Complementary & Altern Care

End of the road for homeopathy? – Croakey – 9 April 2014

Posted on April 9, 2014. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Evidence Based Practice | Tags: |

End of the road for homeopathy? – Croakey – 9 April 2014

A new report from the NHMRC regarding the evidence base for homeopathy raises questions regarding the funding of a range of homeopathic treatments. Many thanks to Lorretta Marron, CEO, Friends of Science in Medicine for this overview.

Will homeopathy finally disappear into history? The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) “concludes that the assessment of the evidence from research in humans does not show that homeopathy is effective for treating the range of health conditions considered”. It’s now official: according to Australia’s peak medical research body, homeopathy doesn’t work!”

… continues on the site

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TGA reforms: a blueprint for TGA’s future – 8 December 2011

Posted on December 8, 2011. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Health Technology Assessment, Pharmacy | Tags: |

TGA reforms: a blueprint for TGA’s future – 8 December 2011

“The Australian Government has released its response to several major reviews of therapeutic goods regulation that have been undertaken over the past 18 months.

These reviews include:

•the review to improve the transparency of the Therapeutic Goods Administration
•public consultations on the regulatory framework for advertising therapeutic goods
•the Auditor-General’s report on Therapeutic Goods Regulation: Complementary Medicines
•an informal working group examining the regulation of complementary medicines and reasons for low compliance rates
•public consultations on the medical devices regulatory framework
•the Working Group on Promotion of Therapeutic Products
•the Health Technology Assessment Review.

The Government’s response takes into account submissions made by stakeholders, and draws this work together into a comprehensive package of reforms that will be progressed in stages.

The reforms will enhance the regulatory framework, ensuring that it remains adaptable to new scientific developments and emerging community expectations.

They will also improve the Australian community’s understanding of the TGA’s regulatory processes and decisions and enhance public trust in the safety and quality of therapeutic goods.”

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Therapeutic Goods Regulation: Complementary Medicines – Australian National Audit Office – 30 August 2011

Posted on August 31, 2011. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Pharmacy |

Therapeutic Goods Regulation: Complementary Medicines – Australian National Audit Office – 30 August 2011

The Auditor-General Audit Report No.3 2011–12

ISSN 1036–7632
ISBN 0 642 81207 1

“The objective of this audit is to examine the effectiveness of the TGA’s administration of complementary  medicines regulation in Australia. The primary focus is on listed complementary medicines, which comprise about
98 per cent of these medicines.”

ABC News report on the publication

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NIH launches Web resource on complementary and alternative medicine – 26 April 2011

Posted on April 29, 2011. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Evidence Based Practice | Tags: |

NIH launches Web resource on complementary and alternative medicine – 26 April 2011

“Evidence-based information for health care providers

A new online resource, designed to give health care providers easy access to evidence-based information on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), was unveiled today by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) of the National Institutes of Health.

With this new resource, providers will have the tools necessary to learn about the various CAM practices and products and be better able to discuss the safety and effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine with their patients.” 

… continues on the site

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Analysis report on the 2009 consultation on the statutory regulation of practitioners of acupuncture, herbal medicine, traditional Chinese medicine and other traditional medicine systems practised in the UK – 16 February 2011

Posted on February 21, 2011. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Workforce | Tags: |

Analysis report on the 2009 consultation on the statutory regulation of practitioners of acupuncture, herbal medicine, traditional Chinese medicine and other traditional medicine systems practised in the UK – 16 February 2011

“This document is a factual analysis of the responses received to the consultation on whether, and if so how, to regulate practutioners of acupuncture, herbal medicine and traditional Chinese medicine practitioners, held in 2009.”

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Evidence Check 2: Homeopathy – House of Commons, Science and Technology Committee – 22 February 2010

Posted on February 24, 2010. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care | Tags: |

Evidence Check 2: Homeopathy – House of Commons, Science and Technology Committee

Published on 22 February 2010
by authority of the House of Commons
London: The Stationery Office Limited

“Evidence Check inquiries

1. Since the Science and Technology Committee was reformed in October 2009, we have been running a novel programme of work that we have called “Evidence Check”. The purpose of Evidence Check is to examine how the Government uses evidence to formulate and review its policies. We have focussed on narrow policy areas and asked the Government to answer two questions: (1) what is the policy? and (2) on what evidence is the policy based? In December 2009 we published our first Evidence Check on Early Literacy Interventions.

2. This is the second Evidence Check report. It examines the Government’s policies on the provision of homeopathy through the National Health Service (NHS) and the licensing of homeopathic products by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We selected this topic following the Government’s responses in September 2009 to questions we asked about the evidence base underpinning several different policies. The Government’s response on homeopathy indicated that scientific evidence was not used to formulate the licensing regime operated by the MHRA.2 We were surprised by this response and decided to broaden the inquiry to include consideration of the evidence base underpinning the Government’s policy regarding the funding of homeopathy on the NHS.”

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Assessing complementary practice: building consensus on appropriate research methods – King’s Fund – August 2009

Posted on August 24, 2009. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care | Tags: |

Assessing complementary practice: building consensus on appropriate research methods

Despite the increasing popularity and use of complementary practice, it is difficult to assess its effectiveness. Lack of research – and lack of agreement on research methods – has led to criticism from branches of conventional medicine. The King’s Fund set up an advisory group, chaired by Professor Dame Carol Black, to consider how to develop and apply a robust evidence base for complementary practice. The group drew on the experience of a wide range of academics, researchers, practitioners and funders and have published this report on their findings.

The King’s Fund – publications

ISBN: 978 1 85717 5790

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AHRQ Releases New Evidence Report on Back Pain – February 2009

Posted on April 8, 2009. Filed under: Complementary & Altern Care, Orthopaedics, Physiotherapy | Tags: |

US Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality – Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Back Pain Utilization, was conducted by AHRQ’s McMaster University Evidence-based Practice Center and funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Structured Abstract

Objectives: This systematic review was undertaken to evaluate which complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are being used for persons with back pain in the United States.
Data Sources: MEDLINE®, EMBASE®, CINAHL® and Cochrane Central® and a variety of CAM specific databases were searched from 1990 to November 2007. A grey literature search was also undertaken, particularly for clinical practice guidelines (CPG) related to CAM.
Review Methods: Standard systematic review methodology was employed. Eligibility criteria included English studies of adults with back pain, and a predefined list of CAM therapies.
Results: A total of 103 publications were evaluated; of these 29 did not present CAM therapy use stratified for back pain. There were a total of 65 utilization studies, 43 of which were American. Four publications evaluated the concurrent use of four or more CAM therapies and these suggest that chiropractic/manipulation is the most frequently used modality followed by massage and acupuncture. A limited number of publications evaluated utilization rates within multiple regions of the back and show that CAM was used least for treating the thoracic spine and most for the low back. However, rates of use of massage were similar for neck and lower back regions. Concurrent use of different CAM or conventional therapies was not well reported.
From 11 eligible CPG, only one (for electro-acupuncture) provided recommendations for frequency of use for low back pain of all acuity levels.
Eighteen cost publications were reviewed and all but one publication (cost-effectiveness) were cost identification studies. There is limited information on the impact of insurance coverage on costs and utilization specific to back pain.
Conclusions: There are few studies evaluating the relative utilization of various CAM therapies for back pain. For those studies evaluating utilization of individual CAM therapies, the specific characteristics of the therapy, the providers, and the clinical presentation of the back pain patients were not adequately detailed; nor was the overlap with other CAM or conventional treatments.

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