit are to determine the performance of renal centres across England, Wales and Northern Ireland in the use of optimal vascular access for haemodialysis, to measure the burden of vascular access and to explore operational issues in providing access.

The principle audit questions, analysed on a national, network and where appropriate individual unit level, were:
• Does the proportion of patients starting haemodialysis with functioning permanent access meet Renal Association and Vascular Society Guidelines for permanent vascular access?
• What are the health care associated infection (HCAI) rates associated with vascular access in an incident haemodialysis population and how does this compare with the national average and the best performance?” 

… continues

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End-stage kidney disease in Australia: total incidence, 2003-2007 – AIHW – 21 June 2011

Posted on June 23, 2011. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

End-stage kidney disease in Australia: total incidence, 2003-2007 – AIHW – 21 June 2011

“The incidence of end-stage kidney disease is an important indicator of the health of the Australian population and valuable for healthcare planning. In the past we have been limited to counting only individuals treated with dialysis or transplant. However it is recognised that many people with end-stage kidney disease might not receive these treatments for a variety of reasons. This report presents a new method for counting the total incidence of end-stage kidney disease which also includes those not treated with dialysis or transplant. This method indicates that for every new case treated with dialysis or transplant there is one that is not, although the vast majority of these are elderly.”

ISBN 978-1-74249-178-3; Cat. no. PHE 143; 60pp.

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Chronic kidney disease quality standard – NICE UK – 15 March 2011

Posted on March 18, 2011. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Chronic kidney disease quality standard – NICE UK – 15 March 2011

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Treatment of End-Stage Organ Failure in Canada, 2000 to 2009 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 20 January 2010

Posted on January 21, 2011. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: , |

Treatment of End-Stage Organ Failure in Canada, 2000 to 2009 – Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) – 20 January 2011

“The number of Canadians living with kidney failure, otherwise known as end-stage renal disease (ESRD), has been steadily increasing for 20 years, but rates now appear to be stabilizing, according to a new report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI).

The Canadian Organ Replacement Registry annual report, Treatment of End-Stage Organ Failure in Canada, 2000 to 2009, reveals that close to 38,000 Canadians were living with kidney failure in 2009—more than triple the number (11,000) living with the disease in 1990. The largest increase occurred in older age groups, with prevalence rates escalating by more than 500% for those age 75 and older. Patients in this age group account for 20% of all kidney failure cases.”

…continues on the site

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Chronic kidney disease hospitalisations in Australia 2000-01 to 2007-08 – AIHW – 18 August 2010

Posted on August 20, 2010. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Chronic kidney disease hospitalisations in Australia 2000-01 to 2007-08 – AIHW – 18 August 2010

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

“In 2007-08, chronic kidney disease (CKD) contributed to 15% (nearly 1.2 million) of all hospitalisations in Australia, one million of which were for regular dialysis. Indigenous Australians were hospitalised at 11 times the rate of other Australians for regular dialysis, and at 5 times the rate for other principal and additional CKD diagnoses. Hospitalisations for regular dialysis increased by an average of 60,000 per year between 2000-01 and 2007-08, equating to a 71% increase over this period. Increases of 12% for other principal diagnoses of CKD and 48% for additional diagnoses were also recorded.”

Authored by AIHW.

Published 18 August 2010; ISBN-13 978-1-74249-049-6; AIHW cat. no. PHE 127; 68pp

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A “Quiet Revolution” in Nephrology: Challenges and Opportunities for Advancing the Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease – RAND – 2010

Posted on August 12, 2010. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

A “Quiet Revolution” in Nephrology: Challenges and Opportunities for Advancing the Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease – RAND – 2010
 
By: Richard A. Rettig, Roberto B. Vargas, Keith C. Norris, Allen R. Nissenson
Pages: 4
Document Number: RB-9547-DREW

Shares results of a study examining changes in nephrology as it evolves from a focus on end-stage renal disease to the treatment of all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Earlier stages of CKD progression can be slowed, halted, or even reversed.

Full Document (pdf  File size 0.1 MB, < 1 minute modem, < 1 minute broadband)

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Chronic Kidney Disease — A Quiet Revolution in Nephrology – Six Case Studies – RAND – July 2010

Posted on July 26, 2010. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Chronic Kidney Disease — A Quiet Revolution in Nephrology – Six Case Studies – RAND – July 2010
 By: Richard A. Rettig, Roberto B. Vargas, Keith C. Norris, Allen R. Nissenson

“Examines changes in nephrology as it evolves from a focus on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) to the treatment of earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Once patients reach ESRD, treatments are limited to kidney transplantation and dialysis. However, the progression of earlier stages of CKD can be slowed, halted, or reversed when treated. Data from 15 clinics focusing on CKD are examined, with the focus on six case studies. Clinics are still establishing best-practice models, and reimbursement remains a challenge. Recommendations also include widespread education for primary care physicians on how to interpret levels of kidney function and on referral of patients with decreased kidney function to nephrologists before ESRD is reached.”

Pages: 94
ISBN/EAN: 9780833049728

Free, downloadable PDF file(s) are available below.
 
Full Document
(File size 0.5 MB, 2 minutes modem, < 1 minute broadband)
 
Summary Only
(File size 0.1 MB, < 1 minute modem, < 1 minute broadband)

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Imaging for acute kidney injury (acute renal failure): good practice recommendations from the National Imaging Board [UK] – 4 February 2010

Posted on February 9, 2010. Filed under: Nephrology, Radiology |

Imaging for acute kidney injury (acute renal failure): good practice recommendations from the National Imaging Board [UK] – 4 February 2010

Document type:   Publication
Author:   National Imaging Board

“The National Imaging Programme is led by Dr Erika Denton, National Clinical Lead for Diagnostic Imaging and chair of the National Imaging Board. The Imaging Programmes focus has been on reducing waiting times for imaging services in line with the 18 weeks target. The focus is now on sustaining these low waits; along with addressing wider diagnostic imaging issues to improve the quality of services, and enhance the patient experience.

The National Imaging Board was tasked to undertake this piece of work by Donal O’Donoghue, National Director for Kidney Care at DH, because of a consequence of the increased recognition of kidney disease following the publication of Part 2 of the Renal NSF and the inclusion of a CKD domain into the Quality Outcomes Framework and published NICE guidance on Chronic Kidney Disease has meant that there has been an increase in referrals into secondary care, and an increased uptake of diagnostics including renal ultrasound scanning.

These good practice recommendations support the implementation of existing guidelines as well as considering the possibility of “standardisation” of reporting to support optimal management of patients at the most appropriate part of the pathway. This document had also been reviewed by the Renal Association – Clinical Affairs Board, who support and endorse these best practice recommendations.”

* Download Imaging for Acute Kidney Injury (PDF, 41K)

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Kidney dialysis: developing costs to deliver an equitable and high quality service; final report – UK – Published 18 January 2010

Posted on January 20, 2010. Filed under: Health Economics, Nephrology |

Kidney dialysis: developing costs to deliver an equitable and high quality service; final report – UK – Published 18 January 2010

The working group looking at Payment by Results for renal dialysis has produced a report of its work. It will feed into work being taken forward to develop a best practice tariff for kidney dialysis services.

Department of Health – publications

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Achieving Excellence in Kidney Care: Delivering the National Service Framework for Renal Services – UK – 14 December 2009

Posted on December 29, 2009. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

Achieving Excellence in Kidney Care: Delivering the National Service Framework for Renal Services – UK – 14 December 2009

The National Service Framework for Renal Services set out the first ever set of national standards for the treatment of renal disease. This report highlights progress over the five years since the publication of the National Service Framework.

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Prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: targeting risk factors – AIHW – 11 December 2009

Posted on December 11, 2009. Filed under: Cardiol / Cardiothor Surg, Chronic Disease Mgmt, Diabetes, Nephrology, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

Prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: targeting risk factors

Authored by AIHW – Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

“Cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) account for around a quarter of the burden of disease in Australia, and just under two-thirds of all deaths. These three diseases often occur together and share risk factors, such as physical inactivity, overweight and obesity, and high blood pressure. This report includes information on the national prevalence of the main risk factors for CVD, CKD and diabetes as well as population initiatives and individual services that aim to prevent or control these risk factors. It shows the prevalence of some risk factors is increasing-notably obesity, which rose from 11% of adults in 1995 to 24% in 2007-08. This is the first report to present a systematic approach to monitor prevention in Australia, providing a baseline for future monitoring.”

Published 11 December 2009; ISBN-13 978 1 74024 984 3; AIHW cat. no. PHE 118; 140pp. 

Australian Government Reaction – Funding Supports Local Communities to Take Action on Obesity  –  11 December 2009

“Local government areas will receive a funding boost from the Rudd Government to foster healthier lifestyles in their communities, as the release of a sobering report shows risk factors of chronic disease continue to rise.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report, Prevention of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease: targeting risk factors, says the prevalence of some risk factors – such as obesity is increasing.” … continues on the website

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UK – National Renal Dataset – Improving Kidney Care through Information – 5 August 2009

Posted on August 6, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics, Nephrology | Tags: |

05-08-2009 – National Renal Dataset:  Improving Kidney Care through Information

“The National Renal Dataset provides the specification of information to be collected by the NHS to support implementation of the National Service Framework for Renal Services. This information will be used by kidney care services to assess their achievement of the quality standards and to improve kidney care for patients. Implementation of the dataset will take place in two stages: collection of 693 data items for May 2009 and a further 188 data items from April 2011.”

National Renal Dataset website

National Renal Dataset v2.0 (Excel, 756KB)

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Outline of the national centre for monitoring chronic kidney disease – AIHW

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Nephrology | Tags: |

In late 2007 the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare established the National Centre for Monitoring Chronic Kidney Disease. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common chronic disease in Australia. The disease is highly preventable and progression can be slowed by controlling common risk factors and by improving disease treatment and management. The burden of CKD in Australia is expected to rise. Work in this area is critical for improving capacity to assess the health impact of CKD, evaluate progress in disease prevention and management, and therefore provide evidence for developing policy to reduce the associated burden and outcomes for people at risk of or living with CKD. There is considerable potential for health, social and economic gains through CKD monitoring. This report is intended to be a brief outline of the rationale for and role of the National Centre for Monitoring Chronic Kidney Disease. It outlines the rationale behind starting a national monitoring centre, the structure of the centre, key areas of monitoring and major data sources to be used for monitoring.

Authored by AIHW.

Published 27 January 2009

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