Multidisciplinary Care

Multi-disciplinary teams in public health – UK’s Faculty of Public Health – 13 January 2014

Posted on January 16, 2014. Filed under: Multidisciplinary Care, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion |

Multi-disciplinary teams in public health – UK’s Faculty of Public Health – 13 January 2014

“Public Health England, the Faculty of Public Health (FPH), the Association of Directors of Public Health and the Local Government Association will work together to develop good practice guidance on the skill mix which councils may want to consider in a local public health team.”

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Shaping the choreography of care and support for older people in Glasgow – Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS) – July 2012

Posted on July 19, 2012. Filed under: Aged Care / Geriatrics, Multidisciplinary Care | Tags: |

Shaping the choreography of care and support for older people in Glasgow – Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services (IRISS) – July 2012

Media release

“Report of the Shaping the Choreography of Care and Support project

The government’s Reshaping Care for Older People (RCOP) agenda highlights the need to change the way we plan and deliver care and support. Not only does it mean improving a whole range of services, but also designing better ways of communicating across different agencies to support these improvements.

Over the course of 2011/12, IRISS, in partnership with The Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow City Council Social Work Services, Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS, Cornerstone Care and BUPA, was involved in a project to foster innovative strategies and actions for the development of future support for older people’s well-being.

It involved multidisciplinary teams (comprising designers, social service practitioners and users). The objective was to match the future expectations and aspirations of living a good older life to the resources that will be available to deliver it.

The final report of this project is now available for download.

Throughout the project, regular updates were posted to the project blog, which may also be of interest.”

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Better Care: An Analysis of Nursing and Healthcare System Outcomes – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Posted on June 27, 2012. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Multidisciplinary Care | Tags: , , |

Better Care: An Analysis of Nursing and Healthcare System Outcomes – Canadian Health Services Research Foundation – 18 June 2012

Gina Browne, et al

“Key messages

Problems arise when circumstances in the world change and conventional wisdom does not.

The present federally funded Canadian healthcare system has been driven principally by insured physicians and hospitals providing acute and episodic care that is a poor match to the changing  demographics of persons with chronic disease living longer. The current health system consumes nearly one-half of provincial budgets.

There are solutions.

Recent analysis of 2005 expenditures by member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development on health and social services has empirically demonstrated that, after adjusting for overall gross domestic product per capita, it is the ratio of social service expenditures to health service expenditures that is better associated with improved outcomes in key health indicators and not the amount spent on health services.

Models of proactive, targeted nurse led care that focus on preventive patient self-management for people with chronic disease are either more effective and equally or less costly, or are equally effective and less costly than the usual model of care.

Additional key components of more effective and efficient healthcare models involve community based, nurse led models of care with an interdisciplinary team that includes the primary care physician. Such complex intervention requires specially trained or advanced practice nurses who supplement the care provided by physicians and other healthcare professionals. The proactive, comprehensive, coordinated model of community care is patient and family centered, targeted at community-dwelling individuals with complex chronic conditions and social circumstances.

Telemonitoring offers added effectiveness and efficiencies to healthcare, especially for remote populations.

The monitoring, evaluation and performance measurement system for the provision of healthcare should build on and link to pan-Canadian efforts already under way, such as the Longitudinal Health and Administrative Data Initiative.

Nurse-led models of care can be financed by costs averted from hospitals and emergency departments to home or community care. For example, after managing the current hospital caseload of patients awaiting alternative levels of care, the number of hospital beds could be reduced to free up funds for this reallocation of funding.

In Ontario alone, representing 37% of the Canadian population, independent reports estimate that millions of dollars could be saved in direct healthcare costs within one year by:

having nurses provide leading practices in home wound care
integrating nurse-led models of care to reduce high hospital readmissions by 10% for those with chronic conditions
providing 25% of palliative care in the home as opposed to in acute hospital settings
providing community care for patients in hospital designated as needing an alternative
providing proactive community care and patient self-management for those with congestive heart failure and other chronic conditions

Getting from problems to solutions is possible.”

… continues on the site

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Training in interprofessional collaboration. Pedagogic innovation in family medicine units – Canadian Family Physician – April 2012

Posted on April 24, 2012. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Multidisciplinary Care, Primary Hlth Care | Tags: |

Training in interprofessional collaboration. Pedagogic innovation in family medicine units – Canadian Family Physician – April 2012

“Abstract

Problem addressed
A number of agencies that accredit university health sciences programs recently added standards for the acquisition of knowledge and skills with respect to interprofessional collaboration. Within primary care settings there are no practical training programs that allow students from different disciplines to develop competencies in this area.

Objective of the program
The training program was developed within family medicine units affi liated with Université Laval in Quebec for family medicine residents and trainees from various disciplines to develop competencies in patient-centred, interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care.

Program description
Based on adult learning theories, the program was divided into 3 phases—preparing family medicine unit  professionals, training preceptors, and training the residents and trainees. The program’s pedagogic strategies allowed participants to learn with, from, and about one another while preparing them to engage in contemporary primary care practices. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to evaluate the implementation process and the immediate results of the training  program.

Conclusion
The training program had a positive effect on both the clinical settings and the students. Preparation of clinical settings is
an important issue that must be considered when planning practical interprofessional training.”

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Improving safety in maternity services. A toolkit for teams – King’s Fund – 29 March 2012

Posted on March 30, 2012. Filed under: Multidisciplinary Care, Nursing, Obstetrics, Patient Safety | Tags: |

Improving safety in maternity services. A toolkit for teams – King’s Fund – 29 March 2012

“Summary

The safety of maternity services is of paramount importance. Maternity teams face many challenges in delivering safe care to mothers, babies and families. The King’s Fund launched an independent inquiry into the safety of maternity services in 2006. The report from that inquiry, Safe Births: Everybody’s business, made a series of recommendations about how the safety of maternity care could be improved.

Building on the recommendations from our inquiry and in partnership with the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, the Royal College of Midwives, the NHS Litigation Authority, Centre for Maternal And Child Enquiries and the National Patient Safety Agency, The King’s Fund launched the Safer Births Improvement Programme, providing customised support to 12 multidisciplinary maternity teams in England. This toolkit shares the experiences and lessons from those teams.

Improving Safety in Maternity Services: a toolkit for teams is organised around five key areas for improvement in maternity care on which the teams focused:

teamworking
communication
training
information and guidance
staffing and leadership.”

… continues on the site

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Interdisciplinary Teams. Making research make a difference – Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions – 2011

Posted on January 17, 2012. Filed under: Multidisciplinary Care, Research |

Interdisciplinary Teams. Making research make a difference – Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions – 2011

KT casebook Volume 2 2011

“This Casebook, the second in a series produced by Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, showcases knowledge translation activities of the Interdisciplinary Team Grant program. The program was launched in 2008 to support research addressing complex health problems. Co-funded by Alberta Health and Wellness and Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions, the program provides $50 million over fi ve years for 10 teams. The teams are interdisciplinary and multi institutional and include nearly 600 researchers and 160 trainees, and support 147 international collaborations. Research activities of the teams cover the spectrum of basic biomedical, clinical, health services, and population health research and all encompass an integrated KT approach.

The teams have already made notable gains on all measures of knowledge translation”

… continues

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Multidisciplinary Pain Programs for Chronic Noncancer Pain – AHRQ – 30 September 2011

Posted on November 11, 2011. Filed under: Chronic Disease Mgmt, Health Professions, Multidisciplinary Care | Tags: |

Multidisciplinary Pain Programs for Chronic Noncancer Pain – AHRQ – 30 September 2011

AHRQ = US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Jeffery MM, Butler M, Stark A, Kane RL. Multidisciplinary Pain Programs for Chronic Noncancer Pain. Technical Brief No. 8. (Prepared by Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center under Contract No. 290-07-10064-I.) AHRQ Publication No. 11-EHC064-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. September 2011.

“Abstract

Background. Chronic noncancer pain affects millions of Americans, seriously impacting their quality of life and costing billions of dollars every year in health care expenditures and lost productivity. There are currently no definitive cures for the most prevalent chronic pain syndromes. Multidisciplinary Pain Programs (MPPs) follow a model of care that emphasizes, when pain cannot be successfully eliminated, managing the pain to the extent that the patient’s independence is restored and overall quality of life improved.

Purpose. The purpose of this report is to describe the literature and identify important issues and gaps in the evidence base assessing MPPs for the treatment of chronic noncancer pain.

Methods. A review of the published literature and interviews with key informants were conducted

Findings. MPPs have been extensively documented in the standard medical literature. The 183 papers considered in this Technical Brief followed a biopsychosocial model of chronic pain, including treatment components in each of four areas: medical, behavioral, physical reconditioning, and education. Most of the studies were observational before-after designs. Although several different clinical conditions were studied, 90 percent of the studies included chronic back pain, the most frequent condition addressed in the literature. Differences were apparent between studies based in the United States and those in Europe; recent European studies were more likely than U.S. studies to include inpatient delivery of MPP treatment. Declining access to MPP treatment in the United States is highlighted as a key issue faced by those in the community of chronic pain sufferers and researchers.”

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Teams in Action: Primary Health Care Teams for Canadians April 2009 Health Council of Canada

Posted on May 1, 2009. Filed under: Multidisciplinary Care, Primary Hlth Care | Tags: , , |

Teams in Action: Primary Health Care Teams for Canadians  April 2009 Report from the Health Council of Canada

Health Council of Canada. (2009). Teams in Action: Primary Health Care Teams for Canadians. Toronto: Health Council.
ISBN: 978-1-897463-56-7

As Canada’s health care system deals with an aging population, collaborative health care teams are an effective way to treat the increasing number of Canadians with chronic health conditions.  Collaborative team care is a significant shift in the way Canadians are receiving their primary health care. Many Canadians may not know that this type of health care service is available to them, but they should – both as taxpayers and people who use health care services.

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Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Multidisciplinary Care, Workforce | Tags: |

Developed as part of the initiative, Transforming Care at the Bedside, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement

The Healthcare Team Vitality Instrument (HTVI) measures team vitality with an emphasis on dimensions related to front-line staff empowerment and engagement, perception of a work environment supportive of safe and high quality patient care, effective communication, and team collaboration. The HTVI was initially developed to assess team vitality of nurses and other personnel working on inpatient medical-surgical units. The tool has been adapted based upon validation research.

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Common Assessment Framework for Adults: A consultation on proposals to improve information sharing around multi-disciplinary assessment and care planning

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics, Health Systems Improvement, Multidisciplinary Care |

The [UK] Department of Health has launched a consultation on improving the quality and efficiency of care and support through improvements in the sharing and use of information. The consultation focuses on care and support for adults and on assisting the continued development of personalisation by helping people to choose services better suited to their needs. The document covers the rationale for improving information, how assessment and care planning should be undertaken, what information should be commonly shared and with whom and the IT approaches that would enable this to take place within appropriate arrangements for consent, confidentiality and security. The closing date for comments is 17 April 2009.

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