Outcomes of Genetic Testing in Adults with a History of Venous Thromboembolism. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment – AHRQ – June 2009

Posted on June 25, 2009. Filed under: Cardiol / Cardiothor Surg, Genomics | Tags: , |

AHRQ = US Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality

Segal JB, Brotman DJ, Emadi A, Necochea AJ, Samal L, Wilson LM, Crim MT, Bass EB.
Outcomes of Genetic Testing in Adults with a History of Venous Thromboembolism. Evidence Report/Technology Assessment No. 180. (Prepared by Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center under contract no. HHSA 290-2007-10061-I). AHRQ Publication No. 09-E011. Rockville, MD. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.Value of Genetic Testing for Preventing Blood Clots Unproven

AHRQ released a new evidence report that found insufficient evidence to conclude that genetic testing for two gene mutations in adults with a history of blood clots helps to prevent a condition known as deep-vein thrombosis or to improve other clinical outcomes.  The report, a summary of which will be published in the June 17 issue of JAMA, also failed to find any benefit from genetic testing of family members of patients who have at least one of the two mutations — known as Factor V Leiden (FVL) and prothrombin G20210A — as well as a history of deep-vein thrombosis.   The evidence report was requested and supported by CDC’s Office of Public Health Genomics (OPHG).  The Evaluation of Geno mic Applications in Practice and Prevention Working Group, established by OPHG in 2005, will use this evidence report and other evidence to make recommendations on the validity and utility of genetic tests for FVL and prothrombin G20210A. This report, titled Outcomes of Genetic Testing in Adults with a History of Venous Thromboembolism, was conducted by AHRQ’s Johns Hopkins Evidence-based Practice Center in Baltimore.

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