Fungal Diseases: An Emerging Threat To Human, Animal, and Plant Health – Institute of Medicine Workshop Summary – Released 9 September 2011

Posted on September 12, 2011. Filed under: Infectious Diseases | Tags: |

Fungal Diseases: An Emerging Threat To Human, Animal, and Plant Health – Institute of Medicine Workshop Summary – Released 9 September 2011
Full text on National Academies Press 

“Fungal organisms are indispensible members of virtually all ecosystems and the “invisible” shapers of the world around us. They comprise one of the most diverse kingdoms in the Tree of Life, yet fewer than 10 percent of fungal organisms have been formally classified. Fungal diseases have contributed to death and disability in humans, triggered global wildlife extinctions and population declines, devastated agricultural crops, and altered forest ecosystem dynamics. Despite the extensive influence of fungi on health and economic well-being, the threats posed by emerging fungal pathogens to life on Earth are often underappreciated and poorly understood.

On December 14 and 15, 2010, the IOM’s Forum on Microbial Threats hosted a public workshop to explore the scientific and policy dimensions associated with the causes and consequences of emerging fungal diseases. Participants discussed factors influencing the emergence, establishment, and spread of fungal pathogens; the effects of these diseases on human and animal health, agriculture, and biodiversity; and opportunities to improve surveillance, detection, and response strategies for these diseases.”

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