The health workforce in Australia and factors influencing current shortages – Australian National Health Workforce Taskforce – April 2009 report

Posted on May 11, 2009. Filed under: Workforce | Tags: , |

The health workforce in Australia and factors influencing current shortages (pdf, 677k)

“It is generally accepted that Australia will continue to experience increasing demand for health care workers and at a rate that will challenge Australia’s training and service delivery systems’ without significant change to it’s approach to workforce development. The underlying health service demand drivers include; population growth, ageing of the population, changing nature of the burden of disease and greater focus on health prevention, which taken together with consumer and workforce expectations, combine to result in increasing demand for health care services and for healthcare workforce.

The current and projected shortage in the Australian health workforce are driven by a complex interaction of demographic, socio-cultural, clinical and professional factors that exert influences on both the demand for health workers’ services, and the supply of health workers. These shortages are not uniformly distributed, but vary by health profession, specialty, jurisdiction and geographical location (metropolitan, rural, remote).

As part of developing the health workforce reform package for consideration of and subsequent agreement by COAG in November 2008, the National Health Workforce Taskforce commissioned KPMG to prepare an analysis that outlines the factors influencing current and projected workforce shortage and that considers the implications that these factors may have on workforce development strategies. This document provides a useful background and insight to the problems being faced.”

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