Health Libnship

Key concepts in consumer and community engagement: a scoping meta-review – BMC Health Services Research – 13 June 2014

Posted on June 24, 2014. Filed under: Health Libnship, Patient Participation |

Key concepts in consumer and community engagement: a scoping meta-review – BMC Health Services Research – 13 June 2014

doi:10.1186/1472-6963-14-250

“Abstract (provisional)

Background
Although consumer and community engagement (CCE) in health care is receiving increasing attention, research and practice in this area is hampered by the variability of concepts and terminology commonly employed. This scoping meta-review aims to identify key CCE concepts and examine terminology used to describe them.

Methods
In a scoping meta-review, an extensive list of 47 phrases and 11 Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) was used to undertake a comprehensive and systematic search in PubMed Central, Embase, EBM reviews, CINAHL, APAPsycNET, and Scopus.

Results
59 systematic reviews met the selection criteria and were included in the final analysis. The analysis identified nine different concepts related to CCE: shared decision-making, self-management, CCE in health care systems, community-based health promotion, providing access to health care, rehabilitation, participation in research, collaboration in research design and conduct, and peer support. The identified concepts differ from each other in many aspects including the aim of the activity, the role of consumers and the type of professionals’ involvement. Each concept was described by a range of terms, with some terms shared by different concepts. In addition, two overlapping concepts of patient-centeredness and patient empowerment were recognised.

Conclusions
This study describes CCE-related key concepts and provides new insight into their relationship with different CCE-related terms. Identification of key CCE-related concepts and terms will be useful to focus future studies and initiatives and enhance production of CCE-related evidence.”

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Matching form to function: Designing organizational models to support knowledge brokering in European health systems – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

Posted on January 23, 2014. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Libnship, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

Matching form to function: Designing organizational models to support knowledge brokering in European health systems – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

John N. Lavis, Nasreen Jessani, Govin Permanand, Cristina Catallo, Amy Zierler, BriDGE Study Team

Extract from the key messages

“Credible, competent knowledge brokers in European health systems will ideally organize themselves so as to: inform policy-making using the best available health systems information; inform the production, packaging and sharing of health systems information based on current and emerging policy-making priorities; and employ (and continuously improve) information-packaging and interactive knowledge-sharing mechanisms that are based on a solid understanding of the policy-making context.
The BriDGE criteria can be used to assess an existing or planned organizational model.”

… continues

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How can knowledge brokering be advanced in a country’s health system? – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

Posted on January 16, 2014. Filed under: Evidence Based Practice, Health Libnship, Knowledge Translation | Tags: |

How can knowledge brokering be advanced in a country’s health system? – European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies – 2013

Authors
John N. Lavis, McMaster University, Canada and Harvard School of Public Health, USA
Govin Permanand, Evidence and Information for Policy, WHO Regional Office for Europe, Denmark
Cristina Catallo, School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Canada and McMaster University, Canada
BRIDGE Study Team, which includes Josep Figueras, Mark Leys, David McDaid, Gabriele Pastorino and John-Arne Røttingen

“What’s the problem?
• The overarching problem is that there is a lack of attention given to ‘what to do next’ to advance knowledge brokering in many European countries’
health systems. This problem can be understood by considering four sets of interrelated issues within any given country’s health system:
– untapped potential for health systems information to inform policy-making;
– missed opportunities to take stock of the current state of knowledge brokering and to prioritize enhancements to information-packaging mechanisms, enrichments to interactive knowledge-sharing mechanisms, and adaptations to organizational models that support knowledge brokering;
– lack of alignment of support for knowledge brokering, including incentives and requirements for using promising knowledge-brokering mechanisms and models; and
– limited reach of existing efforts to advance knowledge brokering.”

… continues

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Starting the Conversation: University-wide Research Data Management Policy – An OCLC Research Report – December 2013

Posted on December 24, 2013. Filed under: Health Libnship, Research |

Starting the Conversation: University-wide Research Data Management Policy – An OCLC Research Report – December 2013

“Starting the Conversation: University-wide Research Data Management Policy is a call for action that summarizes the benefits of systemic data management planning and identifies the stakeholders and their concerns. It also suggests that the library director proactively initiate a conversation among these stakeholders to get buy-in for a high-level, responsible data planning and management policy that is proactive, rather than reactive.”

 

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New report released tracking usage pattern of academic journal articles – American Association of American Publishers – 18 December 2013

Posted on December 19, 2013. Filed under: Health Libnship, Research | Tags: , |

New report released tracking usage pattern of academic journal articles – American Association of American Publishers – 18 December 2013

Journal Usage Half-Life
By Phil Davis, Ph.D.

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Knowledge strategy: Harnessing the power of information to improve the public’s health – Public Health England – October 2013

Posted on October 22, 2013. Filed under: Health Libnship, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion, Research | Tags: |

Knowledge strategy: Harnessing the power of information to improve the public’s health – Public Health England – October 2013

Extract from the Executive Summary

“This document describes the strategic approach that the public health system will take around information and knowledge in order to improve and protect public health and reduce inequalities. It is a response from the whole public health system, under the leadership of PHE, to the Department of Health information strategy, The Power of Information: Putting all of us in control of the health and care information we need.

This strategy describes how PHE will meet the knowledge and information requirements of public health practitioners across the public health system. For this
reason, the primary audience for the strategy is knowledge and intelligence professionals across all directorates of PHE. This strategy exists because of a desire to improve the quality of knowledge in the whole public health system. Therefore the other key recipients of this document are the public health practitioners in local authorities who use public health knowledge on a day-to-day basis. These users, as well as all other stakeholders, are welcomed to shape the implementation of this strategy.

Taking the lead from The Power of Information, this strategy does not propose specific system implementations or set down detailed mechanisms for delivery. It provides a framework to support changes across the public health system, putting the user of knowledge at the centre and promoting flexibility and innovation within an environment that promotes efficiency.

The strategy is focused around the eight priorities for public health knowledge identified by PHE. It addresses the entire information lifecycle from understanding the requirements of those who are using public health knowledge through to what technologies PHE will use to disseminate knowledge.”

… continues on the site

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Making a difference. Stories from the field: how access to scientific literature is improving the livelihoods of communities around the world – research4life – January 2012

Posted on January 23, 2012. Filed under: Health Libnship, Knowledge Translation, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion, Research | Tags: |

Making a difference. Stories from the field: how access to scientific literature is improving the livelihoods of communities around the world – research4life – January 2012

“To celebrate Research4Life’s 10th anniversary in 2011, we launched a user experience competition. We asked users to share with us how HINARI, AGORA or OARE has improved their work, life and community. In total we received some 60 entries from countries in all five continents. This impressive array of inspiring testimonies revealed a wealth of positive impacts brought about by Research4Life. This book celebrates the stories behind some of these competition entries.

This illuminating series of case studies provides insights into how access to the results of peer-reviewed research from Research4Life publisher partners is benefiting the health, well-being, and economic and social development of communities in the developing world, as well as contributing to greater environmental health and awareness.”

… continues on the site

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HIFA2015 Evaluation Report – Health Information for All by 2015 – 25 October 2011

Posted on October 26, 2011. Filed under: Health Informatics, Health Libnship | Tags: |

HIFA2015 Evaluation Report – Health Information for All by 2015 – 25 October 2011

In 2011, HIFA2015 underwent a major external evaluation, funded by the Rockefeller Foundation.

Press Release
Evaluation recommends investment in Healthcare Information For All by 2015 to meet the information needs of healthcare providers in developing countries

“London, UK,  – Healthcare Information For All by 2015 1 (HIFA2015) is pleased to announce the publication of the report Evaluation of HIFA2015 2 funded by the Rockefeller Foundation through its Transforming Health Systems Initiative.

The report’s main conclusion is that “HIFA2015 achieves an extraordinary level of activity on minimal resources from which many people around the world benefit. However, its ultimate success will depend on external funders providing additional funding”. This echoes calls in the BMJ earlier this year for a major funder to support HIFA2015 3.

Dr Najeeb Al-Shorbaji, Director of Knowledge Management and Sharing at WHO in Geneva, responded to the report by commenting: “HIFA2015 is already making a difference globally by bringing information providers and users together on an equal footing and promoting equitable and sustainable access to health information as a right. The report is right to highlight the power of knowledge networks and the need for funding for HIFA2015, especially as we work towards the Millennium Development Goals. These require targeted funding of effective networking initiatives such as HIFA2015 to enable it to continue to function as a change agent”.”

… continues on the site

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International Coalition of Library Consortia (ICOLC) Statement on the Global Economic Crisis and Its Impact on Consortial Licenses January 19, 2009

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Health Libnship |

“Written on behalf of the many library consortia across the world that participate in the ICOLC, this statement has two purposes.  It is intended to help publishers and other content providers from whom we license electronic information resources (hereafter simply referred to as publishers) understand better how the current unique financial crisis affects the worldwide information community.  Its second purpose is to suggest a range of approaches that we believe are in the mutual best interest of libraries and the providers of information services.” … continues on the website

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Institutional Repository on a Shoestring

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Health Libnship |

D-Lib Magazine
January/February 2009
Volume 15 Number 1/2
ISSN 1082-9873
Institutional Repository on a Shoestring

“Humboldt State University (HSU), with 7,800 students (fall 2008), is one of the smaller campuses in the 23-member California State University (CSU) system. Our institutional repository, Humboldt Digital Scholar1 (HDS), originated as a pilot project during the Library’s August 2004 planning meeting and became a permanent Library service in April 2006. The repository functions “on a shoestring,” unfunded and reliant on contributions of time from librarians and library staff for its ongoing maintenance and development.

In this article, the authors, three members of the HDS Steering Committee, describe the process of setting up and managing a digital repository: hardware and software selection; customizations; gaining campus support; developing collections; accepting submissions; and planning for the future, including participation in a system-wide effort to create a shared repository for the CSU.”

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A Policy Checklist for Enabling Persistence of Identifiers

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Health Libnship |

D-Lib Magazine,  January/February 2009,   Volume 15 Number 1/2
ISSN 1082-9873
A Policy Checklist for Enabling Persistence of Identifiers

Nick Nicholas,  Nigel Ward, Kerry Blinco

Abstract

One of the main tasks of the Persistent Identifier Linking Infrastructure (PILIN) project on persistent identifiers was to establish a policy framework for managing identifiers and identifier providers. A major finding from the project was that policy is far more important in guaranteeing persistence of identifiers than technology. Key policy questions for guaranteeing identifier persistence include: what entities should be assigned persistent identifiers, how should those identifiers be exposed to services, and what guarantees does the provider make on how long various facets of the identifiers will persist.

To make an informed decision about what to identify, information modelling of the domain is critical. Identifier managers need to know what can be identified discretely (including not only concrete artefacts like files, but also abstractions such as works, versions, presentations, and aggregations); and for which of those objects it is a priority for users and managers to keep track. Without working out what actually needs to be identified, the commitment to keep identifiers persistent becomes meaningless.

To make sure persistent identifiers meet these requirements, the PILIN project has formulated a six-point checklist for integrating identifiers into information management, which we present here.

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