Knowledge Translation

Knowledge strategy: Harnessing the power of information to improve the public’s health – Public Health England – 17 June 2014

Posted on June 18, 2014. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Knowledge strategy: Harnessing the power of information to improve the public’s health – Public Health England – 17 June 2014

“This document describes the strategic approach to information and knowledge that the public health system needs to take in order to improve and protect public health and reduce inequalities. The knowledge strategy was developed following an extended and open consultation process and incorporates responses from local government, national organisations and key partners.”

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Sir Humphrey and the professors: What does Whitehall want from academics? – University of Manchester – April 2014

Posted on June 3, 2014. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Policy, Knowledge Translation |

Sir Humphrey and the professors: What does Whitehall want from academics? – University of Manchester – April 2014

A survey of senior civil servants’ views on the accessibility and utility of academic research and expertise

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Which doctors take up promising ideas? New insights from open data – Nesta – 28 January 2014

Posted on March 4, 2014. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, General Practice, Knowledge Translation, Primary Hlth Care | Tags: , |

Which doctors take up promising ideas? New insights from open data – Nesta – 28 January 2014

“The report looks at early adoption of promising new ideas across primary care in England and argues that analysing open data can help public services gain a greater understanding of their take up of innovations.

Key findings
No single group of GP practices were serial early adopters of all the innovations reviewed, but groups of early adopters were identified around specific types of innovations.
Larger GP practices are in a better position to explore and introduce new innovations, while neighbouring practices tended to have similar rates and patterns of adopting new innovations.
GPs rely on a range of resources to identify and learn about innovations – including informal local networks, personal relationships, and information systems. Fellow GPs and national guidance were particularly influential sources of information.
Local intermediaries – such as Academic Health Science Networks and Clinical Commissioning Groups – have an important role to play in the adoption process.

This report demonstrates a rising opportunity to inform practitioners and patients by making use of open data. Analysis of primary care open data shows the potential to chart GP surgeries’ uptake of promising innovations in technologies, drugs and practices.”

… continues

 

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Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence – analysing the importance of the National Lung Cancer Audit – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

Posted on February 4, 2014. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Oncology |

Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence – analysing the importance of the National Lung Cancer Audit – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

“A unique 20 year project to tackle the UK’s biggest cancer killer has become a “world leader in cancer intelligence”, according to a new report.

The National Lung Cancer Audit was launched in 1994 and captures up to date information on almost every lung cancer case in the UK.

It compares clinical practice at hospitals across the country, helping to identify problem areas and drive up standards of care for the disease, which kills 35,000 people every year.

The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation has produced a report – Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence – analysing the importance of the National Lung Cancer Audit

Authors of the audit have credited it with:

increasing the number of patients who receive radiotherapy from 25% in 2008 to 30% in 2012

increasing the number of patients who have surgery from 10% in 2008 to 15% in 2012

increasing the number of patients who have chemotherapy from 27% in 2008 to 32% in 2012

increasing the number of patients who see a nurse specialist from 50% in 2008 to 80% in 2012”

… continues on the site

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Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence: why the National Lung Cancer Audit is the key to transforming lung cancer outcomes – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

Posted on January 30, 2014. Filed under: Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation, Oncology |

Leading the information revolution in cancer intelligence: why the National Lung Cancer Audit is the key to transforming lung cancer outcomes – Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation – January 2014

Report

 

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Guide to monitoring and evaluating knowledge managment in global health programs – Center for Communication Programs, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health – 2013

Posted on January 30, 2014. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Guide to monitoring and evaluating knowledge managment in global health programs – Center for Communication Programs, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health – 2013

ISBN 978-0-9894734-9-1

This newly-updated Guide offers comprehensive guidance including a unique logic model and 42 common indicators to measure the process, reach, usefulness, and learning/action outcomes of knowledge management (KM) activities in the context of global health and development programs. It is the successor to the 2007 Guide to Monitoring Health Information Products and Services.”

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Matching form to function: Designing organizational models to support knowledge brokering in European health systems – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

Posted on January 23, 2014. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Libnship, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Matching form to function: Designing organizational models to support knowledge brokering in European health systems – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

John N. Lavis, Nasreen Jessani, Govin Permanand, Cristina Catallo, Amy Zierler, BriDGE Study Team

Extract from the key messages

“Credible, competent knowledge brokers in European health systems will ideally organize themselves so as to: inform policy-making using the best available health systems information; inform the production, packaging and sharing of health systems information based on current and emerging policy-making priorities; and employ (and continuously improve) information-packaging and interactive knowledge-sharing mechanisms that are based on a solid understanding of the policy-making context.
The BriDGE criteria can be used to assess an existing or planned organizational model.”

… continues

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How can knowledge brokering be advanced in a country’s health system? – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

Posted on January 16, 2014. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Libnship, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

How can knowledge brokering be advanced in a country’s health system? – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

Authors
John N. Lavis, McMaster University, Canada and Harvard School of Public Health, USA
Govin Permanand, Evidence and Information for Policy, WHO Regional Office for Europe, Denmark
Cristina Catallo, School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Canada and McMaster University, Canada
BRIDGE Study Team, which includes Josep Figueras, Mark Leys, David McDaid, Gabriele Pastorino and John-Arne Røttingen

“What’s the problem?
• The overarching problem is that there is a lack of attention given to ‘what to do next’ to advance knowledge brokering in many European countries’
health systems. This problem can be understood by considering four sets of interrelated issues within any given country’s health system:
– untapped potential for health systems information to inform policy-making;
– missed opportunities to take stock of the current state of knowledge brokering and to prioritize enhancements to information-packaging mechanisms, enrichments to interactive knowledge-sharing mechanisms, and adaptations to organizational models that support knowledge brokering;
– lack of alignment of support for knowledge brokering, including incentives and requirements for using promising knowledge-brokering mechanisms and models; and
– limited reach of existing efforts to advance knowledge brokering.”

… continues

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Public engagement and knowledge translation: environmental scan – Collaborative Health Innovation Network (CHIN) Alberta – November 2012

Posted on November 20, 2012. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Patient Participation |

Public engagement and knowledge translation: environmental scan – Collaborative Health Innovation Network (CHIN) Alberta – November 2012

Background

“The Collaborative Health Innovation Network (CHIN) was established in 2009 as a forum through which Alberta organizations can cooperate to improve the link between evidence and decision-making, and to increase the speed and impact of Alberta’s research investment through effective knowledge translation (KT). To explore how CHIN members could best work together, a working group convened to investigate an area of common interest – public engagement.

The investigation was built upon recent key documents and focused specifically on public engagement as it relates to the use of effective knowledge translation strategies in bringing evidence to all impacted decision-makers, regardless of the specific decisions to be made. Up for discussion was whether public engagement (PE) is, in and of itself, a KT strategy, or whether PE is a specific element of KT strategy.

An environmental scan was commissioned to:
(a) determine best frameworks and best practices related to the topic of public engagement
(b) understand the current Alberta landscape regarding knowledge translation in public engagement

… continues on the site

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Questions of life and death. An investigation into the value of health library and information services in Australia – October 2012

Posted on November 13, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Questions of life and death. An investigation into the value of health library and information services in Australia – October 2012

An initiative of Health Libraries Inc, supported by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA)

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European Science Foundation – recent publications

Posted on October 26, 2012. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Knowledge Translation, Research | Tags: |

Europeran Science Foundation recent publications on research and knowledge translation

Pan-European Clinical Trials (ECT) – Final Report – 20 October 2012
or  http://bit.ly/RZiYAD

Open Access in Biomedical Research – 19 October 2012
or  http://bit.ly/SC68Jq

Medical Research Education in Europe – 29 September 2012
or  http://bitly.com/SC63ph

Implementation of Medical Research in Clinical Practice – 28 September 2012
or  http://bit.ly/VscHP1

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Open access in biomedical research: science policy briefing – European Science Foundation – September 2012, released 22 October 2012

Posted on October 24, 2012. Filed under: Knowledge Translation | Tags: , , |

Open access in biomedical research: science policy briefing – European Science Foundation – September 2012, released 22 October 2012

Contents
2 • Foreword
3 • Executive summary
3 • Introduction
6 • Open access: where are we today in biomedical research?
12 • The international landscape of open access in biomedical research
13 • The European landscape of open access in biomedical research
16 • Diverging opinions on how best to achieve open access in biomedical research
19 • Recommendations
20 • Conclusions
21 • Useful websites and abbreviations
22 • List of contributors

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Developing a framework for establishing clinical decision support meaningful use objectives for clinical specialties – RAND – 2012

Posted on October 23, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation | Tags: , |

Developing a framework for establishing clinical decision support meaningful use objectives for clinical specialties – RAND – 2012

Extract from the preface

“The federal electronic health record (EHR) incentive program includes clinical decision support (CDS) as a central requirement of improving health outcomes; however, a process for identifying and prioritizing the most-promising targets for CDS has not been established. CDS provides those involved in care processes with general and person-specific information, intelligently filtered and organized, at appropriate times, to enhance health and health care.

This report describes a protocol for eliciting high-priority targets for electronic CDS for individual clinical specialties, which could serve to inform policymakers’ deliberations and establishment of CDS meaningful use objectives. Researchers from the RAND Corporation tested the protocol with four clinical specialties: oncology, orthopedic surgery, interventional cardiology, and pediatrics. A CDS target was defined as a clinical performance gap having one or more CDS opportunities that can be implemented to address the gap.  A CDS opportunity is defined as a specific CDS intervention that could be expected to address a clinical performance gap. CDS opportunities include existing CDS tools or interventions that might be developed in the short term.”

… continues on the site

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Dissemination and Adoption of Comparative Effectiveness Research Findings When Findings Challenge Current Practices – RAND – 2011

Posted on October 23, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation, Research | Tags: , |

Dissemination and Adoption of Comparative Effectiveness Research Findings When Findings Challenge Current Practices – RAND – 2011

by Eric C. Schneider, Justin W. Timbie, D. Steven Fox, Kristin R. Van Busum, John Caloyeras

“Insufficient evidence regarding the effectiveness of medical treatments has been identified as a key source of inefficiency in the U.S. healthcare system. Variation in the use of diagnostic tests and treatments for patients with similar symptoms or conditions has been attributed to clinical uncertainty, since the published scientific evidence base does not provide adequate information to determine which treatments are most effective for patients with specific clinical needs. The federal government has made a dramatic investment in comparative effectiveness research (CER), with the expectation that CER will influence clinical practice and improve the efficiency of healthcare delivery. To do this, CER must provide information that supports fundamental changes in healthcare delivery and informs the choice of diagnostic and treatment strategies. This report summarizes findings from a qualitative analysis of the factors that impede the translation of CER into clinical practice and those that facilitate it. A case-study methodology is used to explore the extent to which these factors led to changes in clinical practice following five recent key CER studies. The enabling factors and barriers to translation for each study are discussed, the root causes for the failure of translation common to the studies are synthesized, and policy options that may optimize the impact of future CER — particularly CER funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 -are proposed.”

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Studying policy implementation using a macro, meso and micro frame analysis: the case of the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research & Care (CLAHRC) programme nationally and in North West London

Posted on October 23, 2012. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Leadership, Research |

Studying policy implementation using a macro, meso and micro frame analysis: the case of the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research & Care (CLAHRC) programme nationally and in North West London
Sarah EM Caldwell and Nicholas Mays
Health Research Policy and Systems 2012, 10:32 doi:10.1186/1478-4505-10-32
Published: 15 October 2012

Abstract (provisional)

Background
The publication of Best research for best health in 2006 and the “ring-fencing” of health research funding in England marked the start of a period of change for health research governance and the structure of research funding in England. One response to bridging the ‘second translational gap’ between research knowledge and clinical practice was the establishment of nine Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRCs). The goal of this paper is to assess how national-level understanding of the aims and objectives of the CLAHRCs translated into local implementation and practice in North West London.

… continues on the site

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Implementing evidence-based programmes in children’s services: key issues for success – Department for Education [UK] – September 2012

Posted on October 23, 2012. Filed under: Child Health / Paediatrics, Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Implementing evidence-based programmes in children’s services: key issues for success – Department for Education [UK] – September 2012

“Evidence suggests that a carefully planned and well-resourced implementation is key to better outcomes and programme success. Across disciplines, implementation researchers have devised a number of frameworks that can be used to encourage the best practice in implementation and greatest fidelity to the original programme.

This report brings together the latest international thinking about the key issues relating to the implementation of evidence-based programmes, utilising both published work and expert opinion. The aim is to provide a summary of issues that should be considered and planned for by those about to start implementing a new programme in order to increase the chances of success; to draw attention to sources of further information; and to share lessons that have been learned by others when implementing similar programmes.

The research consisted of a literature review undertaken initially using snowballing techniques following the identification of key experts in the field. This was followed by a systematic search of electronic databases for previous reviews of implementation studies. For the second section of the report, electronic database searches were carried out for published academic papers relating to the MST, FFT, MTFC, and KEEP programmes.”

… continues on the site

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NIH creates Office of Emergency Care Research – 31 July 2012

Posted on August 2, 2012. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Knowledge Translation, Research | Tags: , |

NIH creates Office of Emergency Care Research – 31 July 2012

“Will coordinate and foster research and training in the emergency setting

To help improve health outcomes of patients who require emergency care, the National Institutes of Health has created a new Office of Emergency Care Research (OECR). The office is a focal point for basic, clinical and translational emergency care research and training across NIH.

“NIH has supported research to advance emergency care for years; however, now we have a single office to coordinate and foster our activities in this arena,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. “The NIH Office of Emergency Care Research will focus on speeding diagnosis and improving care for the full spectrum of conditions that require emergency treatment.”

Although OECR will not fund grants, it will foster innovation and improvement in emergency care and in the training of future researchers in this field by:”

… continues on the site

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Academic health science networks – Department of Health [UK] – 21 June 2012

Posted on June 22, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Academic health science networks – Department of Health [UK] – 21 June 2012

“The goal of AHSN’s will be to improve patient and population health outcomes by translating research into practice and developing and implementing integrated health care systems. The document sets out the draft designation and establishment process.

Every local NHS organisation should aspire to be affiliated to its local AHSN, which would act as a gateway for any NHS organisation needing support or help with innovation, and provide industry with focused points of access to the NHS.”

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Lessons from Health Innovation and Education Clusters – NHS Confederation – 19 June 2012

Posted on June 20, 2012. Filed under: Educ for Hlth Professions, Health Systems Improvement, Knowledge Translation | Tags: , |

Lessons from Health Innovation and Education Clusters – NHS Confederation – 19 June 2012

“The Health Innovation and Education Clusters (HIECs) initiative was launched in 2009/10 as an attempt to promote innovation in the NHS by combining the expertise of industry, health and education at a local level.

The initial funding for most of the 17 HIECs set up across England is due to finish this year, although most have secured continuing funds to manage the transition to new structures. Following research and interviews with all of the HIECs, this Briefing looks at their work to date, what impact it has made and what lessons can be learned from their experience of trying to spread innovation through partnerships.”

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Integrating research into practice: the CLAHRC experience – NHS Confederation – 19 June 2012

Posted on June 20, 2012. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Knowledge Translation, Research | Tags: , |

Integrating research into practice: the CLAHRC experience – NHS Confederation – 19 June 2012

“The NHS’s ability to harness innovation to improve patient outcomes is more important than ever in a tough financial climate. Uniquely among the organisations supporting this agenda, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaborations for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRCs) have integrated research and implementation to ensure findings improve practice in real time.

They carry out high-quality applied health research and support getting research evidence into practice in the NHS. It has been said that getting research into practice takes 17 years; CLAHRCs have shown that it’s possible within three years through collaborative partnership working. They provide a powerful model to connect innovation, evidence and implementation.

The NHS Confederation has been closely involved in the work of CLAHRCs and continues to host their national support function. This Briefing describes the CLAHRC approach and their impact to date as well as the factors that continue to contribute to their successes.”

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BC Knowledge Translation Needs Assessment: Initial Findings – May 2012

Posted on May 23, 2012. Filed under: Knowledge Translation |

BC Knowledge Translation Needs Assessment: Initial Findings – May 2012

“Background and objectives

As part of our commitment to supporting the use of health research evidence to improve practice and policy (knowledge translation, or KT), the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR) launched an online survey to find out about KT resource and training needs in British Columbia (BC), Canada.

The purpose of the survey was to better understand how to enhance our KT initiatives to support the use of health research evidence. The survey sought input on people’s current KT activities as well as what they would like to learn more about. The intended audience was people who produce health research evidence as well as those who use it in practice and policy.”

… continues

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Embedding of research into decision-making processes – WHO Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research – April 2012

Posted on May 23, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Policy, Knowledge Translation, Research | Tags: |

Embedding of research into decision-making processes – WHO Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research – April 2012

Adam D Koon, Devaki Nambiar, Krishna D Rao

Background paper commissioned by the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research to develop the WHO Health Systems  Research Strategy

“Objectives
This study is concerned with the uptake of research evidence in policy decisions for health and the factors which are conducive for this. Specifically, this study seeks to:

(a) Present a conceptual understanding of institutional embeddedness and apply it to the context of research in policy making in health. Further, through a review of the literature, document the institutional arrangements that facilitate the embedding of research use in the policy-making domain.

(b) Present country case studies to illustrate the embeddedness of research use in policy-making and the contextual and institutional factors that create enabling conditions for it.

We examine these questions from the perspective of the six WHO building blocks – service delivery, health workforce, information, medical products, financing and governance. Information is sourced from the existing literature and from country case studies.

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Enabling Health Care Decisionmaking Through Clinical Decision Support and Knowledge Management – AHRQ – April 2012

Posted on April 26, 2012. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation | Tags: , , |

Enabling Health Care Decisionmaking Through Clinical Decision Support and Knowledge Management – AHRQ – April 2012

Evidence Report / Technology Assessment no 2-3
AHRQ = Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US], Prepared by: Duke Evidence-based Practice Center, Durham, North Carolina

“Structured Abstract

Objectives: To catalogue study designs used to assess the clinical effectiveness of clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and knowledge management systems (KMSs), to identify features that impact the success of CDSSs/KMSs, to document the impact of CDSSs/KMSs on outcomes, and to identify knowledge types that can be integrated into CDSSs/KMSs.

Data Sources: MEDLINE®, CINAHL®, PsycINFO®, and Web of Science®.

Review Methods: We included studies published in English from January 1976 through December 2010. After screening titles and abstracts, full-text versions of articles were reviewed by two independent reviewers. Included articles were abstracted to evidence tables by two reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed for seven domains in which sufficient studies with common outcomes were included.

Results: We identified 15,176 articles, from which 323 articles describing 311 unique studies including 160 reports on 148 randomized control trials (RCTs) were selected for inclusion. RCTs comprised 47.5 percent of the comparative studies on CDSSs/KMSs. Both commercially and locally developed CDSSs effectively improved health care process measures related to performing preventive services (n = 25; OR 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27 to 1.58), ordering clinical studies (n = 20; OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.00), and prescribing therapies (n = 46; OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.82). Fourteen CDSS/KMS features were assessed for correlation with success of CDSSs/KMSs across all endpoints. Meta-analyses identified six new success features: integration with charting or order entry system, promotion of action rather than inaction, no need for additional clinician data entry, justification of decision support via research evidence, local user involvement, and provision of decision support results to patients as well as providers. Three previously identified success features were confirmed: automatic provision of decision support as part of clinician workflow, provision of decision support at time and location of decisionmaking, and provision of a recommendation, not just an assessment. Only 29 (19.6%) RCTs assessed the impact of CDSSs on clinical outcomes, 22 (14.9%) assessed costs, and 3 assessed KMSs on any outcomes. The primary source of knowledge used in CDSSs was derived from structured care protocols.

Conclusions: Strong evidence shows that CDSSs/KMSs are effective in improving health care process measures across diverse settings using both commercially and locally developed systems. Evidence for the effectiveness of CDSSs on clinical outcomes and costs and KMSs on any outcomes is minimal. Nine features of CDSSs/KMSs that correlate with a successful impact of clinical decision support have been newly identified or confirmed.”

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Identifying Trustworthy Experts: How Do Policymakers Find and Assess Public Health Researchers Worth Consulting or Collaborating With? – PLoS One – 5 March 2012

Posted on March 27, 2012. Filed under: Health Policy, Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion |

Identifying Trustworthy Experts: How Do Policymakers Find and Assess Public Health Researchers Worth Consulting or Collaborating With? – PLoS One – 5 March 2012

“Abstract

This paper reports data from semi-structured interviews on how 26 Australian civil servants, ministers and ministerial advisors find and evaluate researchers with whom they wish to consult or collaborate. Policymakers valued researchers who had credibility across the three attributes seen as contributing to trustworthiness: competence (an exemplary academic reputation complemented by pragmatism, understanding of government processes, and effective collaboration and communication skills); integrity (independence, “authenticity”, and faithful reporting of research); and benevolence (commitment to the policy reform agenda). The emphases given to these assessment criteria appeared to be shaped in part by policymakers’ roles and the type and phase of policy development in which they were engaged. Policymakers are encouraged to reassess their methods for engaging researchers and to maximise information flow and support in these relationships. Researchers who wish to influence policy are advised to develop relationships across the policy community, but also to engage in other complementary strategies for promoting research-informed policy, including the strategic use of mass media.”

Croakey commentary on the research

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Needles in a haystack: Seeking knowledge with clinical informatics – pwc – 2012

Posted on March 6, 2012. Filed under: Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Needles in a haystack: Seeking knowledge with clinical informatics – pwc – 2012
http://www.pwc.com/us/hitinformatics

“One constant in all of the new care and reimbursement models is data. With the digitization of healthcare, new opportunities are rising from a marked increase in the channels, volume, and complexity of information available. Organizations will compete on how effectively and affordably they manage patient care and identify patients who need preventive care. Healthcare organizations need strategies for mining data, conducting and integrating evidence-based research, and driving the behavior changes required for patient compliance.”

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The Use of Health Knowledge by Not-for-profit Organizations: Taking a Look at Their Policy-influencing Practices – [Canadian] National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy – January 2012

Posted on February 14, 2012. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

The Use of Health Knowledge by Not-for-profit Organizations: Taking a Look at Their Policy-influencing Practices – [Canadian] National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy – January 2012

“This document examines the way in which five not-for-profit (NFP) organizations use health knowledge in their efforts to influence public policy related to population health.

This document is part of a project exploring issues surrounding relationships between not-for-profit organizations (NFPs) and the public health sector. More specifically, it deals with the way in which NFPs use health knowledge in their practices and the issues that this raises for public health professionals conducting or planning to engage in knowledge exchange processes with these stakeholders..

The purpose of the analysis proposed here is to facilitate reflection by public health professionals on certain issues affecting current or future knowledge exchange activities with NFPs.”

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Making a difference. Stories from the field: how access to scientific literature is improving the livelihoods of communities around the world – research4life – January 2012

Posted on January 23, 2012. Filed under: Health Libnship, Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion, Research | Tags: |

Making a difference. Stories from the field: how access to scientific literature is improving the livelihoods of communities around the world – research4life – January 2012

“To celebrate Research4Life’s 10th anniversary in 2011, we launched a user experience competition. We asked users to share with us how HINARI, AGORA or OARE has improved their work, life and community. In total we received some 60 entries from countries in all five continents. This impressive array of inspiring testimonies revealed a wealth of positive impacts brought about by Research4Life. This book celebrates the stories behind some of these competition entries.

This illuminating series of case studies provides insights into how access to the results of peer-reviewed research from Research4Life publisher partners is benefiting the health, well-being, and economic and social development of communities in the developing world, as well as contributing to greater environmental health and awareness.”

… continues on the site

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NHS Chief Executive’s Review of Innovation in the NHS Summary of the responses to the Call for Evidence and Ideas – Young Foundation – December 2011

Posted on January 17, 2012. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Knowledge Translation | Tags: , |

NHS Chief Executive’s Review of Innovation in the NHS Summary of the responses to the Call for Evidence and Ideas – Young Foundation – December 2011

“In June 2011, the Department of Health issued a Call for Evidence and Ideas about how the adoption and diffusion of innovations can be accelerated across the NHS. This was part of the NHS Chief Executive‘s Review of Innovation in the NHS. This report is a summary of the responses submitted to the Call for Evidence which was carried out by the Young Foundation on behalf of the Department of Health.”

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Accelerating progress against cancer: ASCO’s blueprint for transforming clinical and translational cancer research – American Society of Clinical Oncology – November 2011

Posted on December 2, 2011. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Oncology, Research |

Accelerating progress against cancer: ASCO’s blueprint for transforming clinical and translational cancer research – American Society of Clinical Oncology – November 2011

“This report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology lays out a vision for an approach to clinical and translational cancer research that takes full advantage of today’s scientific and technological opportunities. If bold action is taken to achieve this vision, we can realize major new advances in cancer prevention,  detection and treatment and improve the care of patients.”

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Implementation research for the control of infectious diseases of poverty – WHO – 17 October 2011

Posted on October 20, 2011. Filed under: Infectious Diseases, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Implementation research for the control of infectious diseases of poverty – WHO – 17 October 2011

“Strengthening the evidence base for the access and delivery of new and improved tools, strategies and interventions

ISBN:  978 92 4 150262 7
 
Summary

This report shows how implementation research can increase access to health interventions in low and middle income countries. It explains how it can be used to strengthen health systems, improve patient safety, expand community-based interventions and local implementation capacity, and improve the outcomes of public-private partnerships and global health initiatives. The report provides numerous case studies and a “roadmap for action” on how to better use this research field. More than 120 people from across the globe came together for this project, with the goal of defining the value of implementation research and highlighting the gaps in this area. Researchers, implementers, scientists and representatives from product development partnerships (PDPs) attended an initial meeting organized in conjunction with the Ministry of Health of Uganda in Kampala, 28-30 June 2010. They provided critical input and analysis into a draft outline of the issues, which was then further developed by a team of authors from low, middle and high income countries, who provide a rich variety of perspectives and experiences.”

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Understanding Whole Systems Change in Healthcare: The Case of Emerging Evidence-informed Nursing Service Delivery Models – an Health Services Research Foundation – 7 October 2011

Posted on October 18, 2011. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation, Nursing | Tags: |

Understanding Whole Systems Change in Healthcare: The Case of Emerging Evidence-informed Nursing Service Delivery Models – an Health Services Research Foundation – 7 October 2011
Nancy Edwards, Doris Grinspun

“The imperative to deliver the best care possible drives research on best practices in nursing, but what does it take to spread a guideline or recommendation from one or two units or organizations to a system-wide innovation that benefits all patients and providers and the healthcare system as a whole? What cost drivers and increased benefits come with spreading a best practice; and what supports, sustains or gets in the way of spreading evidence-informed change?

Those were the questions we set out to answer in our four-year program of research called Evidence-Informed Models of Nursing Service. Funded by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation and other partners, the program’s goal was to improve understanding of how health systems introduce, support and spread evidence-informed innovations.

Researchers from across Canada participated in the five projects that made up our program of research, and its main focus was the best practice guidelines initiative of the Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO). Eight years after the association launched the project, the guidelines are being implemented across Canada and internationally. However, for these the longest (except for study 2, which actually looks at three innovations introduced in Ontario before RNAO launched its guideline initiative). We looked at nursing guidelines because nurses are with patients around the clock, in every sector of healthcare, and getting nurses to base their work on up-to-date, evidence-based practices, is central to delivering safe care and optimizing patient, organizational and system outcomes. The learnings of this study about spreading innovations applies to all healthcare professions and sectors.”

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Innovations in Knowledge Translation: the SPHERU KT Casebook – Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit – June 2011

Posted on October 18, 2011. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Preventive Healthcare, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion |

Innovations in Knowledge Translation: the SPHERU KT Casebook – Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit – June 2011
Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU)

“In November of 2009, the Saskatchewan Population Health and Evaluation Research Unit (SPHERU) issued a call for abstracts on knowledge translation (KT). We invited researchers, academics, policy makers, community practitioners and others to submit examples highlighting their work with KT initiatives. We asked contributors to focus on one of the following three themes: KT Strategies; KT in Action: Leading to Change in Policy or Practice; and Evaluation of KT Effectiveness. Our goal for the Innovations in Knowledge Translation: the SPHERU KT Casebook was to provide a toolkit of different knowledge translation (KT) strategies, actions, and evaluations to highlight concrete examples and best practices in knowledge translation.

The Casebook represents a diverse collection of innovative knowledge translation stories ranging from developing a music video for sharing healing stories of Aboriginal women’s drug addiction, to a national symposium to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors among school-aged children in Trinidad and Tobago. The casebook provides a means for sharing knowledge translation (KT) strategies, actions, and evaluations to help guide academics, researchers, community practitioners, policy makers and others in their application of knowledge translation.”  … continues

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Integrating Clinical Decision Support Into Workflow—Final Report – AHRQ – September 2011

Posted on October 4, 2011. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation | Tags: , |

Integrating Clinical Decision Support Into Workflow—Final Report – AHRQ – September 2011

Doebbeling BN, Saleem J, Haggstrom D, et al. Integrating Clinical Decision Support Into Workflow—Final Report. (Prepared by Indiana University, Regenstrief Institute under Contract No. HSA290200600013-3.) AHRQ Publication No. 11-0076-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. September 2011.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality – AHRQ Publication No. 11-0076-EF

“Structured Abstract

Purpose: The aims were to (1) identify barriers and facilitators related to integration of clinical decision support (CDS) into workflow and (2) develop and test CDS design alternatives.

Scope: To better understand CDS integration, we studied its use in practice, focusing on CDS for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and followup. Phase 1 involved outpatient clinics of four different systems—120 clinic staff and providers and 118 patients were observed. In Phase 2, prototyped design enhancements to the Veterans Administration’s CRC screening reminder were compared against its current reminder in a simulation experiment. Twelve providers participated.

Methods: Phase 1 was a qualitative project, using key informant interviews, direct observation, opportunistic interviews, and focus groups. All data were analyzed using a coding template, based on the sociotechnical systems theory, which was modified as coding proceeded and themes emerged. Phase 2 consisted of rapid prototyping of CDS design alternatives based on Phase 1 findings and a simulation experiment to test these design changes in a within-subject comparison.

Results: Very different CDS types existed across sites, yet there are common barriers: (1) lack of coordination of “outside” results and between primary and specialty care; (2) suboptimal data organization and presentation; (3) needed provider and patient education; (4) needed interface flexibility; (5) needed technological enhancements; (6) unclear role assignments; (7) organizational issues; and (8) disconnect with quality reporting. Design enhancements positively
impacted usability and workflow integration but not workload.

Conclusions: Effective CDS design and integration requires: (1) organizational and workflow integration; (2) integrating outside results; (3) improving data organization and presentation in a flexible interface; and (4) providing just-in time education, cognitive support, and quality reporting.”

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Increasing the Utilization of Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care – Nursing Health Services Research Unit – 2011

Posted on June 28, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Knowledge Translation, Nursing | Tags: , |

Increasing the Utilization of Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care – Nursing Health Services Research Unit – 2011

Extract from the Executive Summary:

“This report presents evidence in published literature about successful outcomes/performance monitoring implementation strategies, as well as recommendations from healthcare managers to provide a process evaluation of the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care (MOHLTC) Health Outcomes for Better Information and Care (HOBIC) implemented between 2006 and 2010.The findings demonstrate implementation and sustainability strategies for healthcare initiatives that have been evaluated and published in academic literature, and interview feedback from healthcare managers in acute and long-term care settings in which HOBIC was implemented. The research design for this project included two key components: a literature review on successful outcomes/performance monitoring implementation strategies and interviews with HOBIC leadership in MOHLTC identified sites to discuss specific implementation and utilization strategies and recommendations for HOBIC going forward. Rogers’ Model of the Innovation-Decision Process (2003) was used as a theoretical model to link the implementation processes, specifically the five sequential stages of the process of innovation decision-making: knowledge, persuasion, decision, implementation, and confirmation. This theoretical model describes how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread through culture, and therefore has particular relevance to HOBIC utilization and uptake. A review of published literature focused on the terms: practice change, practice implementation, practice improvement, implementation strategy, successful implementation, nursing practice change, nursing intervention implementation and nursing implementation adoption. This revealed an initial 2,338 abstracts which were scanned, and 29 studies that were selected (Appendix A) and analysed for key themes, strategies, and sustainability efforts that proved successful. Expert consultation was sought through semi-structured phone interviews with HOBIC leaders from 12 acute care sites and four long-term care sites. Qualitative analysis of interview content focused on motivators and strategies for implementation, utilization and sustainability practices, and recommendations for practice-change going forward.”

… continues on the site

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Method for Synthesizing Knowledge About Public Policies – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy – September 2010

Posted on May 31, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Health Policy, Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

Method for Synthesizing Knowledge About Public Policies – National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy – September 2010

“The Centre proposes this method as a way to overcome the difficulties underlying the study of public policies.

Public policy can act as a lever for action that affects population health. Therefore, public health actors are called upon to produce knowledge syntheses in order to inform decision makers during the promotion, adoption and implementation of public policies. But studying these policies raises specific challenges.

Drawing inspiration from political science, literature on evidence-informed decision making in public health, literature on evaluation and on deliberative processes, the NCCHPP has developed a knowledge synthesis method that is applicable to public policies.

Using this method, one can document the effects and equity of the policies under study, as well as implementation issues of concern to decision makers (costs, feasibility, acceptability), based on the construction of logic models, on the scientific and grey literatures, and on deliberative processes organized to gather contextual information.”

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The Registry of Methods and Tools: knowledge translation methods and tools for public health – National [Canadian] Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools

Posted on May 31, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

The Registry of Methods and Tools: knowledge translation methods and tools for public healthNational [Canadian] Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools

“Find accessible, quality-appraised and searchable knowledge translation methods and tools

The Registry is a searchable, online collection of quality-assessed, evidence-informed methods (processes) and tools (instruments) for knowledge translation in public health. The Registry’s goals are to help public health practitioners:

communicate new knowledge to clients and colleagues;
support innovation uptake in their organization;
synthesize and appraise public health related research;
apply a new technique for working with community partners; and
summarize relevant evidence for public health policy decisions.

The Registry contains summary statements of knowledge translation methods and tools to help busy practitioners use evidence in their practice. The Registry identifies and describes effective resources for knowledge translation, making them easier for you to find and use.”

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Australia’s Knowledge Gateway

Posted on May 27, 2011. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Research |

Australia’s Knowledge Gateway

“World class research and innovative activities occur every day in Australia’s universities but it can be difficult for individuals and industry groups to identify and access specific expertise.

The Go8 presents the “Australia’s Knowledge Gateway” – a search engine to highlight the activities of Australian researchers and make them more accessible to business, government, Australia’s foreign affairs and trade officials, students and the wider community.

The search uses key words so you don’t need to be familiar with academic terms to make use of it. It identifies individuals and institutions with strength in particular research disciplines.

In promoting Australian research strengths, Australia’s Knowledge Gateway aims to facilitate new linkages with universities that will result in benefits to all Australians.”

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Academic – NHS – Industry Collaboration in Experimental Medicine – NHS Insttitute for Health Research – 2011

Posted on May 10, 2011. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Research | Tags: |

Academic – NHS – Industry Collaboration in Experimental Medicine – NHS Insttitute for Health Research – 2011

“The ability of academia, the NHS and industry to collaborate in more productive ways will speed translation of scientific ideas and observations into therapeutics and benefits for patients.

Collaboration is effective when it teams complementary scientific skills, knowledge and technologies to tackle a complex research issue. It is most pertinent when undertaking the early clinical phase in the development of a new healthcare product. At a recent workshop involving the directors of academic experimental medicine centres and industry scientists, a number of complementary strengths and resources were highlighted:”  … continues

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Report on knowledge transfer and exchange practices: A systematic review of the quality and types of instruments used to assess KTE implementation and impact – Institute for Work and Health [Canada] – April 2011

Posted on May 10, 2011. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Research |

Report on knowledge transfer and exchange practices: A systematic review of the quality and types of instruments used to assess KTE implementation and impact – Institute for Work and Health [Canada] – April 2011

“To help ensure that their research makes a difference, research organizations are committing more time and resources to knowledge transfer and exchange (KTE) — the practice of putting relevant research into the hands of key decision-makers and stakeholders in a timely, accessible and useful manner.

Yet, the effectiveness of current KTE practices has not been routinely or consistently evaluated. In part, this could be because of the lack of instruments for assessing the impact of KTE activities.

This systematic review sought to fill this gap. It looked across a wide variety of research fields to identify tools that can accurately and reliably measure how well KTE activities bring research evidence to practitioners and change their knowledge, attitudes and/or behaviour.

The review found that few well-developed instruments are currently available. However, some instruments do show promise as potentially useful tools in evaluating KTE practices.”

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Physician Practices, E-Prescribing and Accessing Information to Improve Prescribing Decisions – Center for Studying Health System Change Research Brief No 20 – May 2011

Posted on May 6, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation, Pharmacy | Tags: |

Physician Practices, E-Prescribing and Accessing Information to Improve Prescribing Decisions – Center for Studying Health System Change Research Brief No 20 – May 2011

By Joy M. Grossman, Ellyn R. Boukus, Dori A. Cross and Genna R. Cohen

Abstract:
“Hoping to reduce medication errors and contain health care costs, policy makers are promoting electronic prescribing through Medicare and Medicaid financial incentives. Many e-prescribing systems provide electronic access to important information—for example, medications prescribed by physicians in other practices, patient formularies and generic alternatives—when physicians are deciding what medications to prescribe. However, physician practices with e-prescribing face challenges using these features effectively, according to a new qualitative study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

While most of the 24 practices studied reported that physicians had access to patient formulary information, only slightly more than half reported physician access to patient medication histories, and many physicians did not routinely review these sources of information when making prescribing decisions. Study respondents highlighted two barriers to use: 1) tools to view and import the data into patient records were  cumbersome to use in some systems; and 2) the data were not always perceived as useful enough to warrant the additional time to access and review them, particularly during time-pressed patient visits. To support generic prescribing, practices typically set their system defaults to permit pharmacist substitution of generics; many practices also used other tools to more proactively identify and select generic alternatives at the point of prescribing. Overall, physicians who more strongly perceived the need for third-party data, those in practices with greater access to complete and accurate data, and those with easier-to-use e-prescribing systems were more likely to use these features consistently.”

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Using evidence: Advances and debates in bridging health research and action – Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre – 2010

Posted on May 4, 2011. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion |

Using evidence: Advances and debates in bridging health research and action – Atlantic Health Promotion Research Centre – 2010
Editor: Renée F. Lyons, 2010   ISBN 978-0-7703-8051-9

“About the Monograph
This monograph grew out of a symposium on health and knowledge translation (KT) held at 13 Norham Gardens, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford, in May 2008. The purpose of the symposium was to examine ways of thinking about and doing knowledge translation, and to debate issues central to moving research into action. Case examples were provided from health services and policy, clinical practice, and public health.”

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Knowledge for Improvement: Special Supplement – BMJ – April 2011

Posted on April 5, 2011. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation |

Knowledge for Improvement: Special Supplement – BMJ – April 2011

From the Institute for Healthcare Improvement

“In April 2010, some of the best thinkers and architects of the science of quality improvement in health care gathered in England to look deeply at the state of the knowledge underpinning the discipline. For several days, thanks to the sponsorship of the UK’s Health Foundation, IHI, and the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Improvement, meeting participants examined the strengths and limitations and new needs for an epistemology that’s now fueling a truly global movement for quality and safety. The work of this colloquium, organized by Dartmouth’s Paul Batalden and the Health Foundation’s Dale Webb and Paul Bate, is now the focus of some 22 essays just published by BMJ Quality & Safety (previously Quality and Safety in Health Care) in a special, OPEN ACCESS supplement entitled “Knowledge for Improvement.” Co-edited by Paul Batalden and IHI Senior Editor Frank Davidoff, the articles cover six major areas: the structure of improvement knowledge; discovering and defining sources of evidence; the social determinants of action; the importance of cross-disciplinary work; the challenges of professional education; and rethinking methods of inference. Let the reading, and learning, begin!”

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How should we assess knowledge translation in research organizations; designing a Knowledge Translation Self-Assessment Tool for Research Institutes (SATORI) – 2011

Posted on March 1, 2011. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Research |

How should we assess knowledge translation in research organizations; designing a Knowledge Translation Self-Assessment Tool for Research Institutes (SATORI)
Health Research Policy and Systems 2011, 9:10

“The knowledge translation self-assessment tool for research institutes (SATORI) was designed to assess the status of knowledge translation in research institutes. The objective was, to identify the weaknesses and strengths of knowledge translation in research centres and faculties associated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). The self-assessment tool identifies the gaps in capacity and infrastructure of knowledge translation support within research organizations.”

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Posted on September 28, 2010. Filed under: Health Policy, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Policy-Making as a Struggle for Meaning: Disentangling Knowledge Translation across International Health Contexts – June 2010

Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou, Eivor Oborn, Michael Barrett and Yolande Chan (authors)
School of Management, Royal Holloway University of London Working Paper Series  SoMWP–1005
ISBN: 978-1-905846-46-7

Abstract: Over the last decade, research in medical science has focused on knowledge translation and diffusion of best practices to enable improved health outcomes. However, there has been less attention given to the role of policy development in influencing the translation of best practice across different national contexts. This paper argues that the underlying set of public discourses and ideological presuppositions of healthcare policy significantly influence its development with implications for the dissemination of best practices. Our research examines the policy discourses surrounding the treatment of stroke across Canada and UK, and how they are constituted by different underlying meanings of innovative best practice, user participation, and service restructuring. These findings provide an important yet overlooked starting point for understanding the role of policy development in knowledge transfer and the translation of science into health practice.

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Options for Large-scale Spread of Simple, High-impact Interventions – September 2010

Posted on September 28, 2010. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety | Tags: , |

Options for Large-scale Spread of Simple, High-impact Interventions – September 2010

This report was prepared by the USAID Health Care Improvement Project (HCI), implemented by University Research Co., LLC (URC), for review by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and by request of the World Health Organization (WHO) Patient Safety Programme and the Harvard School of Public Health. It was authored by M. Rashad Massoud (URC), Katlyn L. Donohue (URC), and C. Joseph McCannon (Institute for Healthcare Improvement).

“This paper outlines what we know to be effective in the adoption and spread of high-impact interventions.”

Recommended citation: Massoud MR, Donohue KL, and McCannon CJ. 2010. Options for Large-scale Spread of Simple, high-impact Interventions. Technical Report. Published by the USAID Health Care Improvement Project. Bethesda, MD: University Research Co. LLC (URC).

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Healthy services research – The future of health services research in the Netherlands 2008

Posted on November 3, 2009. Filed under: Health Systems Improvement, Knowledge Translation, Research |

Advisory Council on Health Research. Healthy services research. The future of health services research in the Netherlands. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands, 2008; RGO no. 59E.

“Background

In response to questions from the Lower House of Parliament about the knowledge infrastructure for health sciences the Minister of Health, Welfare and Sport has identified the need for an analysis by the Advisory Council on Health
Research (RGO). The minister formulated two central questions: ‘… whether the knowledge infrastructure is of sufficient size and stability to properly address the questions regarding developments in the health care system now and in the future’ and ‘… whether there is a good balance between free risky innovative research and demand guided research’. For both questions he requested ‘… a good analysis and a convincing answer’ by the RGO.”

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NHS Evidence – review in HSJ – 18 Jun 2009

Posted on June 19, 2009. Filed under: Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

NHS Evidence – review in HSJ – 18 Jun 2009

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What can management theories offer evidence-based practice? – article 19 May 2009

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Systems Improvement, Knowledge Translation, Leadership |

Research article
What can management theories offer evidence-based practice? A comparative analysis of measurement tools for organisational context
Beverley French, Lois H. Thomas, Paula Baker, Chris R. Burton, Lindsay Pennington and Hazel Roddam
Implementation Science 2009, 4:28doi:10.1186/1748-5908-4-28 Published:     19 May 2009

“Abstract (provisional)

Background
Given the current emphasis on networks as vehicles for innovation and change in health service delivery, the ability to conceptualise and measure organisational enablers for the social construction of knowledge merits attention. This study aimed to develop a composite tool to measure the organisational context for evidence-based practice (EBP) in healthcare.
Methods
A structured search of the major healthcare and management databases for measurement tools from four domains: research utilisation (RU), research activity (RA), knowledge management (KM), and organisational learning (OL). Included studies were reports of the development or use of measurement tools that included organisational factors. Tools were appraised for face and content validity, plus development and testing methods. Measurement tool items were extracted, merged across the four domains, and categorised within a constructed framework describing the absorptive and receptive capacities of organisations.
Results
Thirty measurement tools were identified and appraised. Eighteen tools from the four domains were selected for item extraction and analysis. The constructed framework consists of seven categories relating to three core organisational attributes of vision, leadership, and a learning culture, and four stages of knowledge need, acquisition of new knowledge, knowledge sharing, and knowledge use. Measurement tools from RA or RU domains had more items relating to the categories of leadership, and acquisition of new knowledge; while tools from KM or learning organisation domains had more items relating to vision, learning culture, knowledge need, and knowledge sharing. There was equal emphasis on knowledge use in the different domains.
Conclusions
If the translation of evidence into knowledge is viewed as socially mediated, tools to measure the organisational context of EBP in healthcare could be enhanced by consideration of related concepts from the organisational and management sciences. Comparison of measurement tools across domains suggests that there is scope within EBP for supplementing the current emphasis on human and technical resources to support information uptake and use by individuals. Consideration of measurement tools from the fields of KM and OL shows more content related to social mechanisms to facilitate knowledge recognition, translation, and transfer between individuals and groups.”

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Knowledge Translation Learning Modules – Three knowledge translation learning modules are now freely available from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Posted on May 20, 2009. Filed under: Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Knowledge Translation Learning Modules – Three knowledge translation learning modules are now freely available from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research – May 2009

  • A Guide to Researcher and Knowledge-User Collaboration in Health Research
  • Introduction to Evidence-Informed Decision Making
  • Critical Appraisal of Intervention Studies
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Managing evidence-based knowledge: the need for reliable, relevant and readable resources – the 5S Model – article from CMAJ 2009

Posted on May 5, 2009. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Straus, Sharon, Haynes, R. Bryan
Managing evidence-based knowledge: the need for reliable, relevant and readable resources
CMAJ 2009 180: 942-945

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NHS Evidence has been launched

Posted on May 1, 2009. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation | Tags: , , |

Press release on the launch of NHS Evidence

from the website about    NHS Evidence:

“Background to NHS Evidence

The creation of NHS Evidence was announced on June 30th 2008 as part of the High Quality Care for All report from Lord Darzi, who stated that: “All NHS Staff will have access to a new NHS Evidence service where they will be able to get, through a single web-based portal, authoritative clinical and non-clinical evidence and best practices.”

The NHS Evidence service

The principle aim of the NHS Evidence service is to provide easy access to a comprehensive evidence base for everyone in health and social care who takes decisions about treatments or the use of resources – including clinicians, public health professionals, commissioners and service managers – thus improving health and patient care. It will build on NICE’s significant international reputation for developing high quality evidence-based guidance. It provides access to a range of information types, including primary research literature, practical implementation tools, guidelines and policy documents.

To achieve the aim stated above, NHS Evidence will:

* Provide comprehensive access to information in health and social care via a web-based portal
* Commission the development of evidence-based information from external agencies, in line with user needs and priorities
* Provide a central purchasing function to enable health professionals in the NHS to access journals and other relevant resources
* Provide a formal accreditation scheme for defined categories of information such as clinical guidelines
* Identify evidence reflecting best practice in particular topic areas to inform a range of user groups
* Engage with users and stakeholders to support the use of evidence in decision-making, and to provide feedback to develop the service”

…. continues on the website

NICE has had a website revamp as well

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Retaining institutional wisdom: Using an evidence-informed approach to transfer knowledge from experienced nurses to new nursing staff March 2009 report

Posted on April 29, 2009. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation, Nursing | Tags: |

Promising Practices
Retaining institutional wisdom: Using an evidence-informed approach to transfer knowledge from experienced nurses to new nursing staff

Number 21, March 2009

”    * The nursing service of a Quebec-based health and social services centre has developed an evidence-informed approach to capture knowledge – especially tacit knowledge – from experienced nurses, and transfer it to new nursing staff.
* A key element in the creation of organizational knowledge is the active participation of staff members who are directly involved in care delivery, combined with best practices.
* The project has increased the success rate of new nurse orientations and retention, and has reduced the reliance on supplemental nursing resources. This project, grounded in a philosophy of continuous quality improvement, has helped to reduce the occurrence of adverse events.

Many healthcare organizations are grappling with the consequences of high attrition rates. To address this, and as part of the process of becoming a learning organization, the Baie-des-Chaleurs Health and Social Services Centre in Quebec has developed an evidence-informed approach to capture the knowledge of experienced nurses and transfer it to new staff.”

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Retaining institutional wisdom: Using an evidence-informed approach to transfer knowledge from experienced nurses to new nursing staff March 2009

Posted on April 17, 2009. Filed under: Knowledge Translation, Nursing |

Retaining institutional wisdom: Using an evidence-informed approach to transfer knowledge from experienced nurses to new nursing staff March 2009

The nursing service of a Quebec-based health and social services centre has developed an evidence-informed approach to capture knowledge – especially tacit knowledge – from experienced nurses, and transfer it to new nursing staff.

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NHS Evidence: draft process manual

Posted on April 16, 2009. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Knowledge Translation | Tags: , |

NHS Evidence: draft process manual 20 March 2009

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Lost in Knowledge Transfer? Research Transfer Network of Alberta conference September 28 to 30, 2008, Banff, Alberta, Canada – Proceedings

Posted on April 16, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation |

Lost in Knowledge Transfer?  Research Transfer Network of Alberta conference  September 28 to 30, 2008, Banff, Alberta, Canada – Proceedings

Summary of the workshop

Presentations from 2008 RTNA Conference now available

abstracts

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Scope, Strategy and Structure: The Dynamics of Knowledge Networks in Medicine 15 January 2009

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Health Informatics, Knowledge Translation, Research |

Davide Consoli  &  Ronnie Ramlogan     Manchester Business School Working Paper No 569

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to analyse the dynamics of networks in which new knowledge emerges and through which it is exchanged. Our conjecture is that the structure of a network cannot be divorced from the dynamics of the knowledge  underpinning its activities. In so doing we look beyond studies based on the assumption of exogenous networks and delve into the mechanisms that stimulate their creation and transformation. In the first part the paper adopts a functional perspective and views networks as constructs aimed at the coordination of knowledge; accordingly, network structure is an emerging property that reflects the employment of an agreed strategy to achieve a collective scope. In the second part these themes are articulated in relation to the dynamics of medical innovation and enriched by an empirical study on the long-term evolution of medical research in Ophthalmology. This exercise highlights the connection between changes in scientific and practical knowledge and the reconfigurations of the epistemic network over a forty-year period. By mapping different network structures we capture variety in the gateways of knowledge creation – that is, the network participants – as well as in the pathways – that is, the inter-organisational collaborations. Our goal is to analyse how these patterns of interaction emerge and transform over time.

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