Health Indicators 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 24 May 2012

Posted on May 28, 2012. Filed under: Health Status, Preventive Healthcare, Public Hlth & Hlth Promotion | Tags: , |

Health Indicators 2012 – Canadian Institute for Health Information – 24 May 2012

“The rate of deaths that could potentially be avoided through timely and effective health care and disease prevention dropped from 373 per 100,000 Canadians in 1979 to 185 per 100,000 Canadians in 2008. Health Indicators 2012, the most recent edition of the report produced annually by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) and Statistics Canada, includes updates on more than 40 measures for Canadian regions, including a suite of new avoidable mortality indicators.

“When we look into pan-Canadian results for avoidable deaths,” says Jeremy Veillard, Vice President, Research and Analysis, CIHI, “we can determine the respective impact of prevention efforts and of health care improvements.”

The report reveals that the rate of deaths that could be avoided by preventing disease from developing or an injury from occurring has decreased by 47% over a 30-year period. The rate for Canadians went from 225 per 100,000 in 1979 to 119 per 100,000 in 2008.

Meanwhile, deaths that could have been avoided through timely and effective health care intervention were reduced by 56%. This rate went from 149 per 100,000 Canadians in 1979 to 66 per 100,000 in 2008.”

… continues

Health Indicators 2012 is the 13th in a series of annual reports containing the most recently available health indicators data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Statistics Canada. In addition to presenting the most recent indicator results, this year’s report introduces a suite of new acute-care readmission indicators, as well as three new indicators focusing on avoidable mortality. An in depth analysis of Avoidable mortality indicators is presented in the In-Focus section of the report.”

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