Infection Control

AHRQ and Joint Commission Launch E-Learning Module To Reduce Long Term Care Infections – [AHRQ = US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality]

Posted on July 23, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

AHRQ and Joint Commission Launch E-Learning Module To Reduce Long Term Care Infections – [AHRQ = US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality]

“Assisted living and nursing home staff at all levels can help prevent healthcare-associated infections by using a 50-minute e-learning tool based on high reliability principles. The online module teaches long-term care facilities to apply these principles, which can help them achieve safety, quality and efficiency goals, to prevent infections and achieve high safety performance over extended periods. The Joint Commission developed the e-learning module with partial funding from AHRQ. It features quizzes and a searchable database of practical resources. The free CDs and online format are available to all facilities, not only Joint Commission customers.”

Advertisements
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on AHRQ and Joint Commission Launch E-Learning Module To Reduce Long Term Care Infections – [AHRQ = US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality] )

Infection Prevention and Control of Epidemic- and Pandemic-Prone Acute Respiratory Infections in Health Care – WHO – 2014

Posted on July 8, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Respiratory Medicine | Tags: , |

Infection Prevention and Control of Epidemic- and Pandemic-Prone Acute Respiratory Infections in Health Care – WHO – 2014

“Overview

This publication is an update to the World Health Organization (WHO) interim guidelines Infection prevention and control of epidemic- and pandemic-prone acute respiratory diseases in health care (2007). These updated guidelines incorporate the emergency guidance given in the WHO publication Infection prevention and control during health care for confirmed, probable, or suspected cases of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus infection and influenza-like illness (2009). The revision was informed by both evidence that has emerged since the first edition was published and the practical lessons learnt during the influenza pandemic in 2009.

The WHO guidelines Infection prevention and control of epidemic- and pandemic-prone acute respiratory infections in health care provide recommendations, best practices and principles for non-pharmacological aspects of infection prevention and control (IPC) for acute respiratory infections (ARI) in health care, with special emphasis on ARI that can present as epidemics or pandemics. The guidelines are intended to help policy-makers, administrators and health-care workers to prioritize effective IPC measures.

The document also provides guidance on the application of basic IPC precautions, such as Standard Precautions, and on the importance of maintaining appropriate IPC measures in routine circumstances to strengthen a healthcare facility’s capacity to put them into practice during outbreaks. These measures should therefore be part of the hospital’s permanent IPC strategy.”

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Infection Prevention and Control of Epidemic- and Pandemic-Prone Acute Respiratory Infections in Health Care – WHO – 2014 )

Final Opinion on Nanosilver: safety, health and environmental effects and role in antimicrobial resistance – European Commission – 13 June 2014

Posted on June 17, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Final Opinion on Nanosilver: safety, health and environmental effects and role in antimicrobial resistance – European Commission – 13 June 2014

“Today, the European Commission and its non-food Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks, SCENIHR, published the final opinion on “Nanosilver: safety, health and environmental effects and role in antimicrobial resistance”.

The aim of this opinion is to assess whether the use of nanosilver, in particular in medical care and in consumer products, could result in additional risks compared to more traditional uses of silver and whether the use of nanosilver to control bacterial growth could result in resistance of micro-organisms.

SCENIHR concludes that the widespread (and increasing) use of silver containing products implicates that both consumers and the environment are exposed to new sources of silver. Human exposure is direct (food, hand-to-mouth contact, skin) and may be life long; while in the environment silver nanoparticles may be a particularly effective delivery system for silver to organisms in soil, water and sediment and may act as sources of ionic silver over extended periods of time. Therefore, additional effects caused by widespread and long term use of silver nanoparticles cannot be ruled out.

Regarding the hazard associated with the dissemination of the resistance mechanism following the use of silver nanoparticles, more data are needed to better understand bacterial response to ionic silver and silver nanoparticles exposure.”

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Final Opinion on Nanosilver: safety, health and environmental effects and role in antimicrobial resistance – European Commission – 13 June 2014 )

Serious cross-border health threats – European Union Public Health – 29 April 2014

Posted on May 1, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Serious cross-border health threats – European Union Public Health – 29 April 2014

According to Decision 1082/2013/EU on serious cross border health threats, the EU Member States consult each other within the Health Security Committee (HSC) and in liaison with the Commission with a view to exchanging information as regards serious cross border health threats and coordinating their response.
Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)

Latest update: 29.04.2014

Statement on MERS-CoV infection advice with regard to travelling   pdf(42 KB)

Statement on advice to Health Care Workers caring for patients with confirmed or possible MERS-CoV infection  pdf(42 KB)

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Serious cross-border health threats – European Union Public Health – 29 April 2014 )

Infection prevention and control (QS61) – NICE Quality Standard – April 2014

Posted on April 17, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

Infection prevention and control (QS61) – NICE Quality Standard – April 2014

News release: “NHS must renew hygiene efforts to tackle “unacceptable and avoidable” infection rates” – 17 April 2014

Extract:

“This latest NICE quality standard contains six statements designed to reduce infection rates, including a statement recommending that patients should be looked after by healthcare workers who always clean their hands thoroughly, both immediately before and immediately after contact or care.

The quality standard also aims to tackle the growing threat of antibiotic resistance by recommending that antibiotics be prescribed only in accordance with local antibiotic formularies – as part of a system to stem resistance of infections to antibiotics.”

… continues on the site

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Infection prevention and control (QS61) – NICE Quality Standard – April 2014 )

Enterococci: From Commensals to Leading Causes of Drug Resistant Infection – eBook, NCBI – 2014

Posted on March 25, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

Enterococci: From Commensals to Leading Causes of Drug Resistant Infection – eBook, NCBI – 2014

“Over the past 30 years, multidrug resistant enterococci have emerged as leading causes of hospital acquired infection. With the acquisition of resistance to vancomycin in the mid 1980’s many of these infections became extremely difficult to treat. To address this problem, researchers with an interest in various aspects of enterococcal biology have come together to consolidate much of what is known about this genus into a single text. Enterococci: From commensals to leading causes of drug resistant infection provides state-of-the-art summaries of what is known about 1) Their origins, distribution in nature and gut colonization, 2) Infection – history, incidence, and pathology, 3) Enterococci as indicators of contamination and in public policy, 4) Infection treatment and antibiotic resistance, 5) Pathogenesis and models of enterococcal infection, 6) Comparative enterococcal genomics, 7) Nature, maintenance and transmission of extrachromosomal elements, 8) Enterococcal phage and genome defense, 9) Transcriptional and post transcriptional control of enterococcal gene regulation, 10) Enterococcal cell wall components and structures, 11) Enterococcal biofilm structure and role in colonization and disease, 12) Metabolic and physiologic traits that contribute to the special biology of enterococci, and 13) Enterococcal bacteriocins and other bacterial factors that contribute to niche control.”

 

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Enterococci: From Commensals to Leading Causes of Drug Resistant Infection – eBook, NCBI – 2014 )

Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in 2012–2013 – nhpa – National Health Performance Authority – 13 March 2014

Posted on March 14, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in 2012–2013 – nhpa – National Health Performance Authority – 13 March 2014

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in 2012–2013 – nhpa – National Health Performance Authority – 13 March 2014 )

Risk assessment on the spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) through patient transfer between healthcare facilities, with special emphasis on cross-border transfer – European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control – 2011

Posted on February 26, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

Risk assessment on the spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) through patient transfer between healthcare facilities, with special emphasis on cross-border transfer – European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control – 2011

Stockholm: ECDC; September 2011.

ISBN 978-92-9193-317-4
doi: 10.2900/59034

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Risk assessment on the spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) through patient transfer between healthcare facilities, with special emphasis on cross-border transfer – European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control – 2011 )

Acute trust toolkit for the early detection, management and control of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae – Public Health England – December 2013

Posted on February 4, 2014. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

Acute trust toolkit for the early detection, management and control of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae – Public Health England – December 2013

“Synopsis

This toolkit incorporates, in an updated form, the January 2011 ‘Advice on Carbapenemase Producers: Recognition, infection control and treatment’ issued jointly by Department of Health Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection (ARHAI) and the Health Protection Agency (HPA).

This toolkit provides practical advice for clinicians, and staff at the frontline in an acute care setting (a similar toolkit is being prepared for the non-acute care setting). It also provides some basic public health risk assessment tools and advice and information for the patient.

The advice in this toolkit is applicable to both the NHS and the Independent Sector, into which many high-risk patients are admitted from outside the UK2. If the infection, prevention and control (IP&C) advice in this toolkit does not ‘fit’ your situation, IP&C teams can obtain further advice and signposting, particularly in relation to local risk assessment, through their local PHE Centre.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Acute trust toolkit for the early detection, management and control of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae – Public Health England – December 2013 )

Healthcare Associated Infections – litigation and reputation – MindMetre – January 2014

Posted on January 24, 2014. Filed under: Health Economics, Infection Control | Tags: |

Healthcare Associated Infections – litigation and reputation – MindMetre – January 2014

“A MindMetre research note on the reputational risk to healthcare institutions of litigation by patients suing as a result of an HCAI

Health economics studies of return on investment from screening for Healthcare Associated Infections (HCAIs) have tended to focus only on the consequent reduction in patient treatment costs. A few studies have also looked at the direct impact of patient lawsuits resulting from HCAIs, but here only in terms of the cost of damages and legal fees. This short research note suggests that, in the newly structured NHS, where groups of GPs – Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) – are now commissioning acute services, where competition for service provision between trusts is overtly encouraged, and where there is a clear mandate to ‘ improve patient outcomes’, HCAI rates are likely to play an increasing role in the ability of a trust to attract patients and the funds that come with them.”

… continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Healthcare Associated Infections – litigation and reputation – MindMetre – January 2014 )

Measures for the Prevention and Control of Clostridium difficile Infection – NZ Ministry of Health – 26 November 2013

Posted on December 18, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases |

Measures for the Prevention and Control of Clostridium difficile Infection – NZ Ministry of Health – 26 November 2013

“Guidance to the health care sector

Clostridium difficile infection is a growing problem in inpatient healthcare facilities and can lead to extended hospital stays, poor patient outcomes and occasionally death.

This document is a practical tool to assist care providers to follow best practice, evidence based processes for prevention, surveillance, and diagnosis.

This guidance was developed with input from the Healthcare Associated Infections Governance Group (HAIGG) whose membership extends across the health sector. The guidance draws on national and international evidence.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Measures for the Prevention and Control of Clostridium difficile Infection – NZ Ministry of Health – 26 November 2013 )

Recommendations for the control of Multi-drug resistant Gram-negatives: carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriacea – The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – 9 December 2013

Posted on December 18, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

Recommendations for the control of Multi-drug resistant Gram-negatives: carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriacea – The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – 9 December 2013

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Recommendations for the control of Multi-drug resistant Gram-negatives: carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriacea – The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – 9 December 2013 )

Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 – CDC – 16 September 2013

Posted on September 17, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , , |

Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 – CDC – 16 September 2013

“This report, Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 gives a first-ever snapshot of the burden and threats posed by the antibiotic-resistant germs having the most impact on human health.

Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections. Many more people die from other conditions that were complicated by an antibiotic-resistant infection.

Antibiotic-resistant infections can happen anywhere. Data show that most happen in the general community; however, most deaths related to antibiotic resistance happen in healthcare settings such as hospitals and nursing homes.”

Press release: Untreatable: Report by CDC details today’s drug-resistant health threats Landmark report ranks threats, outlines four core actions to halt resistance

Digital Press Kit: Untreatable: Today’s Drug-Resistant Health Threats

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Antibiotic resistance threats in the United States, 2013 – CDC – 16 September 2013 )

Guidance for infection control in the built environment [UK] – 26 March 2013

Posted on April 8, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Guidance for infection control in the built environment [UK] – 26 March 2013

“This guidance (HBN 00-09) discusses the various stages of a capital build project from initial concept through to post-project evaluation and highlights the major IPC issues and risks that need to be addressed at each particular stage to achieve designed-in IPC.”

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Guidance for infection control in the built environment [UK] – 26 March 2013 )

New CDC Vital Signs: Lethal, Drug-resistant Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Healthcare Facilities – 5 March 2013

Posted on March 6, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

New CDC Vital Signs: Lethal, Drug-resistant Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Healthcare Facilities – 5 March 2013

“Drug-resistant germs called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, are on the rise and have become more resistant to last-resort antibiotics during the past decade, according to a new CDC Vital Signs report.  These bacteria are causing more hospitalized patients to get infections that, in some cases, are impossible to treat.”

… continues on the site

Making Health Care Safer: Stop Infections from Lethal CRE Germs Now – CDC Vital Signs – March 2013

“Untreatable and hard-to-treat infections from CRE germs are on the rise among patients in medical facilities. CRE germs have become resistant to all or nearly all the antibiotics we have today. Types of CRE include KPC and NDM. By following CDC guidelines, we can halt CRE infections before they become widespread in hospitals and other medical facilities and potentially spread to otherwise healthy people outside of medical facilities.”

… continues

Media release: CDC: Action needed now to halt spread of deadly bacteria

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on New CDC Vital Signs: Lethal, Drug-resistant Bacteria Spreading in U.S. Healthcare Facilities – 5 March 2013 )

Australian hospital statistics 2011-12: Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals – AIHW – 22 January 2013

Posted on January 24, 2013. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Patient Safety | Tags: |

Australian hospital statistics 2011-12: Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals – AIHW – 22 January 2013

“In 2011-12, all states and territories had rates of hospital-associated Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) below the national benchmark, with rates ranging from 0.7 to 1.3 cases per 10,000 patient days. There were 1,734 cases of hospital-associated SAB reported for Australia, which occurred during approximately 18.5 million days of patient care.”

ISSN 1036-613X; ISBN 978-1-74249-395-4; Cat. no. HSE 129

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Australian hospital statistics 2011-12: Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals – AIHW – 22 January 2013 )

European Commission report on the implementation of the Council Recommendation on patient safety, including the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections – 13 November 2012

Posted on November 29, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control, Patient Safety |

European Commission report on the implementation of the Council Recommendation on patient safety, including the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections – 13 November 2012

“EU – Report from the Commission to the Council on the basis of Member States’ reports on the implementation of the Council Recommendation (2009/C 151/01) on patient safety, including the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections

In June 2009, the Council adopted a Recommendation on patient safety, including the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections (2009/C 151/01), referred to here as the Recommendation.

The Recommendation consists of two chapters. In the first chapter on general patient safety, Member States are asked to put in place a series of measures with a view to minimising harm to patients receiving healthcare. These measures include developing national policies on patient safety, empowering and informing patients, establishing reporting and learning systems on adverse events, promoting the education and training of healthcare workers, and developing research. The Recommendation invites the Member States to share knowledge, experience and best practice and to classify and codify patient safety at EU level by working with each other and with the Commission.

In the second chapter on the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), Member States are asked to adopt and implement a strategy at the appropriate level for the prevention and control of HAIs and to consider setting up an inter-sectoral mechanism or equivalent system for the coordinated implementation of such a strategy. This strategy should comprise infection prevention and control measures at national/regional level and at the level of healthcare institutions, surveillance systems, the education and training of healthcare workers, information to patients, and research.

This Report summarises the main actions taken at Member State and EU level by June 2011 (July 2012 for the general patient safety part) and highlights those areas of the Recommendation needing further attention. It is accompanied by a Commission Staff Working Document providing a more detailed technical analysis of the replies received. In this Report, only the replies at national level are presented3; the Commission Staff Working Document includes analyses of the replies both from national and regional levels. Where this Report refers to countries, it means the EU Member States and  Norway.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on European Commission report on the implementation of the Council Recommendation on patient safety, including the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections – 13 November 2012 )

Toolkit for Reduction of Clostridium difficile Infections Through Antimicrobial Stewardship – AHRQ – September 2012

Posted on November 9, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

Toolkit for Reduction of Clostridium difficile Infections Through Antimicrobial Stewardship – AHRQ – September 2012

AHRQ = Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

The Evaluation and Research on Antimicrobial Stewardship’s Effect on Clostridium difficile (ERASE C. difficile) Project

“Clostridium difficile infection (C. difficile) is a serious public health problem that has recently increased in both incidence and severity. Taking steps to reduce C. difficile is a major health and public health imperative. Antimicrobial stewardship targeted to C. difficile reduction shows promise, because increased rates of C. difficile are associated with inappropriate antibiotic use. An antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) is a systematic approach to developing coordinated interventions to reduce overuse and inappropriate selection of antibiotics, and to achieve optimal outcomes for patients in cost-efficient ways. This toolkit assists hospital staff and leadership in developing an effective ASP with the potential to reduce C. difficile.”

Toolkit for Reduction of Clostridium difficile Infections Through Antimicrobial Stewardship. (Prepared by the Boston University School of Public Health, under AHRQ ACTION Contract No. HHSA290200600012i TO10.) AHRQ Publication No. 12-0082-EF, September 2012. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Toolkit for Reduction of Clostridium difficile Infections Through Antimicrobial Stewardship – AHRQ – September 2012 )

The Hygiene Hypothesis and its implications for home hygiene, lifestyle and public health – International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene – September 2012

Posted on October 23, 2012. Filed under: Immunology and Allergy, Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: |

The Hygiene Hypothesis and its implications for home hygiene, lifestyle and public health – International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene – September 2012

Rosalind Stanwell Smith, Sally F. Bloomfield, Graham A. Rook

Extract from the summary

“During the late 20th century, increasing levels of allergic disorders [atopy] prompted much research and debate about possible causes. The predominant explanation, postulated as the ‘hygiene hypothesis’ by Strachan in 1989, implicated smaller family sizes, higher standards of cleanliness, and presumed less contact with childhood infections. The idea was widely taken up by the media as the engaging notion that developed societies have become ‘too clean’. The concept of modern life being cleaner than is good for us was always an over-simplification and misinterpretation of informed medical or scientific opinion, but as a simple idea to grasp in a very complicated story, it has remained very persistent. Possibly its continued popular repetition relates to a general disquiet about many of the changes that have occurred in human society. It has taken only a century or so to transform our societies from mainly rural communities to urban concrete and plastic environments, with cleaner water and safer sanitation. Our home and working environments, diet and other aspects of lifestyle have changed beyond recognition in a very short time. The concept of the hygiene hypothesis has now been extended to the increase in other chronic inflammatory diseases (CIDs), including autoimmune diseases such as type1 diabetes (T1D) and multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and some cancers.

We previously reviewed the research associated with the hygiene hypothesis in 2004, concluding that ‘microbial hypothesis’ would be a better name, since the reference to hygiene in the term gave inappropriate emphasis to the ‘too clean’ notion, which was not supported by evidence of continuing infection threats in the home and elsewhere, or by evidence that modern domestic and personal cleaning habits had reduced microbial exposure. This updated review is necessary because of new research and analysis, such as the extension of variants of the hygiene hypothesis to the larger group of CIDs and also to a wider range of postulated causes. While contemporary microbial exposure is no longer the sole focus of such research, an update is also needed regarding the implications for preventing invasive infectious disease by hygiene practices. The continued reference to ‘hygiene’ as a possible cause of allergy or other disease is confusing and potentially dangerous, if it makes people ignore the consequences of poor food hygiene, lack of hand washing and cleaning to remove possible pathogens from our homes and other environments.

This updated review further examines the evidence for changed microbial exposure, or the lack of it, as a cause for allergy and the chronic inflammatory diseases that have increased in recent decades.”
… continues on the site

ABC Health Report on this

“A new report released in the UK from the International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene dismantles the myth of the hygiene hypothesis, that the rise in allergies and asthma in recent years has happened because we’re living in sterile homes and are overdoing hygiene.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on The Hygiene Hypothesis and its implications for home hygiene, lifestyle and public health – International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene – September 2012 )

Improving the Measurement of Surgical Site Infection Risk Stratification/Outcome Detection – The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US] – August 2012

Posted on October 22, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control, Surgery | Tags: |

Improving the Measurement of Surgical Site Infection Risk Stratification/Outcome Detection – The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US] – August 2012

Final Contract Report

“The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, in cooperation with the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, commissioned a study in 2009 with the objective of developing techniques to improve the identification and surveillance of likely cases of surgical site infection using data on four common procedures (hernia repair, coronary artery bypass grafts, and hip and knee arthroplasty). A major focus of the project was to test the usefulness of computer algorithms that could alert infection control specialists to patients likely to have surgical site infections on the basis of retrospective analysis of electronic medical records, laboratory test results, and patient demographics.

Prepared for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality under contract HHSA 290-2006-00-20.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Improving the Measurement of Surgical Site Infection Risk Stratification/Outcome Detection – The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US] – August 2012 )

New Queen’s University Belfast plasma jet gives ‘cold’ shoulder to superbugs – 3 October 2012

Posted on October 5, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases |

New Queen’s University Belfast plasma jet gives ‘cold’ shoulder to superbugs – 3 October 2012

“Scientists at Queen’s have developed a new technique which has the potential to kill off hospital superbugs like C. difficile and MRSA.

As revealed in the most recent edition of leading journal PloS One, the novel method uses a cold plasma jet to rapidly penetrate dense bacterial structures known as biofilms which bind bacteria together and make them resistant to conventional chemical approaches.

The new approach developed by scientists in the School of Mathematics and Physics and the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s passes electrical currents through flowing gas mixtures to create a wide variety of reactive species. These then effectively penetrate biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA and rapidly kill the bacteria within.

Currently antibiotics and disinfectants are used to target bugs in hospitals like C. difficile and MRSA. Effective in killing individual bacteria, they are often ineffective against complex organised communities of bacteria.”

… continues

Media report: Belfast university team to target superbugs like pseudomonas – BBC – 3 October 2012

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on New Queen’s University Belfast plasma jet gives ‘cold’ shoulder to superbugs – 3 October 2012 )

AHRQ Patient Safety Project Reduces Bloodstream Infections by 40 Percent – 10 September 2012

Posted on September 11, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control, Intensive Care | Tags: , |

AHRQ Patient Safety Project Reduces Bloodstream Infections by 40 Percent – 10 September 2012

“A unique nationwide patient safety project funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) reduced the rate of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in intensive care units by 40 percent, according to the agency’s preliminary findings of the largest national effort to combat CLABSIs to date. The project used the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP) to achieve its landmark results that include preventing more than 2,000 CLABSIs, saving more than 500 lives and avoiding more than $34 million in health care costs.”

… continues

Details about AHRQ’s national CUSP project are available at http://www.ahrq.gov/qual/hais.htm. AHRQ’s CUSP toolkit is available at http://www.ahrq.gov/cusptoolkit/ .”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on AHRQ Patient Safety Project Reduces Bloodstream Infections by 40 Percent – 10 September 2012 )

A Cure for Filthy Phones – Government Technology – 2 August 2012

Posted on August 3, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

A Cure for Filthy Phones – Government Technology – 2 August 2012

“Seventy-five percent of people use their phone in the bathroom, so it’s no wonder that researchers found the following:

16% of phones had E. coli (commonly found in fecal material)
82% of phones had other harmful bacteria

The invention to clean up the mess: PhoneSoap, which uses ultraviolet C (UV-C) light to reportedly kill 99 percent of those germs. Users simply put the phone in the device for three to five minutes. UV-C light is safe and used in the health-care industry to sanitize materials, the manufacturer says. PhoneSoap retails for $40, and was developed using seed money from crowdfunding site Kickstarter.”

 

 

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on A Cure for Filthy Phones – Government Technology – 2 August 2012 )

Evaluation for the Programme: Developing and Sustaining a Practice Based Strategy for Reducing Healthcare Associated Infections – Foundation of Nursing Studies (FoNS) in partnership with NHS London – 30 July 2012

Posted on August 1, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control |

Evaluation for the Programme: Developing and Sustaining a Practice Based Strategy for Reducing Healthcare Associated Infections – Foundation of Nursing Studies (FoNS) in partnership with NHS London – 30 July 2012

Media release

“16 project teams started the programme, 13 completed the programme/project, and 13 project teams provided a final report (11 reports as some teams combined reporting).

Through the collection of multiple forms of evidence this evaluation found that nine teams reported reductions in healthcare associated infections and/or improvements in practice that would contribute to reducing risks of healthcare associated infections. Of significance in achieving this was the:

• Clinical leadership roles held by project leaders (e.g. ward managers)
• Effective strategic support
• Use of a wide range of practice development methods
• Involvement of the clinical teams

This report expands on the participants’ experience of the programme, outcome for practice and key learning that has relevance for a wide range of practice areas seeking to develop, change and improve practice.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Evaluation for the Programme: Developing and Sustaining a Practice Based Strategy for Reducing Healthcare Associated Infections – Foundation of Nursing Studies (FoNS) in partnership with NHS London – 30 July 2012 )

English National Point Prevalence Survey on Healthcare-associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use, 2011: preliminary data – Health Protection Agency – 22 May 2012

Posted on May 25, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control, Patient Safety | Tags: |

English National Point Prevalence Survey on Healthcare-associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use, 2011: preliminary data – Health Protection Agency – 22 May 2012

Media release: Snapshot survey of healthcare associated infections (HCAI) reveals overall drop in infections down to 6.4 per cent – 23 May 2012

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on English National Point Prevalence Survey on Healthcare-associated Infections and Antimicrobial Use, 2011: preliminary data – Health Protection Agency – 22 May 2012 )

Technical guidance issued for healthcare providers on managing Pseudomonas – [UK] – 30 March, 2012

Posted on April 2, 2012. Filed under: Environmental Health, Infection Control, Infectious Diseases |

Technical guidance issued for healthcare providers on managing Pseudomonas – [UK] – 30 March, 2012

“Further to guidance issued in February by the Chief Medical Officer  additional best practice technical guidance is being published today.

The guidance is aimed at those healthcare organisations providing patient care in augmented care units, such as paediatric and adult critical care, neonatal and burns units and provides advice for health care providers on:

assessing the risk to patients if water systems become contaminated with P. aeruginosa or other opportunistic pathogens;

what actions to take if water systems become contaminated with P. aeruginosa;

protocols for sampling, testing and monitoring water for P. aeruginosa: and

developing local water safety plans.

The guidance encourages healthcare organisations to develop a local plan for risk assessing augmented care units by June 2012 with appropriate water sampling by the end of 2012.

Read the guidance: Water sources and potential Pseudomonas aeruginosa contamination of taps and water systems – Advice for augmented care unit

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Technical guidance issued for healthcare providers on managing Pseudomonas – [UK] – 30 March, 2012 )

Infection: prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care – NICE – 28 March 2012

Posted on March 28, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

Infection: prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care – NICE – 28 March 2012

Clinical guidelines, CG139 – Issued: March 2012

“This clinical guideline (published March 2012) updates and replaces NICE clinical guideline 2 (published June 2003). It offers evidence-based advice on the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care. New and updated recommendations address areas in which clinical practice for preventing healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care has changed, where the risk of healthcare-associated infections is greatest, and where the evidence has changed.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Infection: prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections in primary and community care – NICE – 28 March 2012 )

Septris – Tetris-like game helps physicians treat sepsis – Healthcare IT News – 16 March 2012

Posted on March 20, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Tetris-like game helps physicians treat sepsis – Healthcare IT News – 16 March 2012

by Diana Manos, Senior Editor

“STANFORD, CA – Researchers at Stanford University have designed an interactive case-based online activity to help clinicians prevent and treat sepsis, a life-threatening infection that takes more than 200,000 lives each year.

The online activity is called Septris and is inspired by the popular online game Tetris. The game runs best on iPad, iPhone or Android. On a desktop PC it requires Firefox 5+, Google Chrome, or Apple Safari. Internet Explorer is not supported, according to designers of the game.

Septris is used to help clinicians identify and manage sepsis, which strikes approximately 750,000 people in the U.S. Mortality remains high at 25 to 50 percent, at a cost of $17 billion each year, say Stanford researchers.

The activity provides a practical approach to early sepsis identification and application of evidence-based management and Stanford’s Sepsis Guidelines. Interactive case scenarios are used to put these principles into practice. The game developers note, however, that the game is an educational tool and the clinical information found in the game is part an enduring educational material. It should not take the place of practitioner decision-making in clinical circumstances.”

… continues on the site

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Septris – Tetris-like game helps physicians treat sepsis – Healthcare IT News – 16 March 2012 )

Holographic nurse helps UCLH reduce the risk of infection

Posted on February 20, 2012. Filed under: Infection Control |

Holographic nurse helps UCLH reduce the risk of infection

“University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is the first hospital in the country to introduce a holographic ‘Virtual Nurse’ to greet staff and patients on their arrival and remind them about the importance of following good infection control practice.

As well as advising staff, patients and visitors about the importance of hand hygiene and cleanliness, the virtual nurse also keeps patients and visitors informed about other trust projects.

The Virtual Nurse is just one tactic being used by UCLH to improve awareness of the importance of infection control.

Funded by Interserve and provided by The Healthcare Messaging Group, the Virtual Nurse is reflected via high definition video projectors onto a specially developed material which produces a crystal clear image.”

… continues on the site

also commentary here

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Holographic nurse helps UCLH reduce the risk of infection )

Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High Containment Biological Laboratories – National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council – 2011

Posted on December 20, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Pathology | Tags: , |

Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High Containment Biological Laboratories – National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council – 2011

ISBN-10: 0-309-22575-2    ISBN-13: 978-0-309-22575-5

“During July 10-13, 2011, 68 participants from 32 countries gathered in Istanbul, Turkey for a workshop organized by the United States National Research Council on Anticipating Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High-containment Biological Laboratories. The United States Department of State’s Biosecurity Engagement Program sponsored the workshop, which was held in partnership with the Turkish Academy of Sciences. The international workshop examined biosafety and biosecurity issues related to the design, construction, maintenance, and operation of high-containment biological laboratories- equivalent to United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention biological safety level 3 or 4 labs. Although these laboratories are needed to characterize highly dangerous human and animal pathogens, assist in disease surveillance, and produce vaccines, they are complex systems with inherent risks.

Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High-Containment Biological Laboratories summarizes the workshop discussion, which included the following topics:

Technological options to meet diagnostic, research, and other goals;
Laboratory construction and commissioning;
Operational maintenance to provide sustainable capabilities, safety, and security; and
Measures for encouraging a culture of responsible conduct.
 
Workshop attendees described the history and current challenges they face in their individual laboratories. Speakers recounted steps they were taking to improve safety and security, from running training programs to implementing a variety of personnel reliability measures. Many also spoke about physical security, access controls, and monitoring pathogen inventories. Workshop participants also identified tensions in the field and suggested possible areas for action.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Biosecurity Challenges of the Global Expansion of High Containment Biological Laboratories – National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council – 2011 )

Eliminating Central Line Infections and Spreading Success at High-Performing Hospitals – The Commonwealth Fund – 1 December 2011

Posted on December 6, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

Eliminating Central Line Infections and Spreading Success at High-Performing Hospitals – The Commonwealth Fund – 1 December 2011

“Overview
One of the most common types of health care–associated infections is the central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), which can result when a central venous catheter is not inserted or maintained properly. About 43,000 CLABSIs occurred in hospitals in 2009; nearly one of five infected patients died as a result. This report synthesizes lessons from four hospitals that reported they did not experience any CLABSIs in their intensive care units in 2009. Lessons include: the importance of following evidencebased protocols to prevent infection; the need for dedicated teams to oversee all central line insertions; the value of participation in statewide, national, or regional CLABSI collaboratives or initiatives; and the necessity for close monitoring of infection rates, giving feedback to staff, and applying internal and external goals. The report also presents ways these hospitals are spreading prevention techniques to non-ICU units, and strategies for preventing other health care–associated infections.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Eliminating Central Line Infections and Spreading Success at High-Performing Hospitals – The Commonwealth Fund – 1 December 2011 )

Sharps safety – Royal College of Nursing – 29 November 2011

Posted on November 30, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Nursing, Occupational Hlth Safety | Tags: , |

Sharps safety – Royal College of Nursing – 29 November 2011
 
Publication code: 004 135   ISBN: 978-1-906633-90-5

Abstract:

“The RCN has a long history of campaigning on improved protection for nurses and other health care professionals exposed to the risk of needlestick and other sharps injuries. This guidance has been developed primarily for RCN safety representatives, but other members of the nursing team with a role in infection prevention and control of sharps injuries may also find it useful. The guidance covers the law on sharps injuries, including the European Directive 2010/32/EU and its underlying principles as well as its requirements on health care providers. It also includes information on preparing your organisation, introducing risk assessments, selecting and evaluating safety-engineered devices and it details what employers should be doing to comply with the directive and minimise the risk of sharps injuries. It also includes a checklist to help safety representatives assess organisational and ward/departmental level compliance with the directive.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Sharps safety – Royal College of Nursing – 29 November 2011 )

Australian hospital statistics 2010-2011: staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals – AIHW – 30 November 2011

Posted on November 30, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Patient Safety | Tags: |

Australian hospital statistics 2010-2011: staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals – AIHW – 30 November 2011

“In 2010-11: all states and territories had rates of hospital-associated SAB below the national benchmark with rates ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 cases per 10, 000 patient days; there were 1,873 cases of hospital-associated SAB reported for Australia. The reported SAB cases occurred during approximately 17 million days of patient care.”

ISSN 1036-613X; ISBN 978-1-74249-263-6; Cat. no. HSE 116; 15pp

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Australian hospital statistics 2010-2011: staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in Australian public hospitals – AIHW – 30 November 2011 )

Guidelines for the management of norovirus outbreaks in acute and community health and social care settings – Health Protection Agency – 25 November 2011

Posted on November 28, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Guidelines for the management of norovirus outbreaks in acute and community health and social care settings – Health Protection Agency – 25 November 2011

“This guidance gives recommendations on the management of outbreaks of vomiting and/or diarrhoea in hospitals and community health and social care settings, including nursing and residential homes. They are not specifically intended to cover schools, colleges, prisons, military establishments, hotels or shipping although there will be some general principles that will be of use in managing outbreaks in those institutions.”

Media release

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Guidelines for the management of norovirus outbreaks in acute and community health and social care settings – Health Protection Agency – 25 November 2011 )

Design Bugs Out: product evaluation report – Department of Health [UK] – 18 November 2011

Posted on November 22, 2011. Filed under: Hosp Design Planning Architecture, Infection Control | Tags: |

Design Bugs Out: product evaluation report – Department of Health [UK] – 18 November 2011

“The Design Bugs Out (DBO) project aimed to bring designers and manufacturers together with clinicla specialists, patients and frontline staff to help combat infections by making hospital furniture and equipment easier and quicker to clean. This report details the subsequent evaluation of four DBO products.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Design Bugs Out: product evaluation report – Department of Health [UK] – 18 November 2011 )

Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections quality improvement guide – NICE – 9 November 2011

Posted on November 14, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Patient Safety | Tags: |

Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections quality improvement guide – NICE – 9 November 2011

“Following a referral from the Department of Health, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), in partnership with the Health Protection Agency (HPA), have developed this quality improvement guide. The guide offers advice on management or organisational actions to prevent and control healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) in secondary care settings.

The guide is aimed at board members working in (or with) secondary care. It may also be of use to senior managers, those working elsewhere in the NHS, as well as those working in local authorities and the wider public, private, voluntary and community sectors.

In producing this guide, NICE and the HPA have assumed that all secondary care settings are compliant with the current code of practice on preventing and controlling infections[1].

The guide aims to help build on advice given in the code and elsewhere to improve the quality of care and practice in these areas over and above current standards. Taken together, the quality improvement statements contained in this guide describe excellence in care and practice to prevent and control HCAIs. Examples of evidence and other data to demonstrate progress against each statement are provided.

NICE and the HPA recognise that a range of factors associated with infection prevention and control have the potential to impact on health inequalities (for example, in relation to age, ethnicity, gender and disability). However, the relative impact of different factors will vary for different organisations. NICE and the HPA expect trusts and other secondary care organisations to consider local issues in relation to health inequalities when implementing this guide.”

… continues on the site

HPA commentary

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Prevention and control of healthcare-associated infections quality improvement guide – NICE – 9 November 2011 )

Prepositioning Antibiotics for Anthrax – Institute of Medicine – 30 September 2011

Posted on October 3, 2011. Filed under: Disaster Management, Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

Prepositioning Antibiotics for Anthrax – Institute of Medicine – 30 September 2011

“If terrorists released Bacillus anthracis over a large city, hundreds of thousands of people could be at risk of the deadly disease anthrax – caused by the B anthracis spores – unless they had rapid access to antibiotic medical countermeasures (MCM). The spores can be inhaled, be ingested, or come into contact with the skin. Inhalational anthrax is considered the most severe bioterrorism threat because the spores can travel significant distances through the air, and it has the highest mortality rate – approaching 100 percent if untreated. Although plans for rapidly delivering MCM to a large number of people following an anthrax attack have been significantly enhanced over the last decade, many public health authorities and policy experts fear that the nation’s current systems and plans are insufficient to respond to the most challenging scenarios, such as a very large-scale anthrax attack or an attack on multiple cities.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response commissioned the IOM to examine the potential uses, benefits, and disadvantages of strategies for prepositioning antibiotics. This involves storing antibiotics close to or in the possession of the people who would need rapid access to them should an attack occur. The IOM defined and evaluated three categories of prepositioning strategies that could complement existing, centralized stockpiling strategies, including the Strategic National Stockpile maintained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Forward-Deployed MCM: MCM stored near the locations from which they will be dispensed
Cached MCM: MCM stored at the locations from which they will be dispensed, such as workplaces and health care facilities
Predispensed MCM: MCM stored by the intended users

While prepositioning strategies have the potential to reduce the time between an anthrax attack and when an individual receives antibiotics, this potential benefit should be weighed against increased costs of associated with prepositioning strategies, a lower degree of flexibility to change plans following an attack if needed, and possible health risks involved with home antibiotic storage. The IOM committee developed a decision-aiding framework to help state, local, and tribal health officials determine which prepositioning strategies—if any—would benefit their communities.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( Comments Off on Prepositioning Antibiotics for Anthrax – Institute of Medicine – 30 September 2011 )

Eliminating CLABSI: A National Patient Safety Imperative – Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US] – September 2011

Posted on September 15, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

Eliminating CLABSI: A National Patient Safety Imperative – Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [US] – September 2011
Second Progress Report on the National On the CUSP: Stop BSI Project

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is funding a national effort to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (BSIs) in U.S. hospitals by implementing a Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP). The On the CUSP: Stop BSI project is a unique partnership with the Health Research & Educational Trust, the Johns Hopkins University Quality and Safety Research Group, and the Michigan Health & Hospital Association’s Keystone Center for Patient Safety & Quality. This second report summarizes progress made in the first 2 years of the On the CUSP: Stop BSI project.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

HHS Unveils New Interactive Video to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections – 13 May 2011

Posted on May 17, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control |

HHS Unveils New Interactive Video to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections
New Training Supports Goals of Partnership for Patients

“The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health today released Partnering to Heal: Teaming Up Against Healthcare-Associated Infections, an interactive computer-based video-simulation training program. This training program helps support the goals of the Partnership for Patients, a new public-private partnership that will help improve the quality, safety and affordability of health care for all Americans.

The video teaches viewers how to prevent the most prevalent hospital-acquired infections by sharing knowledge of universal and isolation precautions to take in healthcare settings. The training is designed to increase knowledge, alter attitudes, and shift the behaviors of clinicians and patients by focusing on principles of teamwork, communication, hand washing, flu vaccination, and the appropriate use of antibiotics and medical devices. Partnering to Heal is designed to be used as a facilitated training session or by individuals as a self-paced learning tool. “

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Safe management of healthcare waste 2nd ed – [UK] Department of Health – 25 March 2011

Posted on April 29, 2011. Filed under: Environmental Health, Health Mgmt Policy Planning, Infection Control, Occupational Hlth Safety |

Safe management of healthcare waste 2nd ed – [UK] Department of Health – 25 March 2011

Health Technical Memorandum 07-01: Safe management for healthcare waste

“This document provides a framework for good practice for the management of healthcare waste.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Longitudinal Program Evaluation of HHS Healthcare Associated Infections (HAI) National Action Plan (NAP) – RAND – April 2011

Posted on April 27, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

Longitudinal Program Evaluation of HHS Healthcare Associated Infections (HAI) National Action Plan (NAP) – RAND – April 2011
Year 1 Report
by Peter Mendel, Daniel Weissbein, Daniel Weinberg, Rebecca Shaw, Donna O. Farley, David P. Baker, Katherine L. Kahn

“The widespread prevalence and enormous cost of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) have been recognized as public and personal-level health problems. An estimated 1.7 million HAIs are diagnosed annually in hospitals and are associated with approximately 100,000 deaths. However, substantial opportunities exist for adopting evidence-based processes to reduce rates of HAIs. In June 2009 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued the Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections, which established national goals for HAI prevention, including key actions for achieving identified short- and long-term objectives over the next five years. The National Evaluation of the HHS Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections is a large-scale formative evaluation project conducted by IMPAQ International and the RAND Corporation. The evaluation seeks to establish baseline data and provide feedback on how to strengthen ongoing assessments of the scope of HAIs and interventions, how to reduce HAIs, and how to begin to understand the effectiveness of those interventions. This report presents the results of the first year of the team’s evaluation, which focused on a document and literature review and interviews with key stakeholders to gain information about the context in which the action plan was developed. Future years will assess processes associated with the action plan and resulting products. Recommendations include increasing the engagement of stakeholders both within and external to the federal government, acknowledging prevalent conceptual and implementation tensions between differing major perspectives on HAIs, and creating a supplementary document to outline the steps necessary to achieve each action plan goal.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Antimicrobial Stewardship in Australian Hospitals 2011 – Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – January 2011

Posted on April 8, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Antimicrobial Stewardship in Australian Hospitals 2011 – Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care – January 2011
Editors: Margaret Duguid and Marilyn Cruickshank

Paperback ISBN 978-0-9806298-9-7
Online ISBN 978-0-9870617-0-6

“This book is a culmination of the work of a dedicated group of clinicians committed to improving antimicrobial use in hospitals and reducing the risk of harm to patients from inappropriate antimicrobial prescribing.

In particular, the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care would like to thank the members of the Antimicrobial Stewardship Advisory Committee for their generosity in giving their time and expertise on top of already busy workloads to contribute to the publication.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Preventing Transmission of Pandemic Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory Diseases: Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Personnel Update 2010 – Institute of Medicine [US] – Released: 27 January 2011

Posted on January 28, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu, Workforce | Tags: , , |

Preventing Transmission of Pandemic Influenza and Other Viral Respiratory Diseases: Personal Protective Equipment for Healthcare Personnel Update 2010 – Institute of Medicine [US] – Released: 27 January 2011

Full text online

“In light of the unanswered research questions following the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) asked the IOM to assess the progress of PPE research and to identify future directions for PPE for healthcare personnel. While the IOM finds that there are gaps and deficiencies in the research about PPE use in health care, there is sufficient knowledge to recommend a four-pronged strategy for effective PPE use:

Deliberate planning and preparation at the leadership and organizational levels
Comprehensive training for all personnel, including supervisors and managers
Widespread and convenient availability of appropriate PPE devices
Accountability at all levels of the organization

The IOM also offers several recommendations for continuing the momentum of PPE research that are detailed in the report and the report brief. The more scientists and researchers know about how to maximize the effectiveness of PPE and its use, the more prepared we will be for the next influenza pandemic.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

I Believe in Zero CLABSIs – Central line-associated bloodstream infections – new website

Posted on January 28, 2011. Filed under: Infection Control |

I Believe in Zero CLABSIs – Central line-associated bloodstream infections – new website

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare (2010) – NHMRC

Posted on October 15, 2010. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare (2010) – NHMRC

“Synopsis of publication

There are around 200,000 healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) in Australian acute healthcare facilities each year. This makes HAIs the most common complication affecting patients in hospital. As well as causing unnecessary pain and suffering for patients and their families, these adverse events prolong hospital stays and are costly to the health system.

Understanding the modes of transmission of infectious organisms and knowing how and when to apply the basic principles of infection prevention and control is critical to the success of an infection control program. This responsibility applies to everybody working and visiting a healthcare facility, including administrators, staff, patients and carers.

Successful approaches for preventing and reducing harms arising from HAIs involve applying a risk-management framework to manage ‘human’ and ‘system’ factors associated with the transmission of infectious agents. This approach ensures that infectious agents, whether common (e.g. gastrointestinal viruses) or evolving (e.g. influenza or multi-resistant organisms [MROs]), can be managed effectively.

These guidelines provide recommendations that outline the critical aspects of infection prevention and control. The recommendations were developed using the best available evidence and consensus methods by the Infection Control Steering Committee. They have been prioritised as key areas to prevent and control infection in a healthcare facility. It is recognised that the level of risk may differ according to the different types of facility and therefore some recommendations should be justified by risk assessment. When implementing these recommendations all healthcare facilities need to consider the risk of transmission of infection and implement according to their specific setting and circumstances.”

Executive Summary (PDF, 1312KB) 

Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare (2010) (3882KB PDF) 

Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare (2010) – ebook

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Draft – Australian Infection Control Guidelines – 7 January 2010 – NH&MRC

Posted on January 12, 2010. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , , |

DRAFT – Australian Infection Control Guidelines – 7 January 2010 – NH&MRC
http://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines/consult/aicg.htm

“The NHMRC is keen to ensure that the Australian community has the best opportunity to participate in developing NHMRC reports.

NOTICE OF PROPOSED GUIDELINES
The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), in partnership with the Australian Commission for Safety and Quality in Healthcare (the Commission), has released for public comment the Australian Infection Control Guidelines: preventing and managing infection in health care (the draft Guidelines).

The draft Guidelines have been developed to assist a coordinated approach to the management of health care associated infection (HAI) in Australia by supporting the Commission’s other HAI priority program initiatives.

To facilitate this approach, the draft Guidelines are written from a care delivery perspective, focussing on safety and quality and using a risk management framework. This approach differs from the current Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA) 2004 Infection control guidelines for the prevention of transmission of infectious diseases in the health care setting which are disease and setting specific.”

…continues on the website

Closing Date
The closing date for submissions is 10 March 2010
Download
Draft Infection Control Guidelines (2.63MB PDF)
Attachments to the process report: (6.46 MB)
Systematic reviews
Drafting of recommendations and evidence statements
Preliminary feedback on previous drafts
Grading conversion systems

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Pandemic influenza: summary infection control guidance for ambulance services during an influenza pandemic – UK – 8 January 2010

Posted on January 12, 2010. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu | Tags: , |

Pandemic influenza: summary infection control guidance for ambulance services during an influenza pandemic – UK – 8 January 2010

Document type: Guidance
Author: Department of Health
Published date: 8 January 2010
Pages: 25

“The purpose of this document is to set out concise summary guidance for infection control for the ambulance services and it is intended for use during the pandemic. The guidance in this document is equally applicable to lay responders, who should adopt the same infection control and hygiene measures.

This guidance document includes sections on patient management, infection control precautions, use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and environmental infection control, as well as occupational health.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Pandemic (H1N1) influenza: a summary of guidance for infection control in healthcare settings – UK – 8 January 2010

Posted on January 12, 2010. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu | Tags: |

Pandemic (H1N1) influenza:  a summary of guidance for infection control in healthcare settings  – 8 January 2010

Document type: Guidance
Author: Department of Health and Health Protection Agency
Published date: 8 January 2010
Pages: 32

Supersedes/replaces: Pandemic influenza: guidance for infection control in hospitals and primary care settings

“This document is an updated version of Pandemic flu: A summary of guidance for infection control in health care settings issued in September 2007. It is specific to the current pandemic influenza virus, pandemic (H1N1), and thus represents current guidance.

This document is based on the currently available virological and epidemiological knowledge about pandemic (H1N1) influenza and includes new or updated information regarding:

transmission characteristics of pandemic (H1N1) influenza aerosol-generating procedures occupational health: deployment of staff at high risk of complications from influenza setting-specific guidance for mortuaries and dental surgeries.The guidance document has been written for the NHS, but the infection control principles apply to other settings delivering healthcare.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 Code of Practice for health and adult social care on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance – UK – 16 December 2009

Posted on December 29, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

The Health and Social Care Act 2008 Code of Practice for health and adult social care on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance – UK – 16 December 2009

“The Code of Practice and related guidance will help providers of health and adult social care to plan and implement how they prevent and control infections. It sets out criteria that the Care Quality Commission will use to assess compliance with the registration requirement for cleanliness and infection control.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Working together to prevent and control infections – A study of the arrangements for infection prevention and control between hospitals and care homes – Care Quality Commission (UK) – September 2009

Posted on December 14, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

Working together to prevent and control infections – A study of the arrangements for infection prevention and control between hospitals and care homes – Care Quality Commission (UK) – September 2009

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Canadian Institute for Health Information, In Focus: A National Look at Sepsis – 10 December 2009

Posted on December 11, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

Canadian Institute for Health Information, In Focus: A National Look at Sepsis
(Ottawa, Ont.: CIHI, 2009).   Canadian Institute for Health Information
ISBN 978-1-55465-658-5 (PDF)

Canadian Institute for Health Information 2009 Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio (HSMR) Public Release

“December 10—A new study shows that in 2008–2009 more than 9,300 patients died of sepsis, a condition resulting from the body’s response to severe infection, in Canadian hospitals outside Quebec.” …continues on the website

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Enforcement Procedures for High to Very High Occupational Exposure Risk to 2009 H1N1 Influenza – US – 20 November 2009

Posted on November 24, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases, Influenza A(H1N1) / Swine Flu, Occupational Hlth Safety | Tags: |

Enforcement Procedures for High to Very High Occupational Exposure Risk to 2009 H1N1 Influenza – US Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration – OSHA Instruction – Directive CPL-02-02-075 – 20 November 2009

“This Instruction establishes agency enforcement policies and provides instructions to ensure uniform procedures when conducting inspections to minimize high to very high occupational exposure risk to the virus identified as 2009 H1N1 influenza of workers whose occupational activities involve contact with patients or contaminated material in a healthcare or clinical laboratory setting.”

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Clean Care is Safer Care – The First Global Patient Safety Challenge – WHO Hand Hygiene Guidelines May 2009

Posted on July 28, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Patient Safety | Tags: , |

Clean Care is Safer Care – The First Global Patient Safety Challenge – WHO Hand Hygiene Guidelines May 2009

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Response to Independent Review of evidence regarding selection of techniques for the suppression of Legionella in water supplies of hospitals and other healthcare premises – UK – 16 July 2009

Posted on July 17, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: |

Response to Independent Review of evidence regarding selection of techniques for the suppression of Legionella in water supplies of hospitals and other healthcare premises

Last modified date:      16 July 2009

The Department commissioned an Independent review of evidence in relation to legionella and other water borne infections in January 2009.

The Chair of the review group was Dr Peter Wilson MA MD FRCP FRCP Path, an eminent expert in this field and consultant microbiologist at University College London Hospitals. Membership of this group was entirely at the discretion of the Chair, without influence from DH or other parties.

The Department received Dr Wilson’s report of the Independent review of evidence on 25 March 2009.

The Department subsequently formed a Response Panel to review Dr Wilson’s report. The Response Panel broadly agrees with the key points and recommendations, but with a number of exceptions. This was due largely in part to the panel being unable to establish a clear link between the evidence reviewed and the recommendations made.

Detailed responses to each of the summary points and recommendations are given in the Response to the Independent Review.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Lessons learned from NHS QIS visits to NHS Orkney, NHS Highland and NHS Grampian following C.difficile incidents – June 2009

Posted on July 1, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: , |

Lessons learned from NHS QIS visits to NHS Orkney, NHS Highland and NHS Grampian following C.difficile incidents

About these reports

“Each NHS board report contains specific findings. Together they identify:

* a need for a fresh look at implementing healthcare associated infection (HAI) guidance
* a need for greater clarity within Health Boards on internal working systems and practices on HAI prevention
* a need within Health Boards for improved monitoring systems, antibiotic prescribing, and collaborative working across Scotland in relation to HAI. ”

About the visits

“We have recently undertaken ‘shared learning’ visits to three NHS boards following Clostridium difficile (C.difficile) outbreaks.

These visits were carried out at the request of the Scottish Government Health Department (SGHD).  Below is a link to the NHS Board specific reports from each of these visits along with an overview report which draws together the key themes and learning points from the visits along with potential solutions for addressing the challenges we face.”

* Lessons Learned Overview Report (PDF, 205K)

* NHS Orkney – Clinical Governance Diagnostic Review (PDF, 231K)

* NHS Grampian – Infection Prevention and Control: Improving through Learning (PDF, 226K)

* NHS Highland – Infection Prevention and Control: Improving through Learning (PDF, 207K)

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Tackling healthcare associated infections through effective policy action – British Medical Association – June 2009

Posted on June 19, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

Tackling healthcare associated infections through effective policy action – British Medical Association – June 2009

The aim of this report is to examine the evidence base for the range of infection control policies, and identify areas for action in tackling the problem. It builds on the 2006 BMA Board of Science publication ‘Healthcare associated infections – a guide for healthcare professionals’ which sets out the responsibilities healthcare professionals have in managing and reducing the incidence of HCAIs. The report is intended for policy makers with strategic or operational responsibility for public health in the UK, and will be of interest to healthcare professionals and patients.

BMA – publications

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

A new Objective for MRSA: National Quality Board stakeholder engagement (UK) – 11 Jun 2009

Posted on June 19, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control |

A new Objective for MRSA: National Quality Board stakeholder engagement (UK) – 11 Jun 2009

This stakeholder engagement activity on a new MRSA Objective is being overseen by the National Quality Board to continue to drive improvements in the NHS. The engagement document sets out proposals for an MRSA Objective and how it would apply to different organisations. The closing date for comments is 24 July 2009.

Department of Health – publications

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Reducing healthcare associated infections in hospitals in England – National Audit Office – 12 June 2009

Posted on June 19, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

Reducing healthcare associated infections in hospitals in England – National Audit Office – 12 June 2009

This report examines the extent and impact of healthcare associated infections; the effectiveness, sustainability and cost of the Department of Health’s approach; and the effectiveness of action taken in hospitals to prevent and control infections. It also looks at the barriers to improvement and recommends the steps that the NHS should take to sustain and make further progress.
68p.

National Audit Office – publications

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Fighting MRSA and C.difficile – development underway for a hand-held detection system – 18 May 2009

Posted on May 19, 2009. Filed under: Health Technology Assessment, Infection Control, Pathology |

Fighting MRSA and C.difficile

info copied from Response Source

* Submitted by: Cambridge Design Partnership
* Monday, 18 May 2009

“Universal Sensors, Nottingham Trent University and Cambridge Design Partnership to help in the fight against the hospital superbugs, C.difficile and MRSA.

Universal Sensors Ltd (Cambridge, UK), Nottingham Trent University (Nottingham, UK) and Cambridge Design Partnership (Cambridge, UK) have entered into a strategic alliance to develop a hand-held system to detect the hospital superbugs, C.difficile and MRSA. The collaboration is funded through the new Small Business Research Initiative (SBRI), in contracts that were awarded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) under its Invention for Innovation (i4i) Programme, the results of which were announced on 15th May 2009.

The control of Health Care Associated Infections (HAIs) and improving the cleanliness of hospitals are primary objectives for the UK’s National Health Service (NHS), but reducing the incidence of HAIs from our hospitals has been a challenge. In 2008, the NHS spent £53 million undertaking a comprehensive “deep clean” of every hospital in the UK and many NHS Trusts are now reporting a decrease in the incidence of both C.difficile and MRSA as a result of this and other initiatives implemented by dedicated Infection Control teams.” … continues on the website

Universal Sensors Ltd

Nottingham Trent University

Cambridge Design Partnership

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Measuring Hand Hygiene Adherence: Overcoming the Challenges US Joint Commission 14 April 2009

Posted on May 18, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

Measuring Hand Hygiene Adherence: Overcoming the Challenges 14 April 2009

“The Joint Commission is releasing ‘Measuring Hand Hygiene Adherence:  Overcoming the Challenges’, to help health care organizations target their efforts in measuring hand hygiene performance. The monograph is designed to address “everything you ever wanted to know about hand hygiene measurement but were afraid to ask.” The aim of the monograph is to broaden understanding of the issues and provide practical solutions for strengthening measurement and improvement activities.

The monogragh is the result of a two-year collaboration with major infection control leadership organizations in the United States and abroad. In addition to The Joint Commission, the participating organizations include:

  • Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • The Institute for Healthcare Improvement
  • The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases
  • The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America
  • The World Health Organization “
Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Guidance for Control of Infections with Carbapenem-Resistant or Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Acute Care Facilities CDC 20 March 2009

Posted on April 17, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Guidance for Control of Infections with Carbapenem-Resistant or Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Acute Care Facilities
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Guidance for Control of Infections with Carbapenem-Resistant or Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Acute Care Facilities. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [Serial online] 2009 Mar 20;58(10):256-260.

Infection with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae is emerging as an important challenge in health care settings. This threatens to become a problem akin to MRSA. Institutions must be alert for this and other very resistant organisms (ESBL, CTX producing gram negatives, etc.) and not limit foci to C. difficile and MRSA.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

The Health and Social Care Act 2008: Code of Practice for the NHS on the prevention and control of healthcare associated infections and related guidance

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control | Tags: , |

The Code, which comes into force on 1 April 2009, sets out how the Care Quality Commission will assess compliance with the requirements set out in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and provides guidance on how providers can meet the registration requirements relating to healthcare associated infections.  The January 2008 version of the Code will remain in force until 1 April 2009.

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Clostridium difficile infection: how to deal with the problem [UK DoH report]

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Infection Control, Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Clostridium difficile infection: how to deal with the problem

This guidance outlines newer evidence and approaches to delivering good infection control and environmental hygiene and updates the 1994 DH/PHLS guidance(Department of Health – publications)   15 January 2009

See also the June 2009 report from NHS Health Quality in Scotland looking at the Lessons learned from NHS QIS visits to NHS Orkney, NHS Highland and NHS Grampian following C.difficile incidents

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Institute for Healthcare Improvement – Improvement Map (US)

Posted on April 7, 2009. Filed under: Clin Governance / Risk Mgmt / Quality, Health Systems Improvement, Infection Control, Patient Safety, Surgery | Tags: |

The Improvement Map

The IHI Improvement Map is an initiative to help hospitals make sense of countless requirements and focus on high-leverage changes to transform care.  For details, download the Improvement Map overview.

The Improvement Map will cover the entire landscape of outstanding hospital care:

and now expanding the agenda with three new interventions:

Read Full Post | Make a Comment ( None so far )

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...