The Diseconomies of Queue Pooling: An Empirical Investigation of Emergency Department Length of Stay – Harvard Business School – 31 January 2014

Posted on February 3, 2014. Filed under: Emergency Medicine, Health Systems Improvement |

The Diseconomies of Queue Pooling: An Empirical Investigation of Emergency Department Length of Stay – Harvard Business School – 31 January 2014

Executive summary”

“Improving efficiency and customer experience are key objectives for managers of service organizations including hospitals. In this paper, the authors investigate queue management, a key operational decision, in the setting of a hospital emergency department. Specifically, they explore the impact on throughput time depending on whether an emergency department uses a pooled queuing system (in which a physician is assigned to a patient once the patient is placed in an emergency department bed) or a dedicated queuing system (in which physicians are assigned to specific patients at the point of triage). The authors measured throughput time based on individual patients’ length of stay in the emergency department, starting with arrival to the emergency department and ending with a bed request for admission to the hospital or the discharge of a patient to home or to an outside facility. The findings show that, on average, the use of a dedicated queuing system decreased patients’ lengths of stay by 10 percent. This represented a 32-minute reduction in length of stay—a meaningful time-savings for the emergency department and patients alike. The authors argue that physicians in the dedicated queuing system had both the incentive and ability to make sure their patients’ care progressed efficiently, so that patients in the waiting room could be treated sooner than they otherwise would have. Key concepts include:”

… continues on the site

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