Raising Concerns at Work: Whistleblowing Guidance for Workers and Employers in Health and Social Care – April 2014

Posted on April 8, 2014. Filed under: Workforce | Tags: |

Raising Concerns at Work: Whistleblowing Guidance for Workers and Employers in Health and Social Care – April 2014

“The Whistleblowing Helpline’s new publication, “Raising Concerns at Work: Whistleblowing Guidance for Workers and Employers in Health and Social Care” is now available to download. Key sections in the Guidance include:

The importance of whistleblowing as an early warning system of problems, which research shows is often ignored
An outline of the legislation – the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998
A flowchart of the whistleblowing process (on page 14)
Top tips for workers who wish to raise concerns, and sources of advice and support for them
Top tips for operational managers to respond positively when staff raise concerns
At corporate level, the Guidance sets national standards for whistleblowing policies for employers, together with a summary of their responsibilities
Case studies of good practice, Frequently Asked Questions, and further information and links.

You can download the entire document here or request a hard copy of the document through our Contact Us page.

The Guidance has special sections aimed at workers and managers, and you can download those here:

Top Tips for Workers
Top Tips for Managers
Employer Guidance
Frequently Asked Questions
Flowchart of Whistleblowing Process”

News release

“Raising concerns about poor practice, as part of people’s day-to day work, should be the norm. That’s the message in new guidance that’s been launched this week, providing support for health and social care staff and managers over whistleblowing.

There are a number of key recommendations, to help make whistleblowing an important part of improving the quality of service user support and patient safety. From an employer’s viewpoint, whistleblowing can be an opportunity to stop poor practice at an early stage, before it becomes normalised. For the worker, the freedom to raise concerns without fear means that they can go ahead and ‘do the right thing’.”

… continues on the site

 

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