Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 1 November 2012

Posted on November 2, 2012. Filed under: Alcohol & Drug Dep., Oncology | Tags: , , |

Reducing Tobacco-Related Cancer Incidence and Mortality – Workshop Summary – Institute of Medicine – 1 November 2012

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“Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, causing more than 440,000 deaths and resulting in $193 billion in health-related economic losses every year. In addition to causing cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, tobacco use is linked to the development of 18 different types of cancer and accounts for at least 30 percent of all cancer deaths and 80 percent of lung cancer deaths. Despite the widespread agreement on the dangers of tobacco use and considerable success in reducing the smoking rate by half since the first U.S. Surgeon General’s report on smoking in 1964, progress in reducing tobacco use has slowed in recent years. Today, nearly 19 percent of U.S. adults smoke, many of whom began smoking as adolescents or young adults. In addition, the use of new tobacco and nicotine products is on the rise, with unclear health consequences.

Recognizing that progress in combating cancer will not be fully achieved without addressing the tobacco problem, the IOM’s National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop June 11-12, 2012. The workshop examined current challenges in tobacco control and explored potential policy, outreach, and treatment strategies that could overcome these challenges and reduce tobacco-related cancer incidence and death. This document summarizes the workshop.”

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